Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Vision Decrease 15 years after LASIK

Question: I had LASIK Surgery about 15 years ago and now my vision seems to be less than 20/20? Can I have it again?


Answer: Whether or not you can have a LASIK enhancement really depends on why your vision has decreased and the overall status and health of your eyes. If you have become more nearsighted, your doctor needs to understand the reasons. If it is due to some regression of the LASIK treatment-which is not common-then this needs to be considered as well. Most importantly the health, shape and thickness of the cornea need to be considered. After ruling out any other contributing eye health factors then if the decreased vision is due to a refractive error your LASIK surgeon will be able to advise you of the possibility of an enhancement. Your best next step is to schedule an exam and consultation with your LASIK surgeon

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care. 

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

LASIK with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

Question: Can someone diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have LASIK surgery?  I have a tough time reading and have astigmatism.


Answer: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is an inherited connective tissue disorder that is caused by a defect in the structure, production, or processing of collagen or proteins that interact with collagen. Typically patients with EDS can have many corneal problems due to biomechanical weakness from a thin cornea and defective collagen. Even if there appears to be a regular eye surface topography, in general all types of EDS remain a contraindication to laser refractive surgery such as LASIK. To find out for certain if LASIK in your case is possible you should schedule a consultation with a LASIK surgeon who is a corneal specialist.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care. 

Monovision LASIK No Longer Effective


Question: I had LASIK surgery on one eye to correct my distance vision a sort of monovision LASIK. This allowed be to stop using glasses for several years. But now my near vision has deteriorated to the point that I am wearing reading and computer glasses. Is it possible to have LASIKsurgery on the other eye to correct the near vision issues and again dispense with the glasses?  I had astigmatism in both eyes but that was corrected in the eye that underwent the first LASIK treatment. Is there a better alternative? I have not had any indications of cataracts. I have been treated for glaucoma in the past but discontinued treatment after I stopped running. The pressures have been good without treatment and are checked annually.


Answer: Correcting your untreated eye will not allow for better near and intermediate range vision-in fact it will make it worse. You do not indicate your age, but even without cataracts you may want to consider lens replacement surgery in order to have multifocal lens implants that might solve your near vision issue. LASIK will not accomplish this for you. Your best next step is to have a consultation with a refractive surgeon who is also a cataract surgeon and share your needs.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care. 

Monday, February 3, 2014

Maine Corneal Specialist offers LASIK Information

“We know that a considerable number of patients use the web to learn about LASIK surgery. What we also know is that it is important for them have information about the corneal diseases, conditions and problems that might preclude them from being good LASIK candidates-so we do this on our new web site,” explained Ravi Shah, M.D., a Corneal Specialist andLASIK Surgeon at Eyecare Medical Group in Portland, Maine. “While not overly frequent in occurrence, Fuchs’ Dystrophy and Keratoconus are both cornealdystrophies that can have significant impact on patients’ ability to function day to day-and conditions for which we now have treatment options including new types of cornea transplants for both and the promise of corneal cross linking procedures for Keratoconus,” further explained Dr. Shah. “We encourage these patients to learn more by visiting our web site.”




To learn more about Eyecare Medical Group in Portland Maine, LASIK, corneal diseases, conditions, problems & surgery you may visit the new web site at www.eyecaremed.com.

Friday, January 17, 2014

LASIK with Cataract & Dry Eye

Question: I would like to have LASIK but I have the beginning of a cataract in right eye-would that be a problem? Will I have night vision problems? Is there excessive dry eyes? I have dry eyes already is this going to make unbearable?

Answer: You do not state your age or how long you have had the cataract and whether it is stable or progressive. All of these factors may be important to determine whether you are suitable to have LASIK. In general if you have ANY form of a progressive cataract you are NOT a god LASIK candidate. Further, if you have symptomatic dry eye it would most likely be necessary to treat this prior to LASIK as LASIK might further increase your dry eye symptoms. From what you describe you are better off considering Lens Replacement Surgery which would correct your vision, remove your crystalline lenses and thus eliminate the cataract concern and pose much lesser risk to the dry eye exacerbation. 

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care. 

Friday, January 10, 2014

LASIK & Progressive Bifocals

Question: I interested in LASIK eye surgery but I wear progressive bifocals and wasn't sure if that is a possibility. I am also wondering if the fact that I have Rheumatoid Arthritis would affect my eligibility.

Answer: LASIK is mainly used to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism for seeing clearly at distance. Progressive addition bifocals give you a full range of vision and not just distance vision correction. A technique called monovision LASIK can often be used to provide a certain limited range of arm’s length and near vision-but it really depends on your near and intermediate vision correction demands and needs. Your best next step is to find a top LASIK surgeon and schedule a consultation. Be prepared to provide the exact distances that you need to see clearly for and how you use your vision for varying distance tasks. Now, Rheumatoid Arthritis could be a relative contraindication for LASIK depending on whether it is medically controlled. The LASIK surgeon will need to discuss this with your Rheumatologist.


Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care. 

Near Vision Correction & Farsightedness

Question: I am farsighted. I would like to be able to read without glasses. What are my options and what is your recommendation?


Answer: You do not state either your age or how farsighted you actually are so it is difficult to really accurate information. However, let’s try. Most LASIK surgeons suggest that LASIK is appropriate for only lower degrees of farsighted correction as there can be considerable regression over time. Further, even if you were modestly farsighted you would still need to have LASIK monovision which corrects one eye for distance and one eye for near. LASIK monovision success depends on the degree of correction as well, and your tolerance to some residual blur-so this is highly specific to your individual situation. Probably the option that is most likely to give you good vision at distance and near is Lens Replacement Surgery with multifocal or accommodating lens implants. This option again depends on your age, but not really your correction. Thus, your best next step is to find a cataract surgeon who is also a refractive surgeon and have a thorough examination and consultation. From this information e or she will be able to make a sound recommendation for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.