Thursday, October 10, 2013

LASIK for Presbyopia & Farsightedness

Question: I had LASK done about 10 years ago to correct nearsightedness. I'm now 52 and I am farsighted. Can I get another LASIK in order to correct the farsightedness?


Answer: Are you sure that you are farsighted? Is your vision clear at distance and now you have problems seeing up close as you have gotten older? This could very well be presbyopia and NOT farsightedness. You need to schedule a thorough eye exam-preferably with a LASIK surgeon and determine the real cause of your complaint. From that it will be possible to evaluate your suitability for another LASIK procedure or even another type of refractive surgery that might be appropriate. It really depends on the true cause of your vision change.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care. 

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

LASIK & Nearsighted Prescription Stability

Question:  I am 29. I am nearsighted with a current vision of -8.00 D in my right eye and -8.50 D in my left eye. My vision had been the same for 3 years, but then increased by -.5 D in each eye on my last visit. Based on this information, would I be a candidate for LASIK surgery?

Answer: Most LASIK surgeons would not find a .5 D increase in prescription in one year a contraindication to performing LASIK surgery as it is still relatively stable. However, there are many other criteria that need to be considered in determining whether you are a good candidate. Specifically one would want to know that the thickness and shape of your cornea were normal and the prescription changes are not related to cornea issues. Given the degree of your nearsighted correction, corneal thickness must be sufficient to allow for full correction and perhaps even thick enough to allow for an enhancement should it be necessary. Further, your tear film must be healthy and plentiful and lastly, your retina and other internal structures and tissue must be healthy.


Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.