Thursday, October 10, 2013

LASIK for Presbyopia & Farsightedness

Question: I had LASK done about 10 years ago to correct nearsightedness. I'm now 52 and I am farsighted. Can I get another LASIK in order to correct the farsightedness?


Answer: Are you sure that you are farsighted? Is your vision clear at distance and now you have problems seeing up close as you have gotten older? This could very well be presbyopia and NOT farsightedness. You need to schedule a thorough eye exam-preferably with a LASIK surgeon and determine the real cause of your complaint. From that it will be possible to evaluate your suitability for another LASIK procedure or even another type of refractive surgery that might be appropriate. It really depends on the true cause of your vision change.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care. 

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

LASIK & Nearsighted Prescription Stability

Question:  I am 29. I am nearsighted with a current vision of -8.00 D in my right eye and -8.50 D in my left eye. My vision had been the same for 3 years, but then increased by -.5 D in each eye on my last visit. Based on this information, would I be a candidate for LASIK surgery?

Answer: Most LASIK surgeons would not find a .5 D increase in prescription in one year a contraindication to performing LASIK surgery as it is still relatively stable. However, there are many other criteria that need to be considered in determining whether you are a good candidate. Specifically one would want to know that the thickness and shape of your cornea were normal and the prescription changes are not related to cornea issues. Given the degree of your nearsighted correction, corneal thickness must be sufficient to allow for full correction and perhaps even thick enough to allow for an enhancement should it be necessary. Further, your tear film must be healthy and plentiful and lastly, your retina and other internal structures and tissue must be healthy.


Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care. 

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Glasses after LASIK Surgery

Question: I had LASIK surgery 9 years ago and required an enhancement in my left eye a year later.  I now need glasses to see distance and night driving. I find it better to wear my glasses all the time because the eye strain from not wearing them causes me headaches.  I had LASIK originally so I wouldn't have to wear glasses and my eyes are too sensitive to wear contacts.  I am 40 years old and my reading vision is great.  Are there increased risks of having a second enhancement in the same eye? Should I just live with it?  It seems unusual, from what I have read, for my eyesight to go this bad after LASIK-should I see a different LASIK surgeon?

Answer: You are making the assumption that a LASIK enhancement is the appropriate solution to your vision problem. However, you do not state whether you indeed have some degree of uncorrected refractive error such as nearsightedness or perhaps whether other problems-related or unrelated to LASIK are the cause of your problem. While it sounds like you have residual nearsightedness based on being able to read but need to wear glasses for distance and night driving, there are a host of reasons this might be the case. Before you decide to have a second enhancement, the best next step is to schedule a consultation with the best LASIK surgeon you can find in your area and determine the cause of your complaints. Having multiple enhancements is NOT typical unless there is an underlying problem or unless there was initially an extreme degree of nearsightedness corrected especially in a previous contact lens wearer who did not discontinue for an adequate period of time. Many potential questions must be answered as to the cause of the instability of your vision BEFORE an enhancement ids offered.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.


Wednesday, August 28, 2013

LASIK with Cataracts & Presbyopia

Question: I have mild cataracts and use reading glasses and need distance vision correction. I need help as vision is important to my job and in general of course. Will LASIK surgery help me?

Answer: LASIK for anyone with cataracts is not a great idea. You do not state your age or the type and degree of distance vision correction you require, nor the type of job you do so it is a bit difficult to share much information. In general, although monovision LASIK might be helpful to offer some simultaneous correction of far and near vision, without knowing your occupation and the distance correction it is not probable that you are a LASIK candidate. Depending on these factors it is possible that lens replacement surgery with a multifocal or accommodating lens implant might be helpful-but AGAIN the only way to know for sure is to schedule a consultation with a LASIK surgeon who is also a Cataract surgeon and see what they recommend for you.


Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

LASIK for Extreme Farsightedness

Question: I would like to have LASIK but I am farsighted and have a prescription of +7.00 in one eye and +4.75 in the other with astigmatism of -3.75 in one eye and -2.25 in the other eye. Is it really that bad? Could I still qualify as a candidate for LASIK surgery? I'm only 15 and I know that I have to be at least 18 and my prescription has to be stable in order to undergo the surgery but I'm just wondering if I will be able to get it done in the future.


Answer: Actually your prescription indicates that you are quite farsighted and have a moderate amount of astigmatism. While some of the lasers used for LASIK are technically capable of delivering this type of correction, the results over a long period of time may not provide the stability and consistency that would make you a great candidate. There are LASIK surgeons who might encourage you-but the general experience with prescriptions like yours is not impressive. That said, it is entirely possible that by the time you are 18 years old there will be other methods-perhaps including phakic lens implants-that offer a better result.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

LASIK for Accommodative Esotropia

Question: I am 18 years old and I have Accommodative Esotropia. I wear glasses and contacts to help prevent my eyes from crossing but sometimes they still do and they are even worse without glasses or contacts but I was wondering if LASIK surgery would help my eyes work together properly but if not would there be another type of surgery to help them? Or at least make them align better?

Answer: If you have accommodative esotropia the probability is that you are highly hyperopic or farsighted and possibly also require a bifocal prescription as well as your contacts to keep your eyes aligned for near vision. If this is the case then LASIK is probably not a great choice as it would be impossible to provide a near bifocal prescription. In addition you do not state whether you have any prism correction in your glasses-if you do this would also make you a poor LASIK candidate. Now, when you are older it might be possible to have lens implants with lens replacement surgery depending on the state of your eyes at that time-however you are too young to consider this intraocular surgery at this time.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, May 20, 2013

LASIK Vision Correction for Astigmatism


Question: Ten years ago I went for a consultation for LASIK vision correction, but I was told I wasn't a good candidate due to my astigmatism. At the time I was 18 years old. Due you think now with technology and my age I might qualify?

Answer: If your cornea is healthy and normal in terms of shape and thickness-and if the astigmatism is regular and anatomical rather than due to thinning or a disease process, there are pretty good chances that your astigmatism is correctable with LASIK vision correction. This of course will depend on you overall correction requirements, the stability of your prescription and the general health of your eyes and tear film. You should find a top LASIK surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation to have the necessary measurements taken and a thorough evaluation performed.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Blurry Vision, Dry Eye & LASIK


Question: I had LASIK 5 weeks ago and at my 1 week visit had 20/15 in both eyes. Now, I have slightly blurry vision in my right eye and the LASIK surgeon says it is dry eye. Why isn’t it in both eyes if it is dry eyes?

Answer: Your eyes are anatomically different and heal at different rates. Dry eye after LASIK is the most common BUT TRANSIENT side effect with LASIK surgery. Depending on the distribution of nerves in the cornea and how they are temporarily interrupted by the LASIK and healing process it is entirely possible for the tear film to sustain greater instability in one eye or the other. You should not judge your vision with LASIK until about three months time at which time the healing should be complete. Follow the instructions and recommendations of your LASIK surgeon and keep the eye and tear healthy an intact with whatever drops or treatment options they recommend.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Peripheral Vision with Multifocal Lens Implants


Question: Does the Tecnis® Multifocal Lens Implant provide good peripheral vision or is it restricted as in trifocal glasses?  Is the glare and halo going to impair my night time driving?

Answer: In general lens implants do not restrict your peripheral vision-even multifocal lens implants. As you indicate they can create glare and halo and night driving problems for some patients. For the vast majority of patients there is a time period after which the optical effects that create the glare, halo and possible night driving problems are no longer noticed and you “learn” to see with them and simply adapt and no longer find these effects annoying.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Too Severe Prescription for LASIK


Question: I was rejected for LASIK surgery about five years ago because my prescription was too severe.  My eyes are getting worse.  My right eye is -14.00-1.25 x165 and my left eye is -13.25-.75 x145.  Is there any kind of vision correction surgery that could help now?

Answer: There is not enough information to really know whether your eyes are healthy enough for other types of vision correction surgery with such a severe nearsighted prescription. Some things to consider include what your best corrected spectacle visual acuity is in each eye as this would be important to know. In addition, whether your cornea is fairly normal in terms of thickness and shape as well as the health and integrity of your tears. Next, you state that your eyes are getting worse. If in fact if your prescription is increasing and is unstable this too could impact your suitability for any type of vision correction surgery. If these factors as well as the overall health of your eyes and lens and retina are normal then it is possible for you to consider a Phakic lens implant Visian ICL™ Implantable Collamer Lens which is similar to an implantable contact lens and is often useful in very highly myopic people such as you. Your best next step is to find a refractive surgeon who offers both LASIK and lens implants and schedule a consultation to see what you might be a candidate for. 

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Laser Eye Surgery after RK


Question: I had RK just before laser eye surgery treatments were available. At 65 my vision is getting poor due to astigmatism. Is there any hope for clear vision with LASIK or other laser eye surgery in my case? 

Answer: Without knowing the exact nature of the RK-how many incisions, how they were placed, whether the astigmatism is regular or irregular-it is impossible to know whether laser eye surgery might be helpful. There are many instances where PRK can be applied and the vision corrected but this is really determined on a case by case basis. You need to find an experienced Refractive Surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation to see what is possible.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK after Heart Surgery


Question: My vision is not so good and I'm lost without my glasses and would love to have LASIK surgery. I had open heart surgery 2 years ago for a valve replacement and everything is going well but I take multiple medications including the blood thinner Coumadin. Does this affect my chances of getting LASIK surgery?

Answer: If your health is stable and your eyes are healthy then you will need to meet the same basic requirements as others to be a good LASIK candidate. You will need to have healthy corneas that are thick enough and properly shaped along with a sufficient quantity of healthy tears. Your prescription should be stable and you should have realistic goals of what you would like to accomplish in terms of lifestyle by having LASIK. Without knowing the list of medications it is impossible to say if any of them will preclude you from having LASIK but it is not terribly likely. Your best next step is to schedule a LASIK consultation with the best LASIK surgeon you can find in your area and they will be able to examine you and determine whether there are any contraindications to having LASIK.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.


Thursday, April 25, 2013

Visian™ ICL Cost & Timing


Question: I have been told LASIK is not an option for me, due to a high prescription and thin corneas.  I was told that Visian™ ICL's would be the best option for me. One eye surgeon gave me a quote of $3850 an eye, and she would do the ICL's about a week apart. Another doctor said it would be $5450 for both eyes, and he would do both eyes at the same time.  All of his reviews (except for one) have been great and it appears he has done many ICL’s.  What am I missing?    Why is one so much more inexpensive than the other?!

Answer: The range of costs for a Visian™ ICL run from approximately $2500 per eye to $4500 per eye. The variation occurs due to geographic differences as well as what the quoted fee includes. Many surgeons prefer to do the implantable lens procedure in a sterile operating room much as they would do other intraocular surgery and thus incur a facility fee for the surgery center which is included in the fee. If the surgeon owns their own surgery center they may not “charge themselves” the same fee as a surgeon using an independent surgery center might incur. Further, Visian™ requires a YAG PI Laser procedure to create an opening in the iris. Some surgeons charge this as a separate procedure-either to the patent or their insurance and don’t quote it in the Visian™ fee. Last, on some occasions it is necessary to do a LASIK for a “fine tuning’ of the prescription on top of the Visian™ for the best vision correction results. Some surgeons include this as part of the quoted fee whereas others charge a separate additional fee. These types of considerations could contribute to the variations in quoted costs. Most conservative surgeons might wait a week between eyes to make sure the healing and outcome are as planned.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, April 22, 2013

LASIK Consultation & Surgery Timing


Question: How soon after a LASIK consultation can the procedure be done?

Answer: Assuming that your LASIK consultation demonstrates a healthy tear film, normal corneal thickness, shape and health as well as your overall eye health being normal in addition to a stable prescription you can schedule your LASIK surgery as soon as you wish. 

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK for Mild Nearsightedness?


Question: I want to know if I can have LASIK for my mild nearsightedness. I am nearsighted and have been with the same weak prescription for many years of -1.00 right eye and -.75 left eye. Am I a candidate for laser eye surgery?

Answer: LASIK or any type of Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction of common vision problems such as nearsightedness is helpful for correcting distance vision for people who do not want to be dependent on glasses or contacts. If you wear your glasses full time and are hindered by them then it is possible that YOU MIGHT be a candidate. However, with the weak prescription that you note it is doubtful that you actually wear your glasses on a full time basis. Your best next step is to find the best LASIK surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Non LASIK Candidate Options

Question: I am 24 years old, -9.00 D of nearsightedness and not a good LASIK candidate. What are my other options? 

Answer: You do not state why you are not a good LASIK candidate. Some of the reasons that would exclude you as a LASIK candidate may also exclude you from other refractive surgery options. In particular if your eyes-especially your cornea-have any concurrent disease or problems of the retina or the cornea, you could be excluded as a candidate for the Visian™ ICL Implantable Collamer Lens. The Visian™ ICL is a type of Phakic Lens Implant that functions like an implantable contact lens. It is placed behind the Iris, in front of the Pupil and can readily correct -9.00 D of nearsightedness. It is intraocular surgery rather than corneal laser surgery and thus has some different criteria for being a good candidate. Your best next step is to schedule a consultation with the best Refractive Surgeon in your area and discuss whether you might be a good candidate for this option.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK for Nearsightedness & High Myopia

Question: I am very nearsighted and wondering about LASIK.  My eyes are nearsighted and at a -11 D prescription.  I've been told all my life by eye doctors that I'd be a good candidate for LASIK. But recently, an ophthalmologist told me my eyesight was too poor to be a good LASIK candidate.  I'm looking for more opinions. What kind of improvement can I realistically expect from a LASIK surgery?

Answer: First, there is no way to tell whether you are a good LASIK candidate solely from your prescription. Being a good LASIK candidate requires a reasonably stable prescription, adequate corneal thickness, normal corneal shape, adequate and healthy tears as well as a generally healthy eye and reasonable overall health. That said, -11.00 D of myopia or nearsightedness is quite high for LASIK. It is not an absolute contraindication in and of itself but it does require a fairly significant amount of corneal thickness-which you may or may not have. Generally, LASIK surgeons would prefer to only treat up to perhaps -8.00 or -9.00 D if possible-but again this is not absolute. Also, it is quite important that should you be a LASIK candidate, you have either a custom wavefront or custom wavefront optimized treatment to minimize the spherical aberration induced by such a high correction.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

LASIK Eye Surgery with Astigmatism

Question: Can I have LASIK if I have astigmatism. My optometrist told me I couldn’t have LASIK with astigmatism and I wanted to know?

Marc Michelson, M.D.
Michelson Laser Vision
Birmingham, Alabama
Answer: It is a common misconception-even among some optometrists-that you can’t have LASIK if you have astigmatism. LASIK Eye Surgery is actually an excellent way to correct astigmatism for most people. However, there are certain considerations. First, the health of your eyes has to be good-especially the cornea. The astigmatism CANNOT be due to a corneal problems, disease or dystrophy-especially Keratoconus which causes astigmatism and pathological thinning of the corneal tissue. To get the best results from LASIK with astigmatism you should have regular rather than irregular astigmatism which sometimes indicates other corneal problems such as degenerations-including Terrien’s Degeneration or Pellucid Marginal Degeneration. If your cornea is heath and free from disease, degeneration or thinning-and is thick enough for LASIK, generally there is no reason that the astigmatism cannot be effectively corrected. Your best next step is to schedule a consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and perhaps even one who is a Corneal Specialist if there is any concern about the health of your cornea.


Dr. Michelson
Pre-Op
Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, March 4, 2013

LASIK for Farsightedness

Question: I am +4 in my left eye and +6.5 in my right eye and want to know if LASIK can correct my vision to close to 20/20. I am getting conflicting opinions from different eye doctors about whether LASIK is a good option for me.

Answer: LASIK can be an option for people with farsightedness or hyperopia. Technically, it is possible to correct the +4 and the +6.5 but this may or may not yield 20/20 and more importantly it is not likely to be stable. One would expect a high likelihood of regression of the treatment effect depending on your age and other factors. Most LASIK surgeons would prefer not to perform LASIK above +4 due to the regression. Depending on your age again, many refractive surgeons prefer to perform Refractive Lens Exchange, also called Lens Replacement Surgery, for people with moderate hyperopia and get excellent results. You should find a top LASIK surgeon in your area who is also the best Cataract Surgeon and schedule a consultation to see if this might be a better option for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, February 11, 2013

LASIK or Lens Replacement Surgery?


Question: When I was in my mid forties I began wearing glasses to read up close. As I got older my distance vision became blurry and I started wearing bifocals all the time. I am now 56 years old. I farm for a living and wearing glasses really is a hassle for me as I am continuously knocking them off, can't keep the dust off them and they fog up when I go in and out of heated buildings and vehicles. I was wondering if it is possible to correct my distance vision with LASIK where I do not have to wear glasses all the time. I do not mind wearing glasses to read with or when I do close up work. Naturally I would prefer to not have to wear any glasses, but at this point I'm willing to do almost anything to reduce my dependence on them.

Answer: Your occupation and dislike for eyeglasses is quite understandable.  It is not clear from your description whether you are actually nearsighted or farsighted at distance. We would guess that you are presbyopic-the near vision focusing problem that typically starts in your forties and most likely farsighted based on the timing of onset of your distance blurry vision. LASIK can correct mild degrees of farsightedness in many instances and help your distance vision-if your are determined to be a good candidate otherwise. However, based on your age it is quite possible that you might be an even better candidate for Lens Replacement Surgery using a multifocal lens implant to correct BOTH your distance and near vision all at once. This might actually allow you to be independent of glasses for 85-90% of the activities you do each day. It also entails removing the crystalline lens in your eye and replacing it-thus you will not have to worry about getting cataracts. That said, it is worth exploring by finding a top LASIK Surgeon in your area who is also the best Cataract Surgeon and scheduling a consultation to see what is possible.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

LASIK for Near Vision & Reading

Question: If I correct my near vision with LASIK will I lose my distance vision. At the moment I have to wear reading glasses but can see perfectly in the distance without glasses. Someone told me that if I have laser eye surgery it only corrects one vision. What is my best vision correction option? 

Answer: LASIK is really best for correcting your distance vision however using monovision LASIK is also helpful for people who need both distance correction and help with near vision and reading. As it sounds like you have no distance correction requirement, LASIK is not a good option for you. Depending on your age and the clarity of the crystalline lens inside your eye you may be a candidate for Lens Replacement Surgery in which the natural lens of your eye is replaced with a multifocal lens implant or an accommodating lens implant. Your best next step is to schedule a consultation ad examination with a Refractive Surgeon who is also a Cataract Surgeon and see what they suggest.  

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

LASIK: How Long Does It Last?

Question: How long does LASIK surgery last? If after LASIK surgery your eyesight changes will I have to be back in glasses again? Will I have to go back to the way I am within a year or two?

Answer: If your vision and prescription are stable prior to having LASIK-as is one of the considerations to determine whether you are a good candidate-then once you have recovered from the initial surgery you should not experience significant change in your distance vision. If your distance vision does change slightly it is possible to actually perform a retreatment some time later to add further correction for distance-as long as your cornea is healthy and thick enough to do so safely. Unless there are some other circumstance regarding the health of your cornea and eyes this should be the expected outcome regarding stability. Near vision is a different story. Depending on your age it is most probably that everyone who approaches and enters their 40’s will need some type of correction for close or near vision such as for reading. It is probable that if you are under 40 your near vision will in fact change and that you will need glasses-however this near vision focusing problem is not terribly amenable to LASIK. Your best next step is to schedule a consultation with a LASIK Surgeon in your area and thoroughly discuss these questions with them. Only with a thorough examination and consultation will you know whether you are indeed a candidate for LASIK and whether your eyes are actually stable.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.