Thursday, September 20, 2012

LASIK & NEAR VISION LOSS

Question: I am 57 years old, and nearsighted and can read perfectly without correction.  I currently wear one monovision contact lens for correction.  Recently, my eyes are getting very tired as I do a lot of computer and numbers work. If I have LASIK on both eyes to correct my distance vision, will I lose the ability to read without reading glasses?

Answer: If you are indeed nearsighted of a degree that allows you to see well up close for reading and you correct both eyes by any means-including LASIK-you will be rendering your eyes optically corrected for seeing clearly at distance and thus will no longer be "nearsighted". This will result is a loss of you near vision for reading. On the other hand, if you are now starting to be uncomfortable and feeling fatigued while reading with a monovision contact lens, it is likely that will experience the same symptoms with monovision LASIK. Thus, your best next step is to schedule a consultation with a LASIK Surgeon who is also a Cataract and Lens Implant Surgeon as exploring the option of Multifocal lens Implants may give you the results you desire.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, September 17, 2012

GPC & LASIK Eye Surgery Results

Question: I have GPC and would like to have LASIK. How will this affect the results of my laser eye surgery? What are my chances of getting a successful outcome? I also have astigmatism in one eye. I am 21 years old. When is the soonest I can get my eyes surgically corrected? I was told age 25.

Answer: First, regarding the age at which you can have LASIK Eye Surgery-most if not all LASIK Surgeons would perform Laser Eye Surgery for a 21 year old patient if they met all of the other criteria regarding eye health, prescription stability, corneal health, thickness, shape and integrity, tear film quality and quantity and systemic health. Many in fact might actually perform LASIK at an earlier age-as low as 18 years old if the criteria were met. Regarding the presence of GPC-you do not indicate whether it is due to contact lens wear or some other allergic reaction. This may or may not be important. In general, once the GPC has quieted down and not in an acute phase of reaction with excessive mucous production and/or itching-it is not likely to impact the results of a LASIK Eye Surgery procedure. Your best next step is to schedule a LASIK consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and have a thorough examination and consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Complex LASIK Surgery after RK

Question: As someone who has had the RK surgery in the early 90's should LASIK be an option for me today or is the risk too high at age 52? Second, I wish to know if it is good practice to correct one eye for nearsightedness and one eye for farsightedness.  I am unsure if one can adjust to one eye doing all the work for both near/farsightedness.  How will this affect people long term?  How long will the correction last before another surgery is required?

Answer:  Whether or not to have LASIK or any type of corneal Laser Eye Surgery after RK really depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you are attempting to obtain a monovision correction and no further distance correction really may make for a difficult result if the RK is not stable-which it tends not to be. So, stability and residual refractive error are some things that need to be considered. Further, depending on the location and the depth of the incisions used for the RK, it may only be possible to perform a surface ablation procedure such as PRK, rather than a lamellar procedure such as LASIK. In addition, the kind of work and activities that you perform and the degree and precision of near vision correction also weigh into the decision of whether corneal laser eye surgery with monovision or perhaps even a multifocal lens implant procedure might provide the best results. Your situation requires a consultation with an eye surgeon who is a specialist in corneal, laser, cataract and refractive surgery in order to deal with the various complexities and goals that you have. You should find a LASIK Surgeon who is preferably a Corneal Specialist and is also an experienced Refractive Cataract Surgeon in order to fully explore all of the possibilities.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.