Saturday, March 31, 2012

LASIK Consultation & Surgery-Wait Time?

Question: How long do I have to wait between my LASIK consultation and my LASIK surgery and my eyes are ready to go. This is with both eyes being done of course.

Answer: The waiting time between your LASIK consultation and LASIK surgery can vary from no time, to many weeks, depending on the results of your consultation. If your consultation demonstrates a normal health tear film, stable corneal curvatures and a stable prescription, then you can proceed immediately with being limited only by the LASIK Surgeon and the scheduling their individual logistics. If your tear film is deficient in any way and requires a ''tune up" requiring artificial tears, insertion of tiny punctal plugs, or prescription eye drops to help you make more tears-you may have to wait until the LASIK Surgeon confirms that your tear film is adequate. Likewise, if there is any distortion, curvature change or irregularity of the shape of your cornea as the result of wearing contact lenses, you may have to wait until it stabilizes. Last, if your refraction is unstable or variable, you also may have to wait until it is repeatable and stable. All of these factors would be considered as part of your LASIK consultation. Your next step is to find the best LASIK Surgeon you can in your area and schedule that consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, March 30, 2012

Multifocal Lens Implant & Astigmatism

Question: Can you have a multifocal lens implant if you have astigmatism? What else would an eye surgeon need to do because of the astigmatism?

Answer: At the present time in the U.S., there are no commercially available Multifocal Lens Implants that are also Toric Lens Implants and also correct astigmatism-they are still considered investigational and are in clinical trials for FDA approval, but are available in some countries outside the U.S. It is somewhat unpredictable as to when they will be available in the U.S.

There are three options for correcting astigmatism, if you are having a Multifocal Lens Implant. One, is to wear eyeglasses with the astigmatism correction-which probably isn't terribly desirable. Another, depending on the type and degree of astigmatism you have, is to have Limbal Relaxing Incisions (LRI) and a third option, is to have a Laser Eye Surgery procedure such as LASIK after the Lens Implant to correct the astigmatism. The best thing to do is to find the best LASIK Surgeon who is also a top Cataract Surgeon and schedule a consultation so that all of the measurements can be taken and they can make a proper recommendation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Dry Eyes & Dry Mouth-Same Problem?

“When my patients-especially women-complain about dry eyes, I am careful to always ask them about dry mouth symptoms as well as achy joints,” stated Connecticut Ophthalmologist and Corneal Specialist Leslie Doctor, M.D. of Doctor & Associates in Fairfield County CT. “Sometimes they give me a funny look when I explain that dry eye and dry mouth symptoms may be related.”


"Patients might not be aware that if they have dryness in their eyes and mouth, along with fatigue or pain and swelling in some of their joints, could indicate a condition called Sjögren’s syndrome,” commented Corneal Specialist and Massachusetts Ophthalmologist Keegan Johnson, M.D. of Center for Sight in Fall River.

“Sjögren’s syndrome is thought to affect some 4 million people in the United States-so we do see it in everyday practice. While it can be found in men and women, the vast majority of patients with Sjögren’s syndrome are women in their 50’s and 60’s,” reported Dr. Leslie Doctor. “Statistically Sjögren’s syndrome is nine times more likely to occur in women.”

“In Sjögren’s syndrome, the body’s immune system can attack moisture producing cells throughout the body-the eyes, mouth, joints and even other internal organs can be affected. As a corneal specialist, I will assess the health of the ocular surface but I may also request consultation with an oral disease specialist or a dentist experienced with dry mouth and a rheumatologist, who can manage and coordinate the patient’s care,” stressed Dr. Johnson.

Sjögren’s syndrome is a chronic condition, and there is no cure. However, coordinated care and treatment by ophthalmologists who are specialists in dry eye and eye surface disease, dentists who are specialists in dry mouth and rheumatologists who specialize in the immune system can improve symptoms, make patients more comfortable and prevent problems like cavities and eye infections.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

LASIK Surgery with Dry Eyes?

Question: I am booked in to have LASIK next week (prescription -3.5 and -2.75). However, during my consultation I was told that I currently have dry eyes (although I don't feel as if they are dry, except when wearing contact lenses), and I will likely need to take drops for up to six months after the procedure. I am concerned that the dry eye will be severe and continue for longer than six months. The other consultations did not mention that my eyes are currently dry. Is it ok to have LASIK if eyes are already dry?

Answer: There is some threshold of adequate tear film quality and quantity necessary to have successful and comfortable LASIK. If you have been wearing contact lenses comfortably for the most part, then it is not likely that your eyes are too dry, but perhaps are borderline dry eyes. In fact, some of this dryness may actually be due to the wearing of contact lenses. Contact lenses do alter the ocular surface and can cause dry eye problems by themselves. Now, it common and expected for many "normal" people to have dry eye symptoms after LASIK. If you have a borderline dry eye, it is probable that you will experience dry eye complaints after LASIK. If your tear film was terribly inadequate, your LASIK Surgeon would have either not recommended LASIK or prescribed some pretreatment, with either artificial tear drops, punctal plugs and/or Restasis eye drops, in or to "tune up" your tears. It is entirely possible that after your LASIK treatment you will require one or more of these to help with dry eyes. It is very important that you follow the specific instructions and recommendations of your LASIK Surgeon, who will be monitoring your healing and helping you to achieve a comfortable recovery with the best possible results.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Sunday, March 25, 2012

Best LASIK Price Shopping

Question: I have had a consultation and am recommended for LASIK eye treatment. I am e-mailing to get a price quote per eye. I am nearsighted -4.25 and am searching for the economically sound price.

Answer: Shopping for the best LASIK price by e-mail is a, no pun, "short sighted" path to successful LASIK Surgery. Choosing a LASIK Surgeon is the MOST important decision that you will make in obtaining the best possible results as well as a safe, effective outcome in terms of your overall patient satisfaction and future eye health.

LASIK is NOT like buying tires for your car.

The surgical skill, experience and interpersonal skills of the LASIK Surgeon are key to your satisfaction. What makes you think you are in a position to evaluate this through e-mail? The price for LASIK should simply NOT be the criteria by which someone chooses a LASIK Surgeon. If you cannot afford to find the best LASIK Surgeon with top notch staff and with whom you can quickly establish a trusting relationship during an individual consultation-THEN YOU SHOULDN'T DO IT!

Further, just because a particular LASIK Surgeon told you are a good candidate does not mean others would also find you a suitable candidate. Schedule as many LASIK consultations as you need to find the LASIK Surgeon that provides you with the best evaluation, answers all of your questions and takes the time necessary to ensure your ultimate success. Stop shopping for health care and eye surgery via e-mail.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, March 22, 2012

LASIK Enhancement & Flap Debris Problem

Question: I have undergone a LASIK enhancement 2 weeks ago and am told I have tear residue under the flap. I was told it would go away in 1-2 weeks but my vision is not improving at all. Will this go away? What if it doesn't go away? What then?

Answer: It is really not possible to comment too much with the limited information you have relayed, but there are some things that may be relevant to your situation.

First, LASIK is "lamellar" surgery-meaning that is performed between the layers of the cornea-and under a thin "flap". Whether during a primary procedure or a secondary procedure, such as a LASIK enhancement, there is always the possibility that debris or material can get trapped under the flap. You have described "tear residue" and we are uncertain as to what exactly this is. It could be oily residue-particularly if you have oily skin. It could also be a mucous type material that can also come from the tears-or it could be both. In either of these situations, the material does work its way out or reabsorb, typically with a month or so, at the outside-often quicker. You should begin to see some improvement within 1-2 weeks albeit perhaps slowly. If you do not, it might suggest that there is another type of potential problem, whereby some of the corneal epithelium has actually gotten trapped under the flap in addition to, or instead of the tear "residue". This is a more concerning problem and needs to be addressed by your LASIK Surgeon. If, after 1-2 weeks and certainly after 4 weeks, you are not seeing considerable improvement in your vision, you need to see your LASIK Surgeon for an examination and discuss what steps he or she suggests as this is the time limit that would reflect a prudent observation and self resolution timeframe.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

LASIK Surgery with Nystagmus

Question: I have mild nystagmus and would like to have LASIK surgery. About two years ago, I went to a LASIK eye surgeon to see if I was a candidate for LASIK and was told that it was possible. I know this won't get rid of the eye movement, but I just don't want to wear glasses if that is possible. Can I have LASIK and what is the best type of surgery to have?
Answer: In many instances, LASIK with nystagmus is possible. In order to determine whether you are still a good LASIK candidate, or if perhaps you might be better off with some other type of Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction such as PRK, it is necessary for you to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation. From the examination and measurements it will be possible to tell you if you should proceed and what you can expect in terms of success and to also identify what types of procedures would be most appropriate for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular, a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Saturday, March 17, 2012

LASIK vs. Lens Implants for Hyperopia & Presbyopia

Question: I want to know if I qualify for some type of vision correction surgery such as LASIK or maybe Lens Implants. My uncorrected vision for my right eye is 20/80 and my left eye is 20/50 and I have hyperopia, astigmatism and presbyopia and the beginnings of cataracts. I am 53 years old and had RK 30 years ago to correct my vision.
Answer: Although your case has some more complex elements, there might be a relatively straight forward path to follow to help you consider vision correction surgery. First, the fact that you have the beginnings of Cataracts makes you unsuitable for any type of Laser Vision Correction procedure such as LASIK. Further, LASIK would not be a great choice anyway based on your hyperopia and presbyopia, along with your previous RK. So, Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction should not be considered at all.

Now, the fact that you have Cataracts beginning suggests that in the foreseeable future you will need Cataract Surgery and Lens Implants. At 53 years old with hyperopia and presbyopia, Lens Implants can be an excellent method of vision correction. The only compounding factors are the degree of astigmatism, whether it is regular and to what degree it is correctable and if there is any great degree of progression of the hyperopia and the astigmatism. With Cataracts forming, this is actually a very good option to consider and avoids corneal surgery, which can be more complicated after RK. So, your best next step is to find the best LASIK Surgeon who is also a top Cataract Surgeon and is facile in dealing the extra complex measurements required for patients who have had previous RK. You might very well wish to find a Corneal Specialist who is also a Cataract and Refractive Surgeon and schedule a consultation. From the examination and consultation, they will be able to give you guidance in whether Lens Implants would give you the results you are  seeking.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, March 16, 2012

iPad, LASIK & Computer Vision Syndrome

What do the iPad, LASIK and Computer Vision Syndrome have in common you ask. Literally millions and millions of people have iPads-and this is likely to increase with the release of the new iPad 3. Literally millions and millions of people have had or are thinking about having LASIK-and this is likely to increase as we continue to see increases in consumer confidence and consumer spending as the economy slowly improves. A huge number of people who have LASIK are also iPad users and therein lies the connection to Computer Vision Syndrome.

“We know that after having LASIK Surgery some patients may experience dry eye symptoms that we can manage with a range of treatments from artificial tear eye drops, to tiny punctal plugs and even Restasis eye drops to help patients make more of their own tears,” commented NewJersey LASIK Surgeon and Corneal Specialist Joel Confino, M.D. of The Eye Care & Surgery Center. “Today, we live in a digital world in which we are constantly using computers, cell phones that essentially have tiny computer screens and now everywhere we look-iPads,” said Dr. Confino.

Computer Vision Syndrome is a form of eye strain from computer use associated with staring at computer screens, mobile phones, video games and reading devices including iPads. “Long periods of focusing on these electronic devices doesn’t cause permanent damage to your eyes but may induce dry and tired eyes-this is something to be aware of, if you have recently had LASIK or are considering LASIK,” remarked BaltimoreLASIK Surgeon and Corneal Specialist Brad Spagnolo, M.D. of the Baltimore Washington Eye Center. “It would be good to tell your LASIK Surgeon about the extent and duration of your iPad and overall computer use so that he or she can take the necessary steps to help you avoid dry eyes and computer vision syndrome after LASIK.”  

During your LASIK Consultation, always be sure to tell your LASIK Surgeon about all of your personal vision correction goals as well as any prescription, over the counter and other medications you might take, as well as your computer use and how you have integrated digital technology, such as mobile phone use, iPad use and other electronic devices into your everyday routine.

Thursday, March 15, 2012

LASIK & Harley Davidson Motorcycle Ride?

Question: How long after LASIK can I ride my Harley Davidson motorcycle?

Answer: With the approval of your LASIK Surgeon, it would be possible for you to ride your Harley Davidson motorcycle about two weeks after your LASIK Eye Surgery treatment with the provision that you MUST wear eye protection. In fact, anyone who is a motorcycle rider should ALWAYS wear eye protection that includes at a minimum goggles and/or a full face shield. This is even more important for patients who have LASIK for a few reasons. Motorcycle riding exposes the rider to fast moving particulates such as dirt, dust and road grime that cause considerable eye irritation. Further, being out with other vehicles means you are also exposing your eyes to exhaust fumes and other airborne pollutants and pollen, all of which can cause further irritation. Small pebbles and road debris are yet another source of eye injury-thus wear eye protection.

After LASIK we want to be sure that the ocular surface remains healthy and heals properly and that you are not inclined to aggressively rub your eyes. Riders really enjoy the feel of the wind-but that wind also dries out the surface of the eye which is important for continued healing. Thus, to avoid increasing the dry eye symptoms after LASIK, we must keep the wind and air blowing at a minimum-so please wear eye protection. Review and get clearance from your LASIK Surgeon-WEAR EYE PROTECTION-and enjoy the ride on your Harley!
Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, March 8, 2012

LASIK for Extreme Farsightedness

Question: I have a question about LASIK for extreme farsightedness. I have checked every couple of years to see if the technology has gotten better for my eyes. Can laser vision correction correct a contact lens prescription of +6.5 (farsighted)?

Answer: Your question regarding LASIK, or really any type of Laser Eye Surgery to correct extreme farsightedness, really is not a "technology" question but rather an "outcome" question about the safety efficacy and predictability of Laser Vision Correction for this type of correction. Technically there are lasers that can be programmed to correct your level of farsightedness. However, there are "outcome" reasons that Laser Eye Surgery may not be the best choice.

Depending on your age-younger, say less than 40 years old-there is a high likelihood of instability and regression of the highly farsighted prescription making it necessary to do enhancements-often more than once. This is more so the case with LASIK than with PRK, but it still a problem. When you are over 40 and in your 50's, there are better options for the high hyperopic correction that use Lens Replacement Surgery, which removes the crystalline lens and replaces it with a permanent Lens Implant.

This is much more predictable and since the crystalline lens is removed, it eliminates the possibility of developing a Cataract. Extreme farsighted patients seem to do much better, and are happier, with the stability and overall result, as compared to Laser Vision Correction. It would be worthwhile to find a top LASIK Surgeon who is also a top Cataract Surgeon and schedule a consultation to discuss whether this might be suitable for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Trends in BOTOX® for LASIK Patients


“The increasing trend of requests for BOTOX® from LASIK patients is not terribly surprising,” noted Greg Hofeldt, M.D., a Massachusetts Cosmetic Eye Plastic Surgeon at Center for Sight in Fall River, MA. “As the average age of LASIK patients has drifted upward into the late 30’s, early 40’s and even late 40’s-so has the interest in BOTOX®. When LASIK Surgeons successfully help patients reduce or even eliminate their dependence on eyeglasses-they tend to see themselves differently.”

“When my LASIK patients are seeing well without having their facial features “framed” by eyeglasses they often remark that they never noticed so many of the fine lines and wrinkles,” commented Massachusetts LASIK Surgeon & Corneal Specialist Keegan Johnson, M.D. of Center for Sight. “I am happy to schedule them to see Dr. Hofeldt to discuss their areas of concern,” said Dr. Johnson.

Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK is a method of vision correction that can help patients who are nearsighted, farsighted or who have astigmatism, become less dependent on or even eliminate the need to wear eyeglasses and contact to see at distance. BOTOX® Cosmetic is a type of non-surgical treatment that can be used to smooth fine lines and wrinkles. In order to determine if you are a candidate for LASIK Surgery or BOTOX®, or both, it is important to find a top LASIK Surgeon and an experienced BOTOX® physician and schedule an appointment.