Monday, April 23, 2012

LASIK & Rigid Contact Lenses

Question: How long before having LASIK do you have to stop wearing  rigid gas permeable contact lenses?

Answer: While LASIK for Rigid Gas Permeable Contact Lens wearers can be an excellent option for vision correction, patients do need to understand that the long term wear of contact lenses-especially rigid contact lenses-does cause changes to occur within the Cornea, its shape and curvature, its thickness and the actually eye surface with regard to the tear film. If at all possible your LASIK Surgeon will want to have all of those changes, if any, revert back to a more normal and stable condition prior to having LASIK Surgery. The length of time it takes for these changes to reverse is really a function of how long you have been wearing the contacts overall, how much and what type-regular or irregular-change in BOTH curvature and shape have occurred in the Cornea and to what extent there are changes to the tear film stability and integrity-all of which can vary widely based on the contact lens fitting characteristics. Further, all of these changes vary from individual based on how rigid-ocular rigidity-the eye itself is. So it is very complex. Some LASIK Surgeons apply a simple rule of thumb as a guideline for patient education that states patients must have their rigid contact lenses out one week for each year that they have been wearing contacts. THIS IS A GUIDELINE. Most of the time it is possible for the LASIK Surgeon to be able to measure stability and consistency of the curvature and shape after some 6 weeks or so-but this does vary. The best results with LASIK are achieved when the quality and consistency of the measurements is VERY stable. Your LASIK Surgeon will ask you to come in for multiple repeated visits to determine when that stability has been achieved and then once achieved you should be able to have LASIK almost immediately thereafter.


Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, April 16, 2012

Blurry Vision after Cataract Surgery

Question: I had cataract surgery and a lens implant about 2 weeks ago and my vision is blurry and has not cleared. It is like the cataract is still in my eye. The cataract surgeon doesn't seem to be concerned. What should I do and why did this happen?


Answer: It is impossible to tell you why your visual recovery from Cataract Surgery is not quicker as you do not know whether there may have been some complication during Cataract removal or what the overall health of your eye is, including the Cornea and the Retina. However, what we can tell you is that you should carefully follow the instructions given by your Cataract Surgeon. Some blurry vision 2 weeks after Cataract Surgery is possible is there is Corneal swelling, inflammation, certain reactions of the Retina and other situations that can sometimes occur after Cataract Surgery. If you are uncomfortable with the information your Cataract Surgeon is sharing, then it is never inappropriate to find the best Cataract Surgeons near your home and schedule an appointment for a second opinion.

Important Note: The information presented on the About Cataract Surgery Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask Cataract Surgeons section on aboutcataractsurgery.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to Cataracts, Cataract Surgery or Lens Implants. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask Cataract Surgeons section of aboutcataractsurgery.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and Cataract Surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monovision LASIK after Regular LASIK?

Question: Can you have Monovision LASIK after traditional LASIK to correct Presbyopia?

Answer: It may be possible to have Monovision LASIK after you have had traditional LASIK whereby both eyes were corrected for seeing at distance under certain circumstances and conditions.

First, if there is some degree of residual nearsightedness this would be helpful. Depending on the degree of near vision correction that is necessary to correct the Presbyopia, it may possible to perform a hyperopic LASIK in the non dominant eye to render it "nearsighted". This will depend on the shape and thickness of the cornea, the amount of correction required and the presence of an adequate and healthy tear film as well as your overall health. Upon examination and careful measurements by a LASIK Surgeon it would be possible to review the likelihood of achieving the desired result and ascertain the risks of either needing to create another "flap" or lift the current flap in order to perform the treatment.

Your next step is to schedule an appointment with the best LASIK Surgeon you can find and have a consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Hidden Costs of LASIK

Beware of low LASIK prices with hidden costs you don’t know about. LASIK costs are affordable for almost anyone who wishes to minimize their dependence on or even eliminate the need for eyeglasses and contact lenses to see at distance. BUT-there are many patients who shop for the best price for LASIK and end up getting an unpleasant surprise. “Reputable and trusted LASIK surgeons tend to quote fees for LASIK that are comprehensive fees-that is they include everything you need to have LASIK and its associated evaluations and follow up care-regardless of your prescription,” commented Baltimore LASIK Surgeon and Corneal Specialist at Baltimore Washington Eye Center.

Discount LASIK centers that offer the lure of the best price for LASIK often quote a price for LASIK that is right on the edge of being deceptive in that it uses the lowest price to draw you in for an evaluation and get you excited about the possibility of having LASIK but then presenting you with hidden costs and fees. These hidden costs and fees can include an additional fee for your prescription that was not within the advertised range, it can include an extra hidden cost of LASIK for astigmatism, it can include an additional hidden cost for follow up care, it may include an extra hidden cost for custom wavefront LASIK or an add on hidden cost for enhancements-and on and on. Hidden costs and fees for LASIK are somewhat typical of the sales and marketing practices of certain discount centers. LASIK is surgery. You should choose a LASIK surgeon based on their reputation as recommended by friends and relatives and NOT based on the best price. Choosing a LASIK surgeon based on the best price alone could set you up for a number of hidden costs you can’t even understand and end up costing you more in the long run.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

LASIK Wavefront Screening & Keratoconus

“We have been using wavefront analysis as part of our LASIK evaluations for many years to help us assess any optical irregularity that might indicate a subtle form of keratoconus,” commented NJ LASIK Specialist Joel Confino, M.D. a New Jersey Corneal Specialist at The Eye Care & Surgery Center.
Researchers reporting in the March 2012 issue of Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, the Journal of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology found that by using wavefront analysis to measure the indices from the corneal and ocular wavefront it was possible to identify very mild forms of ectasia that may be undetected by more routine corneal topography measurements. This gives the LASIK doctor more information about the possible subtle finding of Form Fruste Keratoconus, which should serve as a contraindication to having LASIK.

“As LASIK surgeons one of the most important things we can do is to make sure each and every patient we see for consultation is going to get the best possible results. This means using all the tools available to us right up front to determine the patients’ suitability and appropriateness for LASIK. Sometimes this means we turn patients away-but we have to be sure we always do the right thing,” noted Corneal Specialist and Baltimore LASIK Specialist Brad Spagnolo, M.D. of Baltimore Washington Eye Center.

LASIK Cost & Price Misconceptions

There are many misconceptions about LASIK prices and costs that seem to have caused those considering LASIK Surgery to wonder about what to expect about the cost and whether they are getting a good price. First, there have been lots of misstatements, many of which were promoted during the push for Obamacare-saying things like “the cost of LASIK has come down greatly”. The authors, editors and advisors of www.seewithlasik.com and its associated blog have been involved in Laser Eye Surgery for the correction of nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism since well before its FDA approval and thus have had direct access to years of market research, trend analysis and actual LASIK cost and price tracking since 1994. In fact, the cost of LASIK has not actually decreased on an out of pocket basis. It has tended to drift slightly up or slightly down, but the reality is that the cost of LASIK to the patient, on average, is and has been around $2,000 +/- $500 per eye for the past 15 years. The variance reflects the local geographic market conditions and promotional pricing behavior of certain practices and corporate entities attempting to build LASIK procedure market share.

Now, during that period of time the costs of the practice or LASIK center to deliver LASIK have actually increased as a result of the continual reinvestment in laser technology, laser service, staffing costs, facility rental and upkeep costs, cost of patient payment plans and general operating expenses. So, in terms of LASIK surgeon compensation the actual fee to the LASIK doctor may very well have decreased. One cost of LASIK delivery that has decreased considerably is the cost of advertising and patient acquisition. As practices began to develop meaningful word of mouth referrals from satisfied patients, their direct out of pocket costs for costly broadcast and print media declined as they purchased less and less and relied on happy LASIK patients to send more LASIK patients for consultation. In addition the growth of digital communications has made the cost of LASIK advertising more moderate in most cases. So, the notion that LASIK prices have come down is simply a misconception. They are stable with some slight market drift and reflect a fair value for the potential to have freedom from the hassle of eyeglasses and contacts to see at distance. They may have seem to come down because they haven’t gone up-like food prices, gas prices, car prices and almost all other consumer goods and services. But, no, LASIK costs were and are a fair value at where they have been and where they still are.

Friday, April 6, 2012

Monovision LASIK & 3-D Movies

Question: I have a question about seeing 3-D movies after monovision LASIK surgery. This is probably a dumb question but...I have had monovision surgery and I'm wondering if that will impact the visual effects when watching a 3-D movie?


Answer: Monovision LASIK is effective for a great number of patients who have presbyopia and near vision focusing problems-typically after 40 years of age-and who wish to have their range or intermediate and near vision preserved after LASIK. The monovision LASIK procedure corrects the dominant eye for distance and sets a closer working distance in the non-dominant eye by, in essence under correcting and blurring that eye for distance. Stereopsis or stereovision, as illustrated by viewing a 3-D movie does require a certain degree of clarity in order to be fully appreciated. It is different for different people AND it depends on the degree of blur that has been induced and is tolerated. There is a threshold of clarity required, but you may only be slightly blurred in order to achieve the monovision effect. So, if in your monovision LASIK correction you were blurred with a +1.50 D add effect you might still have pretty decent stereopsis whereas if you were blurred with a +2.50 D add effect you might lose it completely. This is really situation specific to the individual, so you will need to try it for youself.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

LASIK Results for Poor Vision

Question: If my eyesight and vision is 20/200 can a LASIK Surgeon give me LASIK to help me get back to at least 20/40-20/70?

Answer: Whether or not LASIK can help improve your uncorrected vision from 20/200 to 24/40-20/70 depends on a number of factors. First, what is the level of your current BEST correctable vision with either eyeglasses or contact lenses? Does it approach 20/20 or are there other reasons that your vision is not fully correctable, such as amblyopia? Successful LASIK Surgery requires that your vision be decreased as a result of nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism and that you be free of any other eye diseases or conditions that contribute to your vision problems, such as diseases of the Retina, like Macular Degeneration (AMD), Diabetic Retinopathy, Cataracts or diseases of the Cornea such as Keratoconus. Your next step is to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation, so that they can examination your eyes, evaluate your expectations and make a recommendation as to whether LASIK might be right for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.