Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Lens Replacement & Implants for Farsightedness

Question: I am now so farsighted that I can’t see well either at far or near without glasses. Am I a candidate for lens replacement surgery?

Answer: In general, people who are farsighted and require glasses for both seeing clearly at distance and for near vision-and who have otherwise healthy eyes do quite well with Lens Replacement Surgery and Multifocal Lens Implants. This will depend on your age and the types of tasks that you use your eyes for and require clear vision for. That said, your best next step is to find a Cataract Surgeon who is also a Refractive Surgeons and schedule a consultation to evaluate your individual needs and situation. Yours sounds like it is worth pursuing.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.


Multifocal Lens Implant for One Eye

Question: What is the experience and success among people who have a multifocal lens implant in only one eye and a monofocal lens implant in the other eye? 

Answer: Multifocal lens implants are complex optical designs and are generally recommended to be used in both eyes in order to obtain the best possible near vision results. If you really had only modest near vision needs and more demanding far vision needs it might be possible to use a multifocal lens implant in one eye with the express understanding that you would be compromising the potential near vision. We are not aware of statistics or clinical studies that implanted a multifocal lens implant in one and a monofocal lens implant in the contralateral eye-sorry.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Eye Exams after LASIK Surgery

Question: I had LASIK Surgery 12 years ago but have not seen an eye doctor or had an eye exam since my surgery. What type of follow up is recommended?

Answer: As a matter of course-whether you have had LASIK or not-it is prudent to have regular eye exams in order to maintain your eye health and vision. Depending on your age and your general health-as well as your family history of eye disease such as glaucoma and macular degeneration the frequency of eye exams should be at least every one to two years if not more often depending on the above health considerations. For someone who has had LASIK it would be preferable for you to return to the eye doctor who performed your LASIK Surgery if at all possible as they will have the most complete set of records and measurements for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, September 20, 2012

LASIK & NEAR VISION LOSS

Question: I am 57 years old, and nearsighted and can read perfectly without correction.  I currently wear one monovision contact lens for correction.  Recently, my eyes are getting very tired as I do a lot of computer and numbers work. If I have LASIK on both eyes to correct my distance vision, will I lose the ability to read without reading glasses?

Answer: If you are indeed nearsighted of a degree that allows you to see well up close for reading and you correct both eyes by any means-including LASIK-you will be rendering your eyes optically corrected for seeing clearly at distance and thus will no longer be "nearsighted". This will result is a loss of you near vision for reading. On the other hand, if you are now starting to be uncomfortable and feeling fatigued while reading with a monovision contact lens, it is likely that will experience the same symptoms with monovision LASIK. Thus, your best next step is to schedule a consultation with a LASIK Surgeon who is also a Cataract and Lens Implant Surgeon as exploring the option of Multifocal lens Implants may give you the results you desire.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, September 17, 2012

GPC & LASIK Eye Surgery Results

Question: I have GPC and would like to have LASIK. How will this affect the results of my laser eye surgery? What are my chances of getting a successful outcome? I also have astigmatism in one eye. I am 21 years old. When is the soonest I can get my eyes surgically corrected? I was told age 25.

Answer: First, regarding the age at which you can have LASIK Eye Surgery-most if not all LASIK Surgeons would perform Laser Eye Surgery for a 21 year old patient if they met all of the other criteria regarding eye health, prescription stability, corneal health, thickness, shape and integrity, tear film quality and quantity and systemic health. Many in fact might actually perform LASIK at an earlier age-as low as 18 years old if the criteria were met. Regarding the presence of GPC-you do not indicate whether it is due to contact lens wear or some other allergic reaction. This may or may not be important. In general, once the GPC has quieted down and not in an acute phase of reaction with excessive mucous production and/or itching-it is not likely to impact the results of a LASIK Eye Surgery procedure. Your best next step is to schedule a LASIK consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and have a thorough examination and consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Complex LASIK Surgery after RK

Question: As someone who has had the RK surgery in the early 90's should LASIK be an option for me today or is the risk too high at age 52? Second, I wish to know if it is good practice to correct one eye for nearsightedness and one eye for farsightedness.  I am unsure if one can adjust to one eye doing all the work for both near/farsightedness.  How will this affect people long term?  How long will the correction last before another surgery is required?

Answer:  Whether or not to have LASIK or any type of corneal Laser Eye Surgery after RK really depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you are attempting to obtain a monovision correction and no further distance correction really may make for a difficult result if the RK is not stable-which it tends not to be. So, stability and residual refractive error are some things that need to be considered. Further, depending on the location and the depth of the incisions used for the RK, it may only be possible to perform a surface ablation procedure such as PRK, rather than a lamellar procedure such as LASIK. In addition, the kind of work and activities that you perform and the degree and precision of near vision correction also weigh into the decision of whether corneal laser eye surgery with monovision or perhaps even a multifocal lens implant procedure might provide the best results. Your situation requires a consultation with an eye surgeon who is a specialist in corneal, laser, cataract and refractive surgery in order to deal with the various complexities and goals that you have. You should find a LASIK Surgeon who is preferably a Corneal Specialist and is also an experienced Refractive Cataract Surgeon in order to fully explore all of the possibilities.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, August 13, 2012

Houston LASIK & Eye Care Mobile Web Site

The Eye Clinic of Texas, a leading Houston LASIK and Ophthalmology practice is pleased to announce the launch of its new LASIK Laser Eye Surgery and eye care mobile web site. Patients who use an iPhone, Android or any mobile smartphone or computer tablet like an iPad and wish to learn more about LASIK or Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction, or who want to schedule a Free LASIK Consultation can simply search The Eye Clinic of Texas and click through to get information and dial the practice directly with the touch of a finger. 

If you are at a desktop computer and want to use a regular phone to schedule an appointment reach us at 800-423-3937 or for greater detail and more in depth information visit The Eye Clinic of Texas or to just be social come see us at facebook.com/ecot.lasik.

Friday, August 3, 2012

LASIK, Cataract & Multifocal Lens Implant

Question: I had LASIK in 2004 and now have a cataract that needs to be removed in the eye that had a near vision monovision correction. Is it possible to have the multifocal lens implant IOL after LASIK or just stay with monovision? 

Answer: Cataract Surgery and Lens Implants after LASIK can be a little tricky in terms of the precision of the measurements and calculations of the Lens Implant power. Multifocal Lens Implants can also be a little tricky, but more important certain Multifocal Lens Implants can decrease contrast sensitivity-which can be quite annoying in LASIK patients who may also have some slight decrease in contrast sensitivity. Given that you have had good success with monovision, the conservative approach would be to stick with it. However, there may be other considerations and the best thing to do is make sure that you have a consultation with a Cataract Surgeon who is also a LASIK & Refractive Surgeon as they will most likely have the depth of instrumentation to most precisely do the measurements, calculations and recommendations for you. 

Important Note: The information presented on the About Cataract Surgery Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask Cataract Surgeons section on aboutcataractsurgery.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to Cataracts, Cataract Surgery or Lens Implants. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask Cataract Surgeons section of aboutcataractsurgery.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and Cataract Surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Astigmatism & Near Vision


Question: I have astigmatism and was wondering if after LASIK surgery would I need glasses to read?
Answer:  Assuming that the astigmatism that you have is regular and the cornea is healthy, LASIK should be pretty effective in correcting the vision problem associated with the astigmatism. Now, if you are of an age or approaching an age where you would normally be expected to need reading glasses or bifocals-say around 40-then even with the LASIK surgery correcting the astigmatism you will still need help reading for the near vision problem called presbyopia. Your best next step is to schedule a LASIK consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon you can find in your area and have all of the necessary measurements and consultation performed. From this he or she will be able to make the most appropriate Laser Eye Surgery recommendations to address your situation and expectations.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section ofwww.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, July 30, 2012

Maine LASIK & Eye Care Mobile Web Site

Eyecare Medical Group, a leading Maine LASIK and Ophthalmology practice is pleased to announce the launch of its new LASIK Laser Eye Surgery and eye care mobile web site. Patients who use an iPhone, Android or any mobile smartphone or computer tablet like an iPad and wish to learn more about LASIK or Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction, or who want to schedule a Free LASIK Consultation can simply search Eyecare Medical Group and click through to get information and dial the practice directly with the touch of a finger. 

If you are at a desktop computer and want to use a regular phone to schedule an appointment reach us at 888-374-2020 or for greater detail and more in depth information visit Eyecare Medical Group or to just be social come see us at facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup

Monday, July 23, 2012

Baltimore LASIK & Eye Care Mobile Web Site

Baltimore Washington Eye Center, a leading Baltimore LASIK and Ophthalmology practice serving patients from throughout the greater D.C. area, is pleased to announce the launch of its new LASIK Laser Eye Surgery and eye care mobile web site. Patients who use an iPhone, Android or any mobile smartphone or computer tablet like an iPad and wish to learn more about LASIK or Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction, or who want to schedule a Free LASIK Consultation can simply search Baltimore Washington Eye Center and click through to get information and dial the practice directly with the touch of a finger. 

If you are at a desktop computer and want to use a regular phone to schedule an appointment reach us at 800-495-3937 or for greater detail and more in depth information visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center or to just be social come see us at facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Boston Eye Care & LASIK Mobile Web Site


D’Ambrosio Eye Care, a leading Boston LASIK and Ophthalmology practice serving the greater Boston and central Massachusetts area is pleased to announce the launch of its new LASIK and eye care mobile web site. Patients who use an iPhone, Android or any mobile smartphone or computer tablet like an iPad and wish to learn more about LASIK or Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction, or who want to schedule a Free LASIK Consultation can simply search D’Ambrosio Eye Care and click through to get information and dial the practice directly with the touch of a finger.

If you are at a desktop computer and want to use a regular phone to schedule an appointment reach us at 800-325-3937 or for greater detail and more in depth information visit D’Ambrosio Eye Care or to just be social come see us at facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare.

Monday, July 16, 2012

NJ LASIK & Eye Care Mobile Web Site

The Eye Care & Surgery Center, a leading NJ LASIK and Ophthalmology practice serving patients from throughout New Jersey, is pleased to announce the launch of its new LASIK Laser Eye Surgery and eye care mobile web site. Patients who use an iPhone, Android or any mobile smartphone or computer tablet like an iPad and wish to learn more about LASIK or Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction, or who want to schedule a Free LASIK Consultation can simply search Eye Care & Surgery Center and click through to get information and dial the practice directly with the touch of a finger. 

To review The Eye Care & Surgery Center mobile web site, use your smartphone to visit m.newjerseyvision.com. For greater detail and more in depth information visit The Eye Care & Surgery Center or to just be social come see us at facebook.com/eyecareandsurgerycenter 

META TITLE: NJ Eye Care & LASIK Mobile Web Site 

META KEYWORDS: mobile web site, eye care and surgery center, eye care and surgery center mobile web site, NJ ophthalmology, NJ eye care mobile web site, NJ lasik mobile web site 

META DESCRIPTION: The Eye Care & Surgery Center in NJ announces the launch of its new eye care & LASIK mobile web site. Use your smartphone to search Eye Care and Surgery Center and click to visit us.

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

LASIK & Sjogren’s Syndrome

Question: I have a couple of questions about having LASIK and Sjogren’s Syndrome and dry eyes. I wear soft contacts due to astigmatism-left eye 2.00 and right eye 2.25. At a routine annual medical checkup my ANA tests came out positive for something so I inquired further and it turns out I am positive for Sjogren’s AB (SS-A) Syndrome ABS. The max is 1.0 and my result is 1.2. I'm very interested in LASIK Surgery but I'm not sure I'm a candidate, am I? I have no symptoms of anything such as dry eye.


Answer: It is not really possible to know whether you are a good LASIK candidate without a complete examination. The fact that you wear contact lenses is good but one wonders whether your astigmatism is regular or irregular and might indicate some underlying clinical problems related to your testing mentioned above. Your concern about whether you would be a good LASIK candidate if you have sub clinical Sjogren’s Syndrome is one that should be addressed during a thorough LASIK consultation, preferably with a Corneal Specialist who can evaluate the ocular surface and tear film as well as the general health of the cornea specifically the shape, structure and thickness. Dry eye after LASIK would indeed be a concern and should be carefully considered.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Eye Infections & Acne Medication

Researchers reporting on eye infections and acne medication in Archives of Dermatology collected data on nearly 15,000 teens and young adults taking isotretinoin to treat acne and compared their rates of eye infections to group that had acne but was not taking the drugs and to a third group that didn't take the drugs and didn't have acne. Isotretinoin is also sold under the brand names Roaccutane, Amnesteem, Claravis, Myorisan and Sotret.

Within a year of starting the medication, nearly 14 percent of those in the acne medication group developed an eye infection or dry eyes, compared with almost 10 percent in the group that had acne but did not take the medications and about 7 percent in the group that didn't have acne.

Compared to the acne-free group, those taking isotretinoin were at 70 percent increased risk of an eye infection over the course of a year. The mean age of participants was about 16.5 years old.

“The most common problem was conjunctivitis, an inflammation or infection of the membrane lining the eye and eyelids. About 4 percent of teens taking isotretinoin developed conjunctivitis, compared with 2 percent of those without acne and not taking the medication,” remarked Baltimore Ophthalmologist & Corneal Specialist Brad Spagnolo, M.D. of Baltimore Washington Eye Center.

“Other problems included hordeolum (or stye, an inflamed oil gland on the edge of the eyelid); chalazion (a tender, swollen lump in the eyelid due to a blocked oil gland); blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelash follicles), dry eyes or eye pain further explained Dr. Spagnolo.

Isotretinoin treats acne by reducing oil production from the sebaceous glands, among other effects. But isotretinoin also disrupts function of the meibomian glands, or oil glands inside the eyelids. The meibomian glands help keep the eyes lubricated. Less lubrication may mean the eyes are irritated, itching and burning, prompting people to rub them and introduce bacteria. The good news is that most side effects of the drugs can be prevented using artificial tears to keep the eyes lubricated, experts said.

Contact Lenses, Dry Eyes & Tear Film Quality

Dry eyes as a result of contact lenses adversely affecting tear film surface quality (TFSQ) can be a very real problem for both rigid and soft contact lens wearers. Researchers reporting in the May 2012 Eye & Contact Lens: Science & Clinical Practice demonstrated that both rigid and soft contact lenses negatively impacted the TFSQ in both natural and suppressed blinking conditions with no significant differences found between the lens types and materials. “This research is important to keep in mind when contact lens wearers present for LASIK consultations since the evaluation of the tear film quality and quantity is a critical consideration of determining the patient’s candidacy for any type of Laser Vision Correction-but especially for LASIK surgery,” commented Baltimore LASIK Surgeon & Corneal Specialist Brad Spagnolo, M.D., F.A.C.S of Baltimore Washington Eye Center. “Given that a significant number of our patients electing to have LASIK today are indeed contact lens wearers and that dry eye is probably the most common side effect of LASIK that we see with our patients, we need to be aware that some of the pre LASIK tear film abnormalities that we find are actually due to their contact lens wear and that, with a sufficient amount of time without contact lens wear, many contact lens wearers who want LASIK will recover a normal tear film surface quality and be able to proceed with Laser Vision Correction,” noted Fairfield County LASIK Surgeon & Corneal Specialist Leslie Doctor, M.D. of Doctor & Associates with offices in Norwalk, Westport and Wilton, CT.

Contact lens patients considering LASIK or any type of Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction are encouraged to find the best LASIK Surgeons in their area and have a thorough evaluation, examination and consultation in order to find out if they are good candidates.

Sunday, May 20, 2012

LASIK with Connective Tissue Disease

Question: I would like to know if I am eligible for LASIK if I am ANA positive and have what the Rheumatologist calls undifferentiated Mixed Connective Tissue Disease.

Answer: Although there are probably LASIK Surgeons who would consider treating you, the conservative approach would be to avoid having LASIK or any type of Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction and instead consider whether you might be a better candidate for some type of Lens Replacement Surgery. The risk/benefit ratio is simply not sufficient to warrant taking the chance of an untoward event that could create a loss of vision.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, April 23, 2012

LASIK & Rigid Contact Lenses

Question: How long before having LASIK do you have to stop wearing  rigid gas permeable contact lenses?

Answer: While LASIK for Rigid Gas Permeable Contact Lens wearers can be an excellent option for vision correction, patients do need to understand that the long term wear of contact lenses-especially rigid contact lenses-does cause changes to occur within the Cornea, its shape and curvature, its thickness and the actually eye surface with regard to the tear film. If at all possible your LASIK Surgeon will want to have all of those changes, if any, revert back to a more normal and stable condition prior to having LASIK Surgery. The length of time it takes for these changes to reverse is really a function of how long you have been wearing the contacts overall, how much and what type-regular or irregular-change in BOTH curvature and shape have occurred in the Cornea and to what extent there are changes to the tear film stability and integrity-all of which can vary widely based on the contact lens fitting characteristics. Further, all of these changes vary from individual based on how rigid-ocular rigidity-the eye itself is. So it is very complex. Some LASIK Surgeons apply a simple rule of thumb as a guideline for patient education that states patients must have their rigid contact lenses out one week for each year that they have been wearing contacts. THIS IS A GUIDELINE. Most of the time it is possible for the LASIK Surgeon to be able to measure stability and consistency of the curvature and shape after some 6 weeks or so-but this does vary. The best results with LASIK are achieved when the quality and consistency of the measurements is VERY stable. Your LASIK Surgeon will ask you to come in for multiple repeated visits to determine when that stability has been achieved and then once achieved you should be able to have LASIK almost immediately thereafter.


Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, April 16, 2012

Blurry Vision after Cataract Surgery

Question: I had cataract surgery and a lens implant about 2 weeks ago and my vision is blurry and has not cleared. It is like the cataract is still in my eye. The cataract surgeon doesn't seem to be concerned. What should I do and why did this happen?


Answer: It is impossible to tell you why your visual recovery from Cataract Surgery is not quicker as you do not know whether there may have been some complication during Cataract removal or what the overall health of your eye is, including the Cornea and the Retina. However, what we can tell you is that you should carefully follow the instructions given by your Cataract Surgeon. Some blurry vision 2 weeks after Cataract Surgery is possible is there is Corneal swelling, inflammation, certain reactions of the Retina and other situations that can sometimes occur after Cataract Surgery. If you are uncomfortable with the information your Cataract Surgeon is sharing, then it is never inappropriate to find the best Cataract Surgeons near your home and schedule an appointment for a second opinion.

Important Note: The information presented on the About Cataract Surgery Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask Cataract Surgeons section on aboutcataractsurgery.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to Cataracts, Cataract Surgery or Lens Implants. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask Cataract Surgeons section of aboutcataractsurgery.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and Cataract Surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monovision LASIK after Regular LASIK?

Question: Can you have Monovision LASIK after traditional LASIK to correct Presbyopia?

Answer: It may be possible to have Monovision LASIK after you have had traditional LASIK whereby both eyes were corrected for seeing at distance under certain circumstances and conditions.

First, if there is some degree of residual nearsightedness this would be helpful. Depending on the degree of near vision correction that is necessary to correct the Presbyopia, it may possible to perform a hyperopic LASIK in the non dominant eye to render it "nearsighted". This will depend on the shape and thickness of the cornea, the amount of correction required and the presence of an adequate and healthy tear film as well as your overall health. Upon examination and careful measurements by a LASIK Surgeon it would be possible to review the likelihood of achieving the desired result and ascertain the risks of either needing to create another "flap" or lift the current flap in order to perform the treatment.

Your next step is to schedule an appointment with the best LASIK Surgeon you can find and have a consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Hidden Costs of LASIK

Beware of low LASIK prices with hidden costs you don’t know about. LASIK costs are affordable for almost anyone who wishes to minimize their dependence on or even eliminate the need for eyeglasses and contact lenses to see at distance. BUT-there are many patients who shop for the best price for LASIK and end up getting an unpleasant surprise. “Reputable and trusted LASIK surgeons tend to quote fees for LASIK that are comprehensive fees-that is they include everything you need to have LASIK and its associated evaluations and follow up care-regardless of your prescription,” commented Baltimore LASIK Surgeon and Corneal Specialist at Baltimore Washington Eye Center.

Discount LASIK centers that offer the lure of the best price for LASIK often quote a price for LASIK that is right on the edge of being deceptive in that it uses the lowest price to draw you in for an evaluation and get you excited about the possibility of having LASIK but then presenting you with hidden costs and fees. These hidden costs and fees can include an additional fee for your prescription that was not within the advertised range, it can include an extra hidden cost of LASIK for astigmatism, it can include an additional hidden cost for follow up care, it may include an extra hidden cost for custom wavefront LASIK or an add on hidden cost for enhancements-and on and on. Hidden costs and fees for LASIK are somewhat typical of the sales and marketing practices of certain discount centers. LASIK is surgery. You should choose a LASIK surgeon based on their reputation as recommended by friends and relatives and NOT based on the best price. Choosing a LASIK surgeon based on the best price alone could set you up for a number of hidden costs you can’t even understand and end up costing you more in the long run.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

LASIK Wavefront Screening & Keratoconus

“We have been using wavefront analysis as part of our LASIK evaluations for many years to help us assess any optical irregularity that might indicate a subtle form of keratoconus,” commented NJ LASIK Specialist Joel Confino, M.D. a New Jersey Corneal Specialist at The Eye Care & Surgery Center.
Researchers reporting in the March 2012 issue of Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, the Journal of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology found that by using wavefront analysis to measure the indices from the corneal and ocular wavefront it was possible to identify very mild forms of ectasia that may be undetected by more routine corneal topography measurements. This gives the LASIK doctor more information about the possible subtle finding of Form Fruste Keratoconus, which should serve as a contraindication to having LASIK.

“As LASIK surgeons one of the most important things we can do is to make sure each and every patient we see for consultation is going to get the best possible results. This means using all the tools available to us right up front to determine the patients’ suitability and appropriateness for LASIK. Sometimes this means we turn patients away-but we have to be sure we always do the right thing,” noted Corneal Specialist and Baltimore LASIK Specialist Brad Spagnolo, M.D. of Baltimore Washington Eye Center.

LASIK Cost & Price Misconceptions

There are many misconceptions about LASIK prices and costs that seem to have caused those considering LASIK Surgery to wonder about what to expect about the cost and whether they are getting a good price. First, there have been lots of misstatements, many of which were promoted during the push for Obamacare-saying things like “the cost of LASIK has come down greatly”. The authors, editors and advisors of www.seewithlasik.com and its associated blog have been involved in Laser Eye Surgery for the correction of nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism since well before its FDA approval and thus have had direct access to years of market research, trend analysis and actual LASIK cost and price tracking since 1994. In fact, the cost of LASIK has not actually decreased on an out of pocket basis. It has tended to drift slightly up or slightly down, but the reality is that the cost of LASIK to the patient, on average, is and has been around $2,000 +/- $500 per eye for the past 15 years. The variance reflects the local geographic market conditions and promotional pricing behavior of certain practices and corporate entities attempting to build LASIK procedure market share.

Now, during that period of time the costs of the practice or LASIK center to deliver LASIK have actually increased as a result of the continual reinvestment in laser technology, laser service, staffing costs, facility rental and upkeep costs, cost of patient payment plans and general operating expenses. So, in terms of LASIK surgeon compensation the actual fee to the LASIK doctor may very well have decreased. One cost of LASIK delivery that has decreased considerably is the cost of advertising and patient acquisition. As practices began to develop meaningful word of mouth referrals from satisfied patients, their direct out of pocket costs for costly broadcast and print media declined as they purchased less and less and relied on happy LASIK patients to send more LASIK patients for consultation. In addition the growth of digital communications has made the cost of LASIK advertising more moderate in most cases. So, the notion that LASIK prices have come down is simply a misconception. They are stable with some slight market drift and reflect a fair value for the potential to have freedom from the hassle of eyeglasses and contacts to see at distance. They may have seem to come down because they haven’t gone up-like food prices, gas prices, car prices and almost all other consumer goods and services. But, no, LASIK costs were and are a fair value at where they have been and where they still are.

Friday, April 6, 2012

Monovision LASIK & 3-D Movies

Question: I have a question about seeing 3-D movies after monovision LASIK surgery. This is probably a dumb question but...I have had monovision surgery and I'm wondering if that will impact the visual effects when watching a 3-D movie?


Answer: Monovision LASIK is effective for a great number of patients who have presbyopia and near vision focusing problems-typically after 40 years of age-and who wish to have their range or intermediate and near vision preserved after LASIK. The monovision LASIK procedure corrects the dominant eye for distance and sets a closer working distance in the non-dominant eye by, in essence under correcting and blurring that eye for distance. Stereopsis or stereovision, as illustrated by viewing a 3-D movie does require a certain degree of clarity in order to be fully appreciated. It is different for different people AND it depends on the degree of blur that has been induced and is tolerated. There is a threshold of clarity required, but you may only be slightly blurred in order to achieve the monovision effect. So, if in your monovision LASIK correction you were blurred with a +1.50 D add effect you might still have pretty decent stereopsis whereas if you were blurred with a +2.50 D add effect you might lose it completely. This is really situation specific to the individual, so you will need to try it for youself.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

LASIK Results for Poor Vision

Question: If my eyesight and vision is 20/200 can a LASIK Surgeon give me LASIK to help me get back to at least 20/40-20/70?

Answer: Whether or not LASIK can help improve your uncorrected vision from 20/200 to 24/40-20/70 depends on a number of factors. First, what is the level of your current BEST correctable vision with either eyeglasses or contact lenses? Does it approach 20/20 or are there other reasons that your vision is not fully correctable, such as amblyopia? Successful LASIK Surgery requires that your vision be decreased as a result of nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism and that you be free of any other eye diseases or conditions that contribute to your vision problems, such as diseases of the Retina, like Macular Degeneration (AMD), Diabetic Retinopathy, Cataracts or diseases of the Cornea such as Keratoconus. Your next step is to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation, so that they can examination your eyes, evaluate your expectations and make a recommendation as to whether LASIK might be right for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Saturday, March 31, 2012

LASIK Consultation & Surgery-Wait Time?

Question: How long do I have to wait between my LASIK consultation and my LASIK surgery and my eyes are ready to go. This is with both eyes being done of course.

Answer: The waiting time between your LASIK consultation and LASIK surgery can vary from no time, to many weeks, depending on the results of your consultation. If your consultation demonstrates a normal health tear film, stable corneal curvatures and a stable prescription, then you can proceed immediately with being limited only by the LASIK Surgeon and the scheduling their individual logistics. If your tear film is deficient in any way and requires a ''tune up" requiring artificial tears, insertion of tiny punctal plugs, or prescription eye drops to help you make more tears-you may have to wait until the LASIK Surgeon confirms that your tear film is adequate. Likewise, if there is any distortion, curvature change or irregularity of the shape of your cornea as the result of wearing contact lenses, you may have to wait until it stabilizes. Last, if your refraction is unstable or variable, you also may have to wait until it is repeatable and stable. All of these factors would be considered as part of your LASIK consultation. Your next step is to find the best LASIK Surgeon you can in your area and schedule that consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, March 30, 2012

Multifocal Lens Implant & Astigmatism

Question: Can you have a multifocal lens implant if you have astigmatism? What else would an eye surgeon need to do because of the astigmatism?

Answer: At the present time in the U.S., there are no commercially available Multifocal Lens Implants that are also Toric Lens Implants and also correct astigmatism-they are still considered investigational and are in clinical trials for FDA approval, but are available in some countries outside the U.S. It is somewhat unpredictable as to when they will be available in the U.S.

There are three options for correcting astigmatism, if you are having a Multifocal Lens Implant. One, is to wear eyeglasses with the astigmatism correction-which probably isn't terribly desirable. Another, depending on the type and degree of astigmatism you have, is to have Limbal Relaxing Incisions (LRI) and a third option, is to have a Laser Eye Surgery procedure such as LASIK after the Lens Implant to correct the astigmatism. The best thing to do is to find the best LASIK Surgeon who is also a top Cataract Surgeon and schedule a consultation so that all of the measurements can be taken and they can make a proper recommendation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Dry Eyes & Dry Mouth-Same Problem?

“When my patients-especially women-complain about dry eyes, I am careful to always ask them about dry mouth symptoms as well as achy joints,” stated Connecticut Ophthalmologist and Corneal Specialist Leslie Doctor, M.D. of Doctor & Associates in Fairfield County CT. “Sometimes they give me a funny look when I explain that dry eye and dry mouth symptoms may be related.”


"Patients might not be aware that if they have dryness in their eyes and mouth, along with fatigue or pain and swelling in some of their joints, could indicate a condition called Sjögren’s syndrome,” commented Corneal Specialist and Massachusetts Ophthalmologist Keegan Johnson, M.D. of Center for Sight in Fall River.

“Sjögren’s syndrome is thought to affect some 4 million people in the United States-so we do see it in everyday practice. While it can be found in men and women, the vast majority of patients with Sjögren’s syndrome are women in their 50’s and 60’s,” reported Dr. Leslie Doctor. “Statistically Sjögren’s syndrome is nine times more likely to occur in women.”

“In Sjögren’s syndrome, the body’s immune system can attack moisture producing cells throughout the body-the eyes, mouth, joints and even other internal organs can be affected. As a corneal specialist, I will assess the health of the ocular surface but I may also request consultation with an oral disease specialist or a dentist experienced with dry mouth and a rheumatologist, who can manage and coordinate the patient’s care,” stressed Dr. Johnson.

Sjögren’s syndrome is a chronic condition, and there is no cure. However, coordinated care and treatment by ophthalmologists who are specialists in dry eye and eye surface disease, dentists who are specialists in dry mouth and rheumatologists who specialize in the immune system can improve symptoms, make patients more comfortable and prevent problems like cavities and eye infections.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

LASIK Surgery with Dry Eyes?

Question: I am booked in to have LASIK next week (prescription -3.5 and -2.75). However, during my consultation I was told that I currently have dry eyes (although I don't feel as if they are dry, except when wearing contact lenses), and I will likely need to take drops for up to six months after the procedure. I am concerned that the dry eye will be severe and continue for longer than six months. The other consultations did not mention that my eyes are currently dry. Is it ok to have LASIK if eyes are already dry?

Answer: There is some threshold of adequate tear film quality and quantity necessary to have successful and comfortable LASIK. If you have been wearing contact lenses comfortably for the most part, then it is not likely that your eyes are too dry, but perhaps are borderline dry eyes. In fact, some of this dryness may actually be due to the wearing of contact lenses. Contact lenses do alter the ocular surface and can cause dry eye problems by themselves. Now, it common and expected for many "normal" people to have dry eye symptoms after LASIK. If you have a borderline dry eye, it is probable that you will experience dry eye complaints after LASIK. If your tear film was terribly inadequate, your LASIK Surgeon would have either not recommended LASIK or prescribed some pretreatment, with either artificial tear drops, punctal plugs and/or Restasis eye drops, in or to "tune up" your tears. It is entirely possible that after your LASIK treatment you will require one or more of these to help with dry eyes. It is very important that you follow the specific instructions and recommendations of your LASIK Surgeon, who will be monitoring your healing and helping you to achieve a comfortable recovery with the best possible results.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Sunday, March 25, 2012

Best LASIK Price Shopping

Question: I have had a consultation and am recommended for LASIK eye treatment. I am e-mailing to get a price quote per eye. I am nearsighted -4.25 and am searching for the economically sound price.

Answer: Shopping for the best LASIK price by e-mail is a, no pun, "short sighted" path to successful LASIK Surgery. Choosing a LASIK Surgeon is the MOST important decision that you will make in obtaining the best possible results as well as a safe, effective outcome in terms of your overall patient satisfaction and future eye health.

LASIK is NOT like buying tires for your car.

The surgical skill, experience and interpersonal skills of the LASIK Surgeon are key to your satisfaction. What makes you think you are in a position to evaluate this through e-mail? The price for LASIK should simply NOT be the criteria by which someone chooses a LASIK Surgeon. If you cannot afford to find the best LASIK Surgeon with top notch staff and with whom you can quickly establish a trusting relationship during an individual consultation-THEN YOU SHOULDN'T DO IT!

Further, just because a particular LASIK Surgeon told you are a good candidate does not mean others would also find you a suitable candidate. Schedule as many LASIK consultations as you need to find the LASIK Surgeon that provides you with the best evaluation, answers all of your questions and takes the time necessary to ensure your ultimate success. Stop shopping for health care and eye surgery via e-mail.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, March 22, 2012

LASIK Enhancement & Flap Debris Problem

Question: I have undergone a LASIK enhancement 2 weeks ago and am told I have tear residue under the flap. I was told it would go away in 1-2 weeks but my vision is not improving at all. Will this go away? What if it doesn't go away? What then?

Answer: It is really not possible to comment too much with the limited information you have relayed, but there are some things that may be relevant to your situation.

First, LASIK is "lamellar" surgery-meaning that is performed between the layers of the cornea-and under a thin "flap". Whether during a primary procedure or a secondary procedure, such as a LASIK enhancement, there is always the possibility that debris or material can get trapped under the flap. You have described "tear residue" and we are uncertain as to what exactly this is. It could be oily residue-particularly if you have oily skin. It could also be a mucous type material that can also come from the tears-or it could be both. In either of these situations, the material does work its way out or reabsorb, typically with a month or so, at the outside-often quicker. You should begin to see some improvement within 1-2 weeks albeit perhaps slowly. If you do not, it might suggest that there is another type of potential problem, whereby some of the corneal epithelium has actually gotten trapped under the flap in addition to, or instead of the tear "residue". This is a more concerning problem and needs to be addressed by your LASIK Surgeon. If, after 1-2 weeks and certainly after 4 weeks, you are not seeing considerable improvement in your vision, you need to see your LASIK Surgeon for an examination and discuss what steps he or she suggests as this is the time limit that would reflect a prudent observation and self resolution timeframe.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

LASIK Surgery with Nystagmus

Question: I have mild nystagmus and would like to have LASIK surgery. About two years ago, I went to a LASIK eye surgeon to see if I was a candidate for LASIK and was told that it was possible. I know this won't get rid of the eye movement, but I just don't want to wear glasses if that is possible. Can I have LASIK and what is the best type of surgery to have?
Answer: In many instances, LASIK with nystagmus is possible. In order to determine whether you are still a good LASIK candidate, or if perhaps you might be better off with some other type of Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction such as PRK, it is necessary for you to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation. From the examination and measurements it will be possible to tell you if you should proceed and what you can expect in terms of success and to also identify what types of procedures would be most appropriate for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular, a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Saturday, March 17, 2012

LASIK vs. Lens Implants for Hyperopia & Presbyopia

Question: I want to know if I qualify for some type of vision correction surgery such as LASIK or maybe Lens Implants. My uncorrected vision for my right eye is 20/80 and my left eye is 20/50 and I have hyperopia, astigmatism and presbyopia and the beginnings of cataracts. I am 53 years old and had RK 30 years ago to correct my vision.
Answer: Although your case has some more complex elements, there might be a relatively straight forward path to follow to help you consider vision correction surgery. First, the fact that you have the beginnings of Cataracts makes you unsuitable for any type of Laser Vision Correction procedure such as LASIK. Further, LASIK would not be a great choice anyway based on your hyperopia and presbyopia, along with your previous RK. So, Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction should not be considered at all.

Now, the fact that you have Cataracts beginning suggests that in the foreseeable future you will need Cataract Surgery and Lens Implants. At 53 years old with hyperopia and presbyopia, Lens Implants can be an excellent method of vision correction. The only compounding factors are the degree of astigmatism, whether it is regular and to what degree it is correctable and if there is any great degree of progression of the hyperopia and the astigmatism. With Cataracts forming, this is actually a very good option to consider and avoids corneal surgery, which can be more complicated after RK. So, your best next step is to find the best LASIK Surgeon who is also a top Cataract Surgeon and is facile in dealing the extra complex measurements required for patients who have had previous RK. You might very well wish to find a Corneal Specialist who is also a Cataract and Refractive Surgeon and schedule a consultation. From the examination and consultation, they will be able to give you guidance in whether Lens Implants would give you the results you are  seeking.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, March 16, 2012

iPad, LASIK & Computer Vision Syndrome

What do the iPad, LASIK and Computer Vision Syndrome have in common you ask. Literally millions and millions of people have iPads-and this is likely to increase with the release of the new iPad 3. Literally millions and millions of people have had or are thinking about having LASIK-and this is likely to increase as we continue to see increases in consumer confidence and consumer spending as the economy slowly improves. A huge number of people who have LASIK are also iPad users and therein lies the connection to Computer Vision Syndrome.

“We know that after having LASIK Surgery some patients may experience dry eye symptoms that we can manage with a range of treatments from artificial tear eye drops, to tiny punctal plugs and even Restasis eye drops to help patients make more of their own tears,” commented NewJersey LASIK Surgeon and Corneal Specialist Joel Confino, M.D. of The Eye Care & Surgery Center. “Today, we live in a digital world in which we are constantly using computers, cell phones that essentially have tiny computer screens and now everywhere we look-iPads,” said Dr. Confino.

Computer Vision Syndrome is a form of eye strain from computer use associated with staring at computer screens, mobile phones, video games and reading devices including iPads. “Long periods of focusing on these electronic devices doesn’t cause permanent damage to your eyes but may induce dry and tired eyes-this is something to be aware of, if you have recently had LASIK or are considering LASIK,” remarked BaltimoreLASIK Surgeon and Corneal Specialist Brad Spagnolo, M.D. of the Baltimore Washington Eye Center. “It would be good to tell your LASIK Surgeon about the extent and duration of your iPad and overall computer use so that he or she can take the necessary steps to help you avoid dry eyes and computer vision syndrome after LASIK.”  

During your LASIK Consultation, always be sure to tell your LASIK Surgeon about all of your personal vision correction goals as well as any prescription, over the counter and other medications you might take, as well as your computer use and how you have integrated digital technology, such as mobile phone use, iPad use and other electronic devices into your everyday routine.

Thursday, March 15, 2012

LASIK & Harley Davidson Motorcycle Ride?

Question: How long after LASIK can I ride my Harley Davidson motorcycle?

Answer: With the approval of your LASIK Surgeon, it would be possible for you to ride your Harley Davidson motorcycle about two weeks after your LASIK Eye Surgery treatment with the provision that you MUST wear eye protection. In fact, anyone who is a motorcycle rider should ALWAYS wear eye protection that includes at a minimum goggles and/or a full face shield. This is even more important for patients who have LASIK for a few reasons. Motorcycle riding exposes the rider to fast moving particulates such as dirt, dust and road grime that cause considerable eye irritation. Further, being out with other vehicles means you are also exposing your eyes to exhaust fumes and other airborne pollutants and pollen, all of which can cause further irritation. Small pebbles and road debris are yet another source of eye injury-thus wear eye protection.

After LASIK we want to be sure that the ocular surface remains healthy and heals properly and that you are not inclined to aggressively rub your eyes. Riders really enjoy the feel of the wind-but that wind also dries out the surface of the eye which is important for continued healing. Thus, to avoid increasing the dry eye symptoms after LASIK, we must keep the wind and air blowing at a minimum-so please wear eye protection. Review and get clearance from your LASIK Surgeon-WEAR EYE PROTECTION-and enjoy the ride on your Harley!
Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, March 8, 2012

LASIK for Extreme Farsightedness

Question: I have a question about LASIK for extreme farsightedness. I have checked every couple of years to see if the technology has gotten better for my eyes. Can laser vision correction correct a contact lens prescription of +6.5 (farsighted)?

Answer: Your question regarding LASIK, or really any type of Laser Eye Surgery to correct extreme farsightedness, really is not a "technology" question but rather an "outcome" question about the safety efficacy and predictability of Laser Vision Correction for this type of correction. Technically there are lasers that can be programmed to correct your level of farsightedness. However, there are "outcome" reasons that Laser Eye Surgery may not be the best choice.

Depending on your age-younger, say less than 40 years old-there is a high likelihood of instability and regression of the highly farsighted prescription making it necessary to do enhancements-often more than once. This is more so the case with LASIK than with PRK, but it still a problem. When you are over 40 and in your 50's, there are better options for the high hyperopic correction that use Lens Replacement Surgery, which removes the crystalline lens and replaces it with a permanent Lens Implant.

This is much more predictable and since the crystalline lens is removed, it eliminates the possibility of developing a Cataract. Extreme farsighted patients seem to do much better, and are happier, with the stability and overall result, as compared to Laser Vision Correction. It would be worthwhile to find a top LASIK Surgeon who is also a top Cataract Surgeon and schedule a consultation to discuss whether this might be suitable for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Trends in BOTOX® for LASIK Patients


“The increasing trend of requests for BOTOX® from LASIK patients is not terribly surprising,” noted Greg Hofeldt, M.D., a Massachusetts Cosmetic Eye Plastic Surgeon at Center for Sight in Fall River, MA. “As the average age of LASIK patients has drifted upward into the late 30’s, early 40’s and even late 40’s-so has the interest in BOTOX®. When LASIK Surgeons successfully help patients reduce or even eliminate their dependence on eyeglasses-they tend to see themselves differently.”

“When my LASIK patients are seeing well without having their facial features “framed” by eyeglasses they often remark that they never noticed so many of the fine lines and wrinkles,” commented Massachusetts LASIK Surgeon & Corneal Specialist Keegan Johnson, M.D. of Center for Sight. “I am happy to schedule them to see Dr. Hofeldt to discuss their areas of concern,” said Dr. Johnson.

Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK is a method of vision correction that can help patients who are nearsighted, farsighted or who have astigmatism, become less dependent on or even eliminate the need to wear eyeglasses and contact to see at distance. BOTOX® Cosmetic is a type of non-surgical treatment that can be used to smooth fine lines and wrinkles. In order to determine if you are a candidate for LASIK Surgery or BOTOX®, or both, it is important to find a top LASIK Surgeon and an experienced BOTOX® physician and schedule an appointment.