Thursday, December 15, 2011

Dry Eye, Contact Lenses & Video Terminals

The use of video terminals by contact lens wearers may very well lead to dry eye according to researchers reporting in the December 2011 American Journal of Ophthalmology. Wearing contact lenses in an office environment and spending more than 4 hours at a visual display terminal may result in lower tear film volume with significant dry eye symptoms. The study determined contact lens wearers and long-term visual display terminal workers had significantly worse tear film than those who did not wear contact lenses or worked for shorter periods on visual display terminals. The type of lenses worn had no real effect on the severity of the dry eye however the presence an air conditioned environment did seem to worsen the symptoms.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Not a LASIK Candidate

Question: I was told I was not a LASIK candidate and want to find out if anything has changed. 5 years ago I had a LASIK consult and told me that my cornea was to thin and my eye "too football shaped" to be a LASIK candidate and to check back in 5 years as there are many advances in the field of laser eye surgery. I have had glasses very thick glasses since I been 5 and I am now 31. My eyes have always been magnified like I drank 200 cups of coffee with glasses and I would really be happy to just not even lose the glasses but maybe reduce the thickness of my lenses or make it so contacts are an option. I am very self conscious about my glasses and have lacked confidence due to my glasses. I have always felt people look at me cause my eyes are too big. Have they come up with anyway of fixing or improving my vision yet? I am very anxiously waiting for some kind fix for my vision. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you.

Answer: It is difficult to really know whether you are a candidate for any of the options for helping become less dependent or even independent of eyeglasses without knowing more about your prescription and eye health. But here is some information that may be helpful. It sounds as if you are extremely farsighted and possibly have considerable astigmatism from the description that you have given--although the fact that your cornea was too thin does not fit with this exactly. If you are in fact extremely farsighted or hyperopic, and if you have a moderate to a high amount of astigmatism, you would NOT be a good LASIK candidate or perhaps for any type of Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK. People with prescriptions such as this do much better in terms of outcome and long term results with Lens Replacement Surgery with a Toric Lens Implant to correct the astigmatism.

IF-big IF-you were indeed a candidate for this you would STILL need to wear eyeglasses for reading and seeing arm's length and close vision as the Toric Astigmatism Correcting Lens Implants do not yet correct presbyopia....but WILL in the relatively foreseeable future. IF on the other hand you are extremely nearsighted with astigmatism it may be possible to use a Visian™ ICL which works like an implantable contact lens and could be combined with a correction for astigmatism with LASIK to give you the best result. In any event, your next step is to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area who is also a top Cataract and Lens Implant Surgeon and to schedule a consultation so that together you can determine what, if any, of these options might be worthwhile for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

AcrySof® IQ Lens Implant Confusion

Question: I am a bit confused by the different types of AcrySof® IQ Lens Implants for Cataract Surgery. I have seen information about the AcrySof® ReSTOR® Intraocular Lens for implantation after Cataract Surgery but my Cataract Surgeon provided a pamphlet about the AcrySof® IQ. What is the difference so I can make a wise choice of lens implant?

Answer: Indeed the choice of Lens implants for Cataract Surgery can be a little confusing but here is what you need to know. AcrySof® IQ Lens Implants for Cataract Surgery are available in three different types or designs: AcrySof® IQ Aspheric Lens Implant (IOL), AcrySof® IQ Toric Lens Implant (IOL) and AcrySof® IQ ReSTOR® Lens Implant (IOL). The AcrySof® IQ Aspheric IOL corrects distance vision only after Cataract Surgery using aspheric optics to minimize spherical aberration so that patients experience crisper distance vision especially in dime illumination or under low contrast conditions such as overcast rainy days or at dusk. It does not correct arm's length or near vision. The AcrySof® IQ Toric IOL corrects distance vision including astigmatism after Cataract Surgery using toric optics. It does not correct arm's length or near vision. The AcrySof® IQ ReSTOR® IOL corrects distance vision AND arm's length and near vision after Cataract Surgery and is considered a Multifocal Lens Implant (IOL). Hope this helps.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Saturday, December 10, 2011

LASIK & PRK for Low Myopia

Question: My eye surgeon says I can have either LASIK Surgery or PRK. I have low myopia and astigmatism. Which is better-which should I do?


Answer: With careful patient selection, realistic goals and expectations and an experienced and skilled LASIK Surgeon, the results from both LASIK and PRK are virtually identical. LASIK patients tend to have a quicker visual and somewhat more comfortable initial few days after their treatment-but the final visual results are the same. Because LASIK requires the preparation of a "flap" it is a two step procedure and thus has a slightly higher side effect and potential complication rate. Ask your LASIK Surgeon to help you decide by asking what he would have in a case like yours.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Lens Implants instead of LASIK

Question: I have been told to have lens implants instead of LASIK. I have been examined by many eye surgeons for LASIK and have been told that they cannot do LASIK surgery because my cornea thickness is less than it needs to be. They have suggested doing a lens implant. Is this possible and what are the disadvantages?


Answer: Successful LASIK Surgery does require an adequate corneal thickness for proper results and long term eye health. Depending you your prescription and the thickness of the cornea it is in fact entirely possible that you are not a suitable LASIK candidate. For some patients wishing to be less dependent or independent of eyeglasses and contact lenses for seeing clearly at a distance it is sometimes possible to use different types of Lens Implants to correct the vision. For moderate to highly nearsighted patients it is sometimes necessary to consider using a Visian™ ICL, which functions like and implantable contact lens-and we suspect this is what your eye doctors are recommending. With proper patient selection, the Visian™ ICL can provide good vision for nearsighted patients and outside the United States can also be used to correct both nearsightedness and astigmatism. Lens Implants are intraocular surgery and thus have the associated risks of any intraocular surgery which tend to be somewhat greater than those of corneal surgery such as LASIK. That said, if multiple eye surgeons are providing you with the same information it is most likely the case that you should consider other alternatives to LASIK in order to achieve your vision correction goals.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

Military LASIK & Refractive Stability

Question: I am currently deployed and know that with the military I get free LASIK Surgery. My vision two years ago was -5.00 and -5.25. I just took a eye exam before I deployed 2 months ago and my vision is -6.00 and -5.75. Is my eyesight too bad to get LASIK and how bad can your vision be until your not able to get LASIK.

Answer: First, THANK YOU for your service to our country and your dedication to the safety and protection of the United States of America and its citizens. With regard to your having LASIK, this is certainly an excellent consideration for someone like yourself who is likely to be hindered or even incapacitated by trying to wear eyeglasses or contact lenses under adverse and perhaps even combat conditions. At the current level of your nearsighted correction it is entirely possible that if your eyes are otherwise healthy in terms of the corneal shape and thickness and quality and quantity of the tear film-along with a normal retina and optic nerve-that your prescription is within the treatable range. However, what might exclude you from having LASIK at this time is the fact that your right eye seems to still be progressing and increasing in myopia a bit more than some LASIK Surgeons might be willing to accept. The best course of action is to schedule a LASIK consultation when you can at a Warfighters Laser Eye Center and the eye surgeon there will be able to make that determination for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Sunday, December 4, 2011

Time Off Work after LASIK

Question: If I work at the computer 8-9 hours a day how long would I have to be off work after having a LASIK surgery?


Answer: Assuming that you had a routine LASIK Eye Surgery treatment it would be normal and expected for you to return to work within a day or two with the following caveat. Dry eyes after LASIK are a very common and normal temporary post treatment complaint and for that reason patients are required to keep their eyes well lubricated with artificial tear eye drops and may also require insertion of tiny tear duct plugs or other prescription medication to help them produce enough tears during the healing period. Using a computer exacerbates dry eye complaints with or without LASIK because it slows down your blink pattern. So, find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and fully discuss what your work at the computer requires. From that information and the findings of your consultation he or she will recommend the best course of pre and post LASIK care to help you get the best results.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.