Monday, October 31, 2011

Cataract Surgery after LASIK

Question: If I get LASIK Eye Surgery now, can I have another eye surgery in the far future such as Cataract Surgery? My Grandmother had Cataract Surgery and was told if you have had LASIK Surgery, you cannot have Cataract Surgery.


Answer: If you have LASIK Surgery when you are younger and then develop a Cataract as part of the normal aging process when you grow older there is NO reason that you cannot have Cataract Surgery to correct your vision. It is helpful if when you have LASIK now, that you keep a copy of your preoperative measurements as these are quite useful to the Cataract Surgeon in doing the calculations for Lens Implant that is used as part of cataract surgery to correct your vision. having LASIK does make the measurement and calculations for Cataract Surgery Lens Implants (IOL) somewhat more difficult but using advanced imaging and measurement technology along with having the original pre LASIK eye exam results can reduce any difficulty a top Cataract Surgeon might experience.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Military LASIK & the Marines USMC

Question: I am seeking information about LASIK surgery and being in the Marines (USMC). I am looking to enlist in the marine corps maybe 5 years from now. I am currently 17 and was wondering what time would be best to get LASIK, if at all. I've read there are many restrictions and waivers to be signed and I wouldn't want to disqualify myself from deployment if this surgery is prohibited. I've heard as well that age plays a major role in determining this operation's safety (21 seems to be the popular vote amongst forum frequenters). I wear currently wear contacts, -3.00 in my left and -2.5 in my right and would certainly not want to deal with glasses during BT. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Answer: Performing the duties of a Marine can indeed be a real hassle wearing contacts or glasses. The various environments, weather conditions, need to use night vision goggles, aiming devices and on and on make it tough to wear contact lenses or glaases. Having LASIK and being in the Marines (USMC) is generally not a problem. However there are several things to consider. People who are involved in activities where there is a great deal of facial contact-such as kick boxing, wrestling, possibly basketball-are often counseled to opt for PRK Laser Eye Surgery rather than LASIK in order to correct their vision. Depending on your role in the Marines (USMC) this may be something to consider.

The reason the age of 21 is regarded as a starting point is to allow for the prescription to be stable. Most people require until 21 for their prescriptions to stop changing. Some actually require that they wait until a later age to allow for their prescriptions to stop changing. You should note that certain schools such as Special Forces, HALO and SCUBA may have unique requirements and require waivers if you will have LASIK. You should also note that virtually any active-duty and activated National Guard and Reserve soldiers-Army, Navy, Air Force or Marines-are eligible for Laser Eye Surgery under the Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program (WRESP) if they meet certain criteria. Your best course of action is to fully discuss the situation with the recruiter and a WRESP LASIK Surgeon.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

LASIK with Corneal Dystrophy

Question: I was told by eye doctor that I was not a candidate for LASIK because I have a Corneal Dystrophy? What can you tell me.


Answer: In general, in order to be a LASIK candidate you should be in good overall health and have normal, stable eye health especially with regard to the health and condition of the Cornea. This means a Cornea free of disease, scars or conditions that might cause any sort of atypical healing of the Corneal. In addition the Cornea should be of normal and sufficient thickness and shape and you should have an adequate supply of healthy tears with a stable optical prescription. Corneal dystrophies present in many variations including Basement Membrane dystrophies, Map-Dot-Fingerprint dystrophy, Lattice dystrophy, Fuch's dystrophy and even Keratoconus represents a form of Corneal dystrophy-so there are a wide variety of Corneal Dystrophies. Generally patients with Corneal Dystrophies are not considered good LASIK patients but with some types that are called "Anterior Basement Membrane Disease" are sometimes candidates for other types of Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction. Your most appropriate course of action is to schedule a consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon you can find who is ALSO a Cornea Specialist. He or she will be able to provide a definitive diagnosis as well as lay out what options might be possible.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK Lifetime Guarantee & Monovision

Question: I have a question about the LASIK lifetime guarantee and monovision. I had LASIK surgery around 7 to 10 years ago. I am now turning 45 and in need of readers all the time. I was never given the option of monovision LASIK at the time I did my surgery. Would I still be a candidate now? Would this be covered under the LASIK lifetime guarantee I paid for or considered a different surgery?


Answer: As we all enter our mid 40's we begin to develop a normal near vision focusing problem called Presbyopia. This condition is a normal and expected part of getting older and can often be helped using the technique of Monovision LASIK.

If you had LASIK in your mid to late 30's and your distance vision was well corrected, the fact that you need "readers" now at 45 is expected. It might be possible to "induce" a small amount of nearsighted correction in your non dominant eye with another Laser Vision Correction procedure such as LASIK or another Laser Eye Surgery. The only way to tell is to schedule a consultation with your LASIK Surgeon or another top LASIK Surgeon if you so choose who will be able to carefully assess the shape, health and thickness of your Cornea and quality and quantity of your tear film as well as your likely tolerance to Monovision. Whether or not a Monovision LASIK procedure would be covered under a Lifetime Guarantee is entirely at the discretion of your original LASIK Surgeon in accordance with the terms and conditions under which it was sold to you.

In general LASIK Lifetime Guarantees only cover enhancements for distance vision changes that are NOT due to other factors such as Cataracts. 95+% of all LASIK enhancements for distance vision are identified with the first 3-6 months after the initial LASIK procedure and thus paying for any sort of LASIK Lifetime Guarantee is somewhat of a scam as trusted LASIK Surgeons virtually ALWAYS provide any medically necessary enhancements with the first year after treatment at no charge.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

LASIK & Abrasions from Contact Lenses

Question: I have a question about having LASIK as I keep getting abrasions from my contact lenses. I wear contacts mostly and glasses when I need them. I have problems with the contacts if I wear them when I sleep even though my eye doctor assured me this is ok for about a week at a time. So I try to give my eyes a rest and my contacts some solution once a week. Lately I have been getting abrasions on my left eye about once a month bad enough to not be able to wear my contacts for several days. I am not sure why it happens. So what to do? I am tired of being in pain, and as I drive for my job every day I have trouble the times where I am so light sensitive I can hardly crack an eye open. Then pain for several days. What can I do about this? Is LASIK right for me?


Answer: First, STOP wearing your contact lenses as you are doing as you are exposing yourself to a considerable amount of risk. The risk of sight threatening corneal infection with contact lens wear during sleep and with corneal abrasions increase exponentially. There is obviously something very wrong with your contact lenses, the health of your cornea, the health of your tear film, the condition of your eyelids, the health of they eye's surface or all or some of the above. One or more of these factors may have contributed to the to your current state of contact lens intolerance. Nonetheless at the moment you are at considerable risk to say nothing of the discomfort you experience. You need to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and eve perhaps find one who is a Corneal Specialist and get a careful examination of the health of your eyes and tear film. During this process they will be able to advise you as to whether and when LASIK might be an option for you. Your eyes need to have a stable prescription, a sufficient and healthy tear film, a healthy normal cornea with a proper shape and thickness and you need to be in good general health. Once these items have been evaluated LASIK Surgery might be a good option to help you be independent of eyeglasses and not have to wear contact lenses.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, October 17, 2011

Find LASIK Surgeons for Flex Plan Benefits

This is the time when you need to quickly find a LASIK Surgeon for your Free Consultation if you are having LASIK and want to use a Flex Plan Benefit or Flexible Spending Account (FSA). Flex Plans make LASIK cost affordable. They allow you to have pre tax money taken out of your paycheck a little at a time to pay for LASIK. This LASIK benefit is like having pre-tax interest free easy payment plan for LASIK from your employer! However you need to hurry because your employer only gives you a limited time to tell them how much to withhold---and that date is approaching! If you are considering LASIK you need to find a top LASIK Surgeon and schedule a Free Consultation to find out if you are a good candidate. Once you know if you are a candidate then you tell your employer how much to take out of each paycheck and then you can schedule your LASIK treatment date in January. The important thing to do right now is to find a LASIK Surgeon and schedule your Free Consultation.

Monocular Double Vision after LASIK

Question: Our son had LASIK 1-2 years ago and now reported that he has been having blurry vision and double-vision off and on for about the last 4 months in his left eye. He didn't think too much of it at first, blaming it on tired or strained eye. He went to his eye doctor that did the LASIK Surgery, has had blood tests and an MRI-there was nothing seen behind his eye in the MRI. The problem is also that his left eye-ball sticks out about 3 millimeters more then his right-eye. That's reason for blood tests and MRI. He is to see his eye doctor on Tuesday to discuss result of all tests. Can you give me some insight as to what this problem he has could be?

Answer: Although it is impossible to really tell what might be causing the complaints without an examination or results of testing, it does sounds like the LASIK Surgeon your son is seeing is taking a careful thorough path to finding the cause. We do not know your son's age, but the onset of double vision or diplopia of any type is reason for concern. You state that the double vision is in the left eye. It does need to be confirmed that the double vision is occurring in one eye rather than when both eyes are open. Monocular versus binocular diplopia can have different causes. You state that you can physically determine that the left eye "sticks out 3 millimeters further than the right eye." Without examination and measurement we do not know whether the eyeball itself is actually protruding or it appears to "stick out" because the Cornea is too curved and protruding-these have different causes. So, the eye doctor your son is seeing will carefully evaluate the actual physical location of the eye in its socket, the pupils, the color vision, the eye muscles, the retina and especially the shape and thickness of the Cornea to determine if they are all normal and might be contributing to the problem. In addition the eye doctor will be looking at the blood work for any signs of systemic problems such as thyroid disease or diabetes that might be contributing as well as possibly ordering a visual field test to test the function of the visual pathway overall. So, as you can see it must be determined whether it is the eye itself, the visual pathway and nerves or a systemic problem that is causing the problem.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Sunday, October 16, 2011

LASIK for Accountants

Question: I am 24 years old, planning to have LASIK. My work as an accountant demands lots of reading and long hours of working on the computer. Should I reduce my readings and computer after the LASIK, or is it irrelevant?

Answer: Working on a computer or reading for prolonged periods of time should not pose any increased risk or discomfort after LASIK as long as you were a good LASIK candidate prior to the eye surgery. You need to be sure that your prescription is stable, you overall eye, corneal and systemic health are good and you MUST have a sufficient quantity of stable healthy tears. Prolonged near vision tasks challenges the tear film as we simply do not blink often enough and are subject to develop dry eye complaints even without LASIK. Thus, make sure that you tell your LASIK Surgeon about your work so that he or she can consider the health of your tear film carefully and perhaps even take increased measures to keep your tear film healthy during the period after you have your LASIK Surgery.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Eye Problems LASIK Solves

Question: I have a question about LASIK. What are the eye problems the LASIK solves? And, will I suffer from any of those problems in the future after the LASIK?

Answer: LASIK Eye Surgery is used to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism to help people see more clearly without being totally dependent on eyeglasses or contact lenses. In certain instances using a technique called Monovision LASIK, LASIK Surgery can help with some near vision focusing problems for those patients suffering from presbyopia which is associated with the normal aging process. LASIK is NOT a preventative procedure and thus if you were going to get more nearsighted you will get more nearsighted. If you were going to develop presbyopia you will still become presbyopic.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, October 14, 2011

LASIK and Increasing Nearsightedness

Question: I have a question about LASIK and increasing nearsightedness. I am 25 years old and nearsighted. I understand this problem continues to increase until the age of 30. If I have LASIK now will my nearsightedness continue to worsen until I am 30 or should it stop after the LASIK?


Answer: The progression of nearsightedness or myopia typically ends closer to the early to mid 20's than 30. Although, depending on the type of work performed and other genetic and health factors it can increase into the 30's. In order to be a good LASIK candidate optical correction that is not progressing. LASIK does not really influence the progression of myopia and one should not expect the normal myopic changes that would have otherwise occurred to cease after LASIK.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK & Reading Glasses

Question: I am nearsighted and wear contact lenses which work well to correct my vision. However, I must wear reading glasses to read if I have my contacts in. If I remove my contacts I can read, very well, up close. If I have LASIK surgery to fix my nearsightedness, will I need reading glasses?


Answer: If you have LASIK it will correct your vision just as your contact lenses do and so you will need to wear reading glasses unless you opt to have monovision LASIK. With monovision LASIK it is possible to slightly under correct your non dominant eye so that it helps with your near vision and arm's length vision. The most appropriate step is to find a LASIK Surgeon and schedule a consultation and discuss the monovision LASIK option.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK Monovision for Near Vision

Question: I have nearsightedness of -1.75 each eye and starting to suffer from presbyopia and near vision problems. Is LASIK Surgery an option for me? I don't think I would be interested in a lens implant. Also, does insurance pay any cost towards the surgery?


Answer: While LASIK is primarily used to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism to help people be less dependent or even eliminate the need for glasses for seeing at a distance, there are applications of LASIK that are useful and pretty successful for helping with presbyopia and near vision correction. The most typical way is to employ a monovision LASIK procedure where by calculating a planned under correction in the non dominant or "near vision" eye it is possible to enhance the rage of arm's length vision and near vision. There are a number of complex presbyopic LASIK procedures that include using aspheric treatment shapes and multifocal treatment zones but these have gotten much acceptance due to considerable variability in results. Your next step is to schedule a consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon you can find in your area and from the examination and results they will be able to tell you more about whether the monovision LASIK might work for you. In addition they will be able to check your specific insurance plan to see if there is a LASIK benefit for you. It will be helpful when you attend your LASIK consultation if you could have a close approximation of the distances you need to see more clearly at for the eye surgeon to possible "test" this with contact lenses to see how you respond.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

LASIK Surgery for Trifocal Eyeglasses

Question: I have a question about LASIK and trifocals. I am 53 years old. I have been wearing trifocal glasses for about 15 years. I went from not wearing glasses at all to trifocals. I have nerve damage in my left eye and it does not dilate properly. Am I a candidate for LASIK at all??


Answer: You do not say whether you are dependent on the trifocals to see clearly at distance as a primary correction or whether the trifocals are primarily to help you arm's length and near vision. LASIK Eye Surgery is primarily used for correcting distance vision rather than replacing bifocals or trifocals. There are however Multifocal Lens Implants for vision correction used for Lens Replacement Surgery that might be more suitable in your situation. A good next step would be to schedule a consultation with an eye surgeon who is both a top Cataract Surgeon as well as a top LASIK Surgeon and have an evaluation so he or she can make recommendations regarding your options.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK Parameters for Nearsightedness

Question: What are the parameters for which the LASIK surgery cannot be performed? I have nearsightedness of 1.75 diopters in the right eye and 2.00 in the left one. This eye problem happened over the course of the last 5 to 6 years, as before that my vision was perfect. I am now nearly 25 years old, so if I do have LASIK, to what degree can my vision can improve?


Answer: Good LASIK candidates are those people at least 18 years old with stable prescriptions who have good overall health, good corneal health, shape and thickness and who have healthy and plentiful tears. In addition good LASIK candidates have realistic expectations of LASIK Surgery and what can be achieved and they have personal vision correction goals that go beyond simply wanting to see better without glasses or contact lenses. Last, they thoroughly understand the potential risks, complications and side effects of LASIK. Your prescription is certainly within the customary treated range and one would expect a good result. The only way to really determine if you are a candidate and how well you will do is to find the best LASIK Surgeon you can and schedule a consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Display Terminals and LASIK

Question: I am 37 year old Radiologist with astigmatism and myopia 5.00. Consider my occupation and working in front of screen on CT and MRI for more then 10 hours a day do you recommend LASIK Eye Surgery.

Answer: If you and your eyes are otherwise healthy, have an acceptable corneal thickness, shape and curvature, adequate tear film quality and quantity you should be a good LASIK candidate. Many people spend their work hours on display terminals and do quite well with LASIK. But, the only way to tell is by having a thorough examination and consultation with a top LASIK Surgeon. The key will of course be your ocular health, condition and tear film integrity.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, October 10, 2011

LASIK & Near Vision Correction

Question: Can I correct both my extreme nearsightedness (-9) as well as my recent presbyopia with LASIK Surgery?

Answer: The technical answer to whether LASIK can correct presbyopia is "sort of". First lets discuss whether you would be suitable for LASIK Surgery at all given your extreme nearsightedness. At -9.00 you are certainly within the programmable range of the lasers used today. However, whether you can have LASIK or any Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction is going to depend on the health and shape of your cornea as well as its thickness. A -9.00 correction requires a significant amount of tissue removal and this means that you have to have an adequate corneal thickness. Along with this of course you need a healthy and sufficient tear film and good ocular, retinal and overall health. Now-regarding the recent onset of presbyopia and near vision problems-it is possible to use a monovision correction for many patients even with high myopia to obtain a reasonable amount of presbyopia correction. You should approximate this with contact lenses first however. there are a number of "multifocal" laser procedures either in clinical trials or being used on an experimental basis throughout the world and the U.S. For some low degrees of myopia the results are "okay"-for a challenging highly myopic patient our counsel would be to avoid them at this time. Find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation-then you will be able to fully explore your candidacy and alternatives.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Good LASIK Candidate?

Question: I have a question about whether I am a LASIK candidate. I am going to be 18 this coming December and have worn glasses since I was 8 or 9-they are thick. I am a boxer and I am going to join the military? Can I be a LASIK Surgery candidate?

Answer: Let's talk about your age first-being 18 is the really the absolute minimum age and what really matters is whether your eyeglass prescription is stable or changing. If it is stable then you are in good shape. You don't say whether your "thick glasses" are for farsightedness or nearsightedness. If they are for farsightedness it could be a problem-likewise if you are extremely nearsighted and your cornea is not sufficiently thick this too could make you a poor candidate. Various branches and schools within the military may have slightly different requirement however entering the military after LASIK is not a problem unless you are going into certain areas of SCUBA or HALO training or certain flight programs. That said it would be important to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and around your 18th birthday schedule a LASIK consultation at which time after a full examination or measurements it will be possible to tell if you are a good LASIK candidate or perhaps a candidate for another Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction. Because you are a boxer and subject to a fair amount of facial impact it is quite possible that you will be better off with another form of Laser Vision Correction such as PRK.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Will the maximum amount that I can contribute to my employer's medical flexible spending account shrink next year?

Here's how to take advantage of an FSA before the amount you can contribute to one is lowered in 2013.


QUESTION: Will the maximum amount that I can contribute to my employer's medical flexible spending account shrink next year? I recall hearing that the contribution limits will change.

ANSWER: Actually, the rules won't change until 2013, when the maximum amount employees can stash in a medical FSA will be capped at $2,500 per year (that limit does not apply to employer contributions). Currently the maximum limit varies by plan, but many employers allow employees to set aside $4,000 or more in these pretax accounts for medical expenses. You can sign up for your 2012 contributions during open-enrollment season this fall.

In light of the impending change, however, you can make the most of your FSA in 2012. If you've been thinking of having an elective medical procedure done that's not fully covered by insurance — such as laser eye surgery for you or orthodontia for your kids — you might want to schedule it before the FSA limit changes, so you'll have access to more tax-free money.

And, if you plan carefully, you may have an even bigger stash of tax-free money to use for out-of-pocket medical expenses during the first 2½ months of 2012 or 2013. If your employer extends the deadline for using FSA funds to March 15 of the following year, rather than December 31, you can combine any funds remaining from the previous year with the entire amount you earmark for the current year — even though the full amount has not yet been deducted from your paycheck. If, for example, you have $1,000 left over from 2011 and you sign up to contribute $4,000 to your FSA for 2012, you may be able to use $5,000 in tax-free money to pay for out-of-pocket medical expenses from January 1 to March 15, 2012.

BY:  Kimberly Lankford, Kiplinger's Personal Finance — 09/13/11

Monday, October 3, 2011

LASIK Cost Affordable with Flex Plan

LASIK cost can be quite affordable by using employer sponsored Flex Plans or Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA). Flex Plans or Flexible Spending Accounts FSA) allow you to have money taken out of your paycheck over time to pay for LASIK. So-its like getting a pre-tax interest free easy payment plan for LASIK from your employer! Since the money is withheld tax free you even save more. If you are thinking about LASIK you need to find a top LASIK Surgeon and schedule a Free Consultation to find out if you are a good candidate. If you are then they can tell you how much to have set aside in your Flex Plan or FSA. Then you can schedule the actual date of your LASIK Surgery. The important thing to do right now is to schedule your Free Consultation so that you can see if LASIK is right for you. Your employer has a time limit on when you will be able to tell them to put money away for LASIK in January 2012 so get that appointment scheduled!