Sunday, July 24, 2011

LASIK for Corneal Neovascularization

Question: I have blood vessels getting really close to my cornea due to lack of oxygen. I do wear contacts. I read that LASIK may be the best option to resolve this problem. Is there a LASIK center that specializes in this area of expertise.


Answer: Corneal neovascularization is not uncommon among contact lens wearers. It can occur as result of chronic hypoxia-or not getting enough to the cornea-from long wearing schedules of contact lens wear over time, from the chronic irritation of the contact lens edge or just the physical presence of a foreign body, such as contact lens, in the eye. It does usually resolve upon the discontinuation of contact lens wear. The presence of corneal neovascularization, depending on the location and severity, does require that the LASIK Surgeon use a bit of extra caution in performing the LASIK Surgery procedure. If yours is so severe that you wish to take additional precautions it might be worthwhile choosing a top LASIK Surgeon who is also a Corneal Specialist. Finding the best LASIK Surgeon in your area who is a Corneal Specialist should allow you to have a successful experience.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Monovision LASIK Near Vision Enhancement

Question: I am 57 and had Monovision LASIK surgery in 2004. My distance vision remains good, however I'm now REALLY struggling to be able to read. Do I possibly have any options to have a 'redo'? If so, might I be facing this again in a few years as my vision continues to change.

Answer: Monovision LASIK is a good choice for some patients who suffer from presbyopia and need help with near vision and reading. Presbyopia is not static and the need for help with near vision continues to increase with age in most patients. Thus, what you are experiencing in terms of vision changes and the relative loss of effectiveness of monovision LASIK is to be expected over time. Whether you are able to have a LASIK enhancement to increase the effective reading vision is really dependent on the amount of additional correction needed, the shape, thickness and health of your cornea as well as the quality and quantity of your tear film in addition to other systemic factors that might impact the results-so it is possible. It is also possible that other options might be suggested that might be considered at 57 years old such as Lens Replacement Surgery. This may provide a more permanent solution whereby there is no additional degradation in near vision due to the continuing crystalline lens changes that cause presbyopia. Your best next step is to schedule a consultation with a comprehensive Refractive Surgeon who does BOTH LASIK Surgery and Cataract Surgery and Lens Implants as they will be able to fully assess the options with you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, July 18, 2011

Lattice Degeneration and LASIK

Question: Is LASIK contraindicated for moderate-to-severely myopic individuals with lattice degeneration? If not, are there any special procedures, precautions or considerations that the surgeon and patient should observe in these cases to prevent complications?

Answer: Lattice Degeneration is not an absolute contraindication for LASIK Surgery in moderate-to-severely myopic individuals. However, moderate-to-severely myopic individuals by the nature of the anatomy of their eyes are more prone to peripheral retinal degeneration such as Lattice Degeneration and thus may be at greater risk for Retinal Detachment, with or without having a LASIK procedure.The presence of uncomplicated Lattice Degeneration does not interfere with visual function and does not constitute a high risk for future development of Retinal Detachment. Lattice Degeneration complicated by tractional tears as the result of an acute, symptomatic posterior vitreous detachment represents a high-risk situation for future Retinal Detachment and is an indication for a Laser Retinopexy with or without the consideration of a LASIK procedure. Lattice Degeneration and atrophic retinal holes complicated by progressively increasing subretinal fluid represents an additional indication for surgical intervention. Thus as you can see, "Lattice is not Lattice"-it can vary in it's risk profile. That said, the conservative approach would be for the LASIK Surgeon to have the patient seen by a Retinal Specialist for a thorough peripheral retinal exam whereby the Lattice Degeneration could be determined to be "complicated" or "uncomplicated" and a decision to treat the area(s) prophylactically, or not, could be made. Once the Retinal Specialist has given a clearance for LASIK Surgery, then the LASIK Surgeon should be able to proceed.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, July 11, 2011

LASIK Surgery for Crossed Eyes

Question: I was wondering if there was a way to get LASIK Surgery and uncross my eyes?

Answer: LASIK Surgery is used to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and/or astigmatism to help people see clearly at distance. Crossed Eyes, or Strabismus is a condition related to a eye muscle imbalance that can have many causes-once of which can be farsightedness or hyperopia. LASIK Eye Surgery is not used to correct Strabismus, however in some cases of Accommodative Esotropia-eyes crossing due to high hyperopia-it is possible that LASIK could be used to correct the focusing error. Generally high hyperopia such as that causing Accommodative Esotropia is better corrected via alternative optical corrections as it often requires bifocals. In any other type of Strabismus or crossed eyes, it is not likely that LASIK would be an appropriate treatment.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, July 8, 2011

High Myopia, LASIK Surgery & The Military

Question: I am a 26 year old male and have been rejected for military service because of my eyesight. My prescription in my left eye is -13.5 D and my left eye is -14.5 D. Does this disqualify me from having LASIK Surgery?

Answer: Good LASIK Surgery candidates need to have stable prescriptions, healthy corneas of adequate thickness, normal and adequate tear film, good overall eye health and systemic health, normal cornea curvatures and shape as well as several other factors tat we know contribute to good results and patient satisfaction. The extreme degree of myopia or nearsightedness that you have relayed puts you very much at the limits of what LASIK can treat with high levels of long term confidence. It is not an absolute contraindication but you should also consider other alternatives such as lens implants as they may provide you with a more predictable and more successful long term result. Your best next step is to schedule a consultation with a top LASIK Surgeon who is also a comprehensive refractive surgeon and can evaluate you for the various options that might be possible.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, July 7, 2011

LASIK Follow Up Care

Question: How long is the waiting time between the initial eye exam and the actual LASIK Surgery procedure and what is the necessary follow up care schedule?

Answer: The actual time delay between the initial consultation and actual LASIK Surgery procedure can be quite minimal depending on the LASIK Surgeon preference. If the exam and findings are all normal and without any need to retest or reevaluate any aspects of the exam it is possible to do the actual LASIK procedure on the same day as the exam in some cases. In order to facilitate the shorter timing it is helpful where possible to alert the LASIK Surgeon office of this desire and where possible to provide any previous examination records. It is always necessary to have a follow up visit one day after your LASIK procedure and then sometimes at one week and then depending on how the results look at one month or three months, These reflect minimum follow up requirements and many surgeons do require more frequent visits after LASIK, The best thing to do is check with the LASIK Surgeon you choose to see what they might require in your particular instance.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Laser Eye Surgery after Cornea Transplant

Question: I had a corneal graft and lens replacement surgery with a lens implant to replace an opaque crystalline lens two years ago. The vision is good however I now require a +3 diopter correction axis 35 which compares unfavorably with a -1.00 D and no astigmatism in the other eye. I am tempted to seek either a revision of the replacement lens or laser surgery - even to improve if not cure!  I can appreciate the risks.  replacement lenses may not come out as easily as the originals and laser surgery on a graft might not be ideal - but what would you recommend? 

Answer:  Unfortunately there is much more clinical information needed to make a really meaningful recommendation. That said, with what you have relayed, another intraocular surgery to perform a lens exchange would not be a first recommendation-especially considering that we would suspect the astigmatism is secondary to the graft and suturing process and may not be totally regular and thus not get the best results from a lens implant for astigmatism. But we don't know enough about the astigmatism without additional testing. A less invasive, corneal surface laser eye surgery is most likely going to be able to reduce or eliminate the vast majority of the residual refractive error and do so with considerably less risk. It may not eliminate the total correction but could improve it a great deal. Your best next step is to seek the consultation of a top Laser Eye Surgeon who is also a Corneal Specialist-perhaps this is the person who performed your Corneal Transplant.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, July 4, 2011

LASIK with Glaucoma History in Family

Question: I am 26 years old and require a nearsighted correction of -4.00 D in both eyes. My mother and grandmother both have Glaucoma and use eye drops. Am I eligible to have LASIK Eye Surgery for the correction of myopia?

Answer: To be a good candidate for LASIK Eye Surgery requires more than just a certain degree of correction. Good LASIK candidates have an appropriate corneal shape and thickness, healthy and sufficient tear film, generally health eyes, stable prescriptions, do not have any systemic illnesses that might impact healing and the results, are not taking medication that might impact healing and tear film integrity and most importantly have realistic expectations. The fact that you have a strong family history of Glaucoma means that you must be carefully watched for Glaucoma, however if you do not currently have a diagnosis of Glaucoma this should not preclude you from having LASIK. You should seek consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and be sure to advise them of the family history of Glaucoma.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, July 1, 2011

LASIK after Contact Lens Infection

Question: I have pretty bad eyesight. My contact lens prescription -7.00 and -7.25 and I have scarring in my right eye from a contact lens infection. Are my eyes too bad LASIK surgery to correct to where I wouldn't need glasses?



Answer: LASIK Surgery can provide excellent results for a wide range of nearsighted correction including the higher end of "moderate myopia" that you have. You do have a significant amount of nearsightedness but it is well within the "sweet spot" of myopic corrections that LASIK is indicated for. However there are a number of other considerations. First your cornea's must be healthy and adequate in terms of their thickness and shape. The fact that you have scarring from a previous contact lens infection could, but not necessarily, pose a problem depending on the actual type of infection and the location and depth of the scar. Further, it would be important that you have a healthy, normal and sufficient tear film. Your best next step is to schedule a consultation with a top LASIK Surgeon in your area who can carefully examine your eyes and evaluate the corneal scarring and determine whether you are a good candidate and will get the results you are looking for.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.