Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Wavefront LASIK Results Compared

LASIK Surgeons compared two different types of LASIK Surgery to see if there were any clinical advantages to either one. Researchers reporting in the April 2011 edition of the Journal of Refractive Surgery compared the visual results of a group of 41 patients who were treated with Wavefront Guided LASIK in one eye and Wavefront Optimized LASIK in the other eye. Their LASIK procedures were performed in a prospective, randomized clinical trial format. Patients were included if they had up to 7 D of nearsightedness and 3 D of astigmatism and their vision and aberrations were measured at 1 and 3 months after their LASIK surgery. Both types of LASIK treatment provided similar clinical results. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment types in terms of overall visual acuity, increase or decrease in aberrations or contrast sensitivity.

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Multifocal Lens Implant for AMD

Question: My mother is 67 years old and has age related macular degeneration (AMD) and she went through the laser treatment for that twice. The treatment was performed 5 year ago. She has been fine since then but her vision has never been the same.


She developed a cataract in the same eye almost 2 year ago. Initially the eye doctors asked her to wait till the cataract grows. It’s been 2 years and the eye doctor has suggested that she should get the cataract surgery done. I have 2 questions.

1. She does not feel any discomfort- Should we still get the surgery done?
2. The eye doctor has said you can have a multifocal lens implant rather than a monofocal lens implant. But online I found that if you have AMD - bifocal cataract lens are not the best choice. Please advise.

Answer: You do not state the level of vision that your mother had after the laser treatment for Macular Degeneration. You also do not state what her level of vision is today with the Cataract and the Macular Degeneration. These would be important for you to understand so that you could get some approximation of what her best vision was as a result of the Macular Degeneration and then how much it has deteriorated from the formation of the Cataract.

It would not be expected that your mother would experience any “discomfort” from the development of a Cataract but it might be expected that she is disturbed by the loss of clarity, distortion of colors, glare and shadows that are common symptoms of Cataracts. It may also be that she had adapted to using the better eye without Macular Degeneration and without a Cataract as it is a much “better seeing” eye. This would explain her lack of Cataract symptoms.

In general the decision to have Cataract Surgery is made by the patient when the vision and symptoms are disturbing enough that they would like to see better. Sometimes however there are medical reasons that a Cataract Surgeon might suggest that a patient proceed with Cataract Surgery even if it doesn’t seem that bad. For example, some patients have a very “narrow iris angle” that can predispose the patient to narrow angle glaucoma if a Cataract becomes too large. Sometimes, the Cataract is just dense enough so as to blur the eye doctor’s view of the Retina and Macula, making it too difficult to effectively follow the health and stability of the eye and thus they recommend the Cataract be removed.

The use of multifocal lens implants (IOL) to correct near vision really requires a healthy Macula in most cases. Each multifocal lens design does have some optical compromise which is not typically compatible with Macular Degeneration. However there are exceptions and you should probably seek a second opinion from a top Cataract Surgeon in your area who will evaluate both the need and benefit of the surgery as well as the potential benefit of the multifocal lens in your mother’s case.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, April 25, 2011

LASIK for Astigmatism after Cataract Surgery

Question: I will be needing cataract surgery at some point and would like to know of use of LASIK following the IOL implants is option for correcting astigmatism rather than using one of the newer IOLs. And if so which is the better or at least more proven technology. My current prescription is RE +0.75-1.75 x 088 add +2.75 and LE PL-1.75 x 094 add+2.50


Answer: LASIK after Cataract Surgery to correct astigmatism is an option for those people who have residual astigmatism after their Cataract operation. Your current prescription indicates that you have preexisting astigmatism along with presbyopia-a common condition whereby the crystalline lens loses its ability to change focus causing you to have difficulty with near vision. It is possible to have a monofocal lens implant and NOT correct the preexisting astigmatism which would probably necessitate either wearing glasses or a second surgery-either LASIK Surgery or Limbal Relaxing Incisions (LRI) in order to see clearly at distance. A possible better solution might be to have a toric lens implant that would correct your astigmatism as part of the Cataract removal all in one procedure. However the decision to have a toric lens implant is based on several factors in addition to the prescription. If you are a good candidate for an astigmatism correcting lens implant (IOL) and you would not typically elect NOT to have one so as to require a second surgery such as LASIK. The best next step for you is to find a Cataract Surgeon who is also a top LASIK Surgeon who will provide an examination that includes some additional measurements including evaluation of the shape of your cornea and help you determine what the best options might be for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, April 22, 2011

LASIK vs. Contact Lenses: Patient Satisfaction Study

LASIK Surgery and Contact Lens patient satisfaction is being measured in a survey comparison through a multicenter multiyear initiative sponsored by the Cornea Research Foundation of America. There is a growing body of statistical evidence that suggests that the rate of nearsightedness or myopia in the United States has doubled in the past 20 years. As a result American children today are significantly more likely to require vision correction to see clearly. There is some speculation that the huge increase at the amount of time children spend viewing computers, hand held video games and other mobile electronic devices has put them at risk of developing myopia due to the increase in near vision focusing demand required by these devices.


However, the use of eyeglasses for myopia is not always the vision correction method of choice, as eyeglasses pose appearance and cosmetic issues, activity restrictions, optical limitations and peripheral vision restrictions for many people. As a result many nearsighted people choose contact lenses or LASIK eye surgery to correct their myopia. The Cornea Research Foundation of America has initiated a study to survey 10,000 patients who have elected to use contact lenses or LASIK for vision correction and to evaluate the relative patient satisfaction and complication rates of each type of myopic vision correction. Each participant will be evaluated by survey every 12 months for 3 years in order to determine their on-going satisfaction with their vision correction method and to collect contact lens problems or LASIK problems encountered in their real world experience. It is hoped that the LASIK vs. Contact Lens Patient Satisfaction Study will provide relevant and useful information about the relative safety profiles of these vision correction methods.

Monday, April 18, 2011

Multifocal Lens Implants and Peripheral Vision

Question: Does the AcrySof® ReSTOR® Multifocal Intraocular Lens Implant provide good peripheral vision or is it restricted as in trifocal glasses?


Answer: By virtue of their lens design and placement inside your eye, in general all intraocular lens implants (IOL) give "normal" peripheral vision. That is they do not restrict your side vision as the optical segments of a bifocal or trifocal eyeglass might do in certain situations. However, multifocal and accommodating lens implants each work by somewhat different optical principles and thus have certain benefits and limitations. Some provide better distance vision, some better near vision and some better intermediate or arm's length vision-or various combinations thereof.

Further, as each one uses a different optical design to achieve it's vision correction effect each one also may have unique limitations such as in certain lighting conditions or with certain pupil sizes. A specific"brand" of near vision presbyopia correcting lens implant should be chosen after considerable discussion with your Refractive and Cataract Surgeon. based on a thorough examination and discussion of you lifestyle needs and vision correction expectations. If you have not already done so you should schedule an appointment with one or more LASIK Surgeons in your area who are also known to be the best Cataract Surgeons as this is "lens" surgery and you want to consult and eye surgeon who is experienced in both types of surgery.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Contact Lens Discontinuation before LASIK

Question: I am thinking about having LASIK? What's the reason for not wearing my contact lenses 2 weeks prior to the LASIK Eye Surgery procedure?

Answer: In our society contact lenses have unfortunately been reduced to being treated like a commodity rather than the medical device that they actually. Most people don’t realize or think about the long term consequences of contact lens wear on the cornea and the surrounding eye tissue. Previous contact lens wear prior to LASIK can cause a number of changes to occur in the cornea that can impact the results of and predictability of LASIK Surgery as well as the ease with which you enjoy good stable vision. First, any contact lens is a barrier to unrestricted oxygen flow to the cornea. This is especially true if you sleep or even nap in your contacts. Hypoxia, “too little oxygen” results in swelling of the cornea. Even if you have no symptoms whatsoever it is likely that you have some baseline of mild corneal swelling when you wear contacts. Swelling of the cornea results in an artificial increase in cornea thickness. Corneal thickness is a key critical parameter and measurement used in the calculations for LASIK.

Thus, it is important to have a completely “swelling free” cornea from which the LASIK calculations are performed-THIS CAN REQUIRE NOT WEARING SOFT CONTACT LENSES FOR AN AVERAGE OF 2 WEEKS.

In addition, when the cornea swells during contact lens wear as a result of the swelling and the mechanical pressure of even a soft contact lens, there is often a shape change that occurs in the cornea. The shape of the cornea is a key critical component in the LASIK Eye Surgery algorithm and nomogram combination. Thus, it is important to have a completely “normal shaped” cornea from which the decisions about the LASIK procedure can made. THIS CAN REQUIRE NOT WEARING SOFT CONTACT LENSES FOR AN AVERAGE OF 2 WEEKS.

AND NOT WEARING RIGID GAS PERMEABLE LENS FOR 8-12 WEEKS AS THEY TEND TO DISTORT THE CORNEA SHAPE TO A MUCH GREATER DEGREE.

Last, contact lens wear disturbs the normal structure and adherence of the tear film and in some patients causes what is referred to as a “contact lens induced dry eye”-these are the people who use excessive amounts of lubricating drops during and after contact lens wear each day. The tear film is a critical part of the LASIK healing process and visual recovery. So, it is critical to let the ocular surface recover from contact lens wear prior to LASIK. Most LASIK Surgeons follow a strict contact lens removal protocol prior to LASIK Surgery and top LASIK Surgeons may even do a series of retesting to ensure that everything has normalized after contact lens wear.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Reversing LASIK for Near Vision Improvement

Question: Once you have LASIK surgery for nearsightedness, is it possible to have it changed so that you can see better up close and wear glasses if needed for far away?

Answer: If someone has had LASIK to correct their nearsightedness and distance vision and they then become presbyopic and need help seeing up close, under certain conditions it might be possible to perform a LASIK enhancement. It really depends on the overall condition of the cornea including its shape and thickness as well as the health of their eyes and how much correction needs to be reversed, the presence of any optical aberrations and astigmatism as well as the real risk:benefit ratio of a second surgical procedure vs. simply wearing reading glasses. Your should investigate this with your LASIK Surgeon who will need to take careful measurements in order to counsel you on the best course of action.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK Costs and Recovery Times

Question: How much does LASIK Surgery cost, and how long will it take to recover from LASIK?

Answer: The cost of LASIK is set by the individual LASIK Surgeon. There are many myths and misunderstandings regarding LASIK costs and it would be important to understand why there is a wide range of fees offered today and who seeking the best LASIK price is not always the prudent path. More important than the cost is choosing the best LASIK Surgeon. It is the LASIK Surgeon that determines the ultimate safety, efficacy and predictability of LASIK. You should seek a trusted and respected LASIK Surgeon in your area. Generally most top LASIK Surgeons provide easy payment plans so that you can get the best Laser Eye Surgery from a well respected local eye surgeon. While each person's overall LASIK experience is a bit different there is a general expectation that you will be able to resume almost all normal activities with a couple of days.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Post Partum Dry Eye and LASIK

Question: I saw my eye surgeon for a LASIK pre-op appointment this morning. My Schirmer test came back at a 5 in each eye. I haven't felt like I had dry eyes until the last couple of months, when I've been up at night with our newborn baby. The surgeon says it's probably just because of the lack of sleep and gave me some Restasis and recommended that I go ahead with the procedure later this week (but said it would be OK if I want to wait). If I go ahead, he said he would just give me plugs on the day of the surgery and continue the Restasis for a month or two after the surgery and that I'd be fine. I wonder if you might have a second opinion to offer on whether I should proceed or if I should wait (possibly months) until my baby sleeps better and I have a chance to see if it's sleep or something else?

Answer: Congratulations on your newborn baby! You do not say how long post partum you are at this moment or whether you are nursing the baby. As you know, pregnancy and nursing can have a significant effect on hormones. These hormones and specifically the shifts in estrogen levels are a known cause of dry eye. Further, as hormones shift they can also cause changes in corneal thickness and make the stability of LASIK a little less predictable. The treatment of your dry eye complaints with punctal plugs and Restasis sounds like a typical clinical path that produces good results. In many cases of patients with modestly dry eyes they have plugs and Restasis 2-6 weeks prior to their surgery date as it takes Restasis some 4 weeks or more to produce its full effects. The conservative course is to wait until your dry eye is treated and stable BEFORE proceeding with LASIK and for may it is required that you not be nursing for 3-6 months before LASIK to allow the hormones to be fully stable as well.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, April 11, 2011

LASIK Surgery Enhancements

Question: I had LASIK surgery a few years ago. I am beginning to experience the same headaches I had prior to the surgery. When I paid for this, I was told that there is a lifetime guarantee on the surgery. I believe I need a "touch up". When I first had it done, I could see my computer screen clearly and need reading glasses now to reach that. It is approximately 2 feet from my face.do I just have to call for an appointment?

Answer: Headaches are a complex symptom to diagnose and may or may NOT be related to your prescription or even your vision. While you have "self diagnosed" the "same" headaches, unless you are a physician-preferably an ophthalmologist, neurologist or neuro-ophthalmologist-you probably want to leave the diagnosis to someone else. Further, the decision to have what you refer to as a "lasik touchup" or LASIK enhancement is not made by the patient. It is a medical decision made by the LASIK surgeon based on the vision, the amount of residual prescription to be treated, presence of optical aberrations, the amount of residual corneal thickness, the corneal shape or topography and what the expected result to be achieved is. It is not a trivial decision like buying a new pair of eyeglass lenses. The fact that you need reading glasses to see intermediate distances like the computer screen does NOT necessarily suggest that correcting your distance vision through an enhancement is actually indicated. Without knowing your age, it suggests that you may be becoming presbyopic if you are approaching or are over 40 years old or that there is some other issue related to both the vision and headache complaints. Your next step is to immediately schedule an appointment with the LASIK Surgeon who performed your surgery. If for some reason they can not see you promptly schedule a consultation with a top LASIK Surgeon in your area who will be able to guide you on a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Saturday, April 9, 2011

Can LASIK Cure Halos?

Question: What can LASIK surgery cure other than near and farsightedness. I see haloes as well as bad vision and my eye doctor said that LASIK surgery can correct the haloes I see. Is that true?

Answer: LASIK Surgery is a type of Laser Vision Correction that can treat common refractive eye problems such as nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. In some cases it can be used to treat the minor near vision focusing problems from presbyopia, the normal loss of focusing due to age. Halos can occur for many reasons. Some people with high prescriptions and thick eyeglasses can see reflections and halos and reflections off the edges of their eyeglasses. If this is the case then a trial with contact lenses would allow the demonstration of the "edge free" optical effect before having LASIK. Typically using specialized coatings and materials in eyeglass lenses can also eliminate reflections and halos from thick eyeglass lenses. Halos can sometimes be caused by changes in the crystalline lens of the eye due to clouding of the lens-this may be the beginning of a cataract or could even been just a stable clouding of the lens that you have had from birth. LASIK probably would not be appropriate for this optical aberration. Halos can be caused by uncorrected astigmatism or other irregularities in the cornea. Irregularities in the cornea often cause high order aberrations to be present. A high order aberration called spherical aberration can cause glare and halos to occur that are not typically correctable with spectacles or soft contact lenses. If you have high order aberrations such as spherical aberration, Custom Wavefront Guided LASIK or Custom Wavefront Optimized LASIK can often correct or reduce the spherical aberration. These are only some examples of what might cause your halos-there are may more that might be related to other eye problems, conditions and diseases. You need to first understand the source of your halos and your eye doctor should then be able to explain why LASIK will treat the source of the halos. If your eye doctor is not a top LASIK Surgeon you should locate the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation in order to have a second opinion. A top LASIK Surgeon will be able to measure all of the optical aberrations in your eyes as well examine the health of your eyes to make sure they are free of disease and qualify you as a good LASIK candidate who will benefit from LASIK Surgery.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Can A LASIK Surgeon Fix Legal Blindness?


Question: I have terrible eyesight and an astigmatism. I am pretty sure I am legally blind in my right eye which also has the astigmatism. Is it possible to fix my eyes or at least make them better with laser eye surgery?

Answer: Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK is an appropriate type of vision correction for patients who are nearsighted, farsighted who may or may not also have astigmatism provided that their eyes are healthy and that they have realistic expectations. The term “legal blindness” describes a level of visual acuity of no better than 20/200 WITH BEST POSSIBLE CORRECTION. If in fact you are legally blind-that your vision is not correctable to better than 20/200- it is important to determine the reason for the reduced vision as this will help your LASIK Surgeon determine whether LASIK or any type of Laser Eye Surgery can be performed and with what potential level of improvement in vision. Many people get confused when their eye doctor tells them that they are “legally blind” without glasses. This is NOT legal blindness-it just means that they have poor eyesight as a result of a high degree of refractive error and need a strong eyeglass or contact lens prescription to see well. Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK and PRK can be appropriate for patients with moderate to high myopia (nearsightedness) and astigmatism if the patients eyes are healthy and their corneas have enough thickness. Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK and PRK may be appropriate for patients with low to moderate hyperopia (farsightedness) and astigmatism. Both high myopia and significant hyperopia may also be corrected using lens implants which might be more appropriate. Phakic Lens Implants such as the Visian ICL™ offer extreme nearsighted patients an option and astigmatism correcting toric lens implants can often be used to correct both astigmatism and hyperopia for patients. All this information is meaningless unless your eyes are healthy and free of disease. Your next step is to schedule a consultation with an eye doctor who is both a top LASIK and Cataract Surgeon. Given that you feel your eyes are as bad as they are you should find the best LASIK Surgeon and the best Cataract Surgeon in your area and have your examination to see what is possible in your specific situation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, April 1, 2011

LASIK Surgery With Strabismus

Question:
I am 23, and I have worn glasses or contacts since I was in 4th grade. My vision has remained unchanged over the last few years, and I am beginning to consider LASIK for vision correction. In addition to being nearsighted, I have astigmatism and strabismus. My strabismus is not severe, and I can control it. The only time my eyes (both are capable) drift outward is if I am significantly tired. Are you still able to perform LASIK on individuals with strabismus, or would that disqualify me? Thank you.

Answer:
LASIK Surgery for vision correction of nearsightedness and astigmatism is possible in a great number of cases, but not all. Your description is of a type of strabismus called Intermittent Exotropia--a condition that you believe only occurs some of the time, specifically when you are fatigued or tired.Usually it is possible to have LASIK even if you have strabismus IF you are not wearing much or any prism correction in your eyeglasses. As you report wearing contact lenses it will be important for a LASIK Surgeon to perform muscle balance testing both with eyeglasses and contacts to see if the potential for the strabismus to decompensate increases with contact lens wear, although this typically isn't the case unless there is a prismatic correction in the eyeglass prescription. Your next step is to find a top LASIK Surgeon and schedule a consultation. Please bring your current eyeglasses and any previous eyeglasses with you to the consultation, and also a copy of your current eyeglass prescription. By having this information at your LASIK consultation the eye surgeon will be able to do proper testing and determine if there is any reason your would not be a good LASIK candidiate.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK Eye Surgery Information & Surgeon Directory Appoints 2011 Editorial Advisors

North Andover, MA [April 1, 2011] -- "We are extremely grateful to the members of the 2010 http://www.seewithlasik.com/ Editorial Advisory Board who were so helpful in guiding us in providing insight and guidance into the selection of new topics and new information to present to patients regarding Laser Eye Surgery for Laser Vision Correction such as LASIK. For our 2011 advisor selection we identified the possibility of broadening our clinical scope by reaching out for the assistance of eye surgeons Leslie Doctor, M.D., Ravi Shah, M.D. and JoAnn Chang, M.D, all fellowship trained cornea and refractive surgeons," said Katherine Carlisle, Managing Partner of www.seewithlasik.com.


Leslie Doctor, M.D. is a Cornea, Cataract & LASIK Surgeon in Fairfield County, Connecticut. Dr. Leslie Doctor received her medical degree with honors from The Ohio State University School of Medicine followed by a residency in ophthalmology and a Fellowship in Cornea and Refractive Surgery at The Ohio State University Medical Center. She continues her dedication to the education of eye physicians and surgeons through her appointment as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut where she teaches advanced techniques of cataract surgery & intraocular lens implantation (IOL) to new eye surgeons.

Ravi Shah, M.D. is a Cornea, Refractive & LASIK Surgeon in Portland, Maine at Eyecare Medical Group. Dr. Shah is a corneal specialist specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of corneal disease, corneal transplantation using traditional cornea surgery and transplant techniques as well as advanced techniques such as DSAEK (Decement's Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty), and laser eye surgery for laser vision correction such as LASIK. Dr. Shah received his medical degree and completed a residency in ophthalmology at the University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) followed by a Fellowship in Cornea and Refractive Surgery at the Cleveland Clinic Cole Eye Institute.

JoAnn C. Chang, M.D. is a Cornea, Cataract and LASIK Surgeon serving greater Boston, Massachusetts at D'Ambrosio Eye Care. Dr. Chang earned her medical degree at The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine where she was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society, then completed an Internship in Internal Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin and a residency in ophthalmology at The University of Chicago Hospitals, Department of Ophthalmology followed by a Fellowship in Cornea and Refractive Surgery at the John Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah. Dr. Chang is a corneal specialist with expertise in the diagnosis & treatment of corneal disease, cornea trauma and surgical complications including the corneal transplantation techniques of Penetrating Keratoplasty (PK), Deep Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty (DALK), Decemet's Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSAEK) and Decemet's Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK). In addition, Dr. Chang provides cataract surgery and intraocular lens implantation (IOL) with advanced technology lens implants for the correction of astigmatism and near vision after cataract surgery.

“We welcome these cornea specialists and laser surgeons to the www.seewithlasik.com Editorial Advisory Board and look forward to their assistance in article review, topical guidance and clinical input regarding laser eye surgery, LASIK and new procedures and techniques for Lasik Eye Surgeries,” said Ms. Carlisle.

The decision to have LASIK Eye Surgery should be made in an informed manner. Patients considering Laser Eye Surgery of any type should seek complete information to be certain that Laser Vision Correction is the best vision correction choice for their individual situation. www.seewithlasik.com is an objective patient information, education and LASIK surgeon directory website containing material that will assist patients in making an informed decision about LASIK, as well as how to select a LASIK surgeon, the risks, benefits, side effects and complications of LASIK surgery and what LASIK Eye Surgery should cost. Patients should also follow the Seewithlasik LASIK Blog and become a Fan at Seewithlasik LASIK Facebook Page to receive the most current information.

In order to provide consumers with the most unbiased information, unlike many websites offering information about LASIK, www.seewithlasik.com does not accept funding, support or advertising of any kind from pharmaceutical, medical device, laser or lens implant manufacturers.

CONTACT: Katie Carlisle, Medical Management Services Group, L.L.C.
978-470-8217, or fax, 978-470-8218, or email, katie@seewithlasik.com

SOURCE: Medical Management Services Group, L.L.C.

Cataracts and Lens Replacement Surgery

QUESTION:
I am 20 years old and was born with a cataract. It was removed shortly after birth when my parents noticed it and since then I have not had a lens in my right eye. I am not completely blind...can still see colors and images but everything is blurry. Since I have not had a lens in that eye for almost 20 years, is it too late for me to get a lens replacement?

ANSWER:
The fact that the Cataract was removed shortly after birth is good as the longer Cataract Surgery is delayed in cases of congenital Cataracts the less likely a favorable visual outcome. But, if you have had no optical correction in the operated eye it is probable that the vision as interpreted by the brain from that eye failed to develop. This condition, called amblyopia or more commonly “lazy eye” may be somewhat permanently embedded and thus you may not be correctable with an intraocular lens implant (IOL) to a very high level of vision. That said, by placing an implant in that eye it is highly probably that you see considerable improvement in your vision and overall functioning in that eye. Perhaps you will not improve as measured by reading many additional lines on the eye chart but better nonetheless. It is impossible to say without a careful examination and testing how much your vision will improve. There is also an opinion that sometimes the achieved vision improves more than expected as a result of “neuroplasticity” of the brain even at 20 years old. This is very much worth pursuing by having a consultation with either a refractive surgeon who also performs lens surgery or a top Cataract Surgeon who can examine you and help set realistic expectations from the results of the testing.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK Surgery and Prism

QUESTION:
Can I have LASIK Surgery if I wear prism in my glasses?

ANSWER:
Whether of not you would be a candidate for LASIK if you wear a prism correction in your eyeglasses really depends on what the underlying reason for the prism is. Prism in eyeglass prescriptions is typically used to compensate for muscle imbalances or sometimes to minimize the predisposition someone might have toward diplopia or double vision. Both the strength of the prism correction and the orientation of the prism prescription are key pieces of information a LASIK Surgeon will use to determine whether you are a good candidate-maybe yes-maybe no-it really depends on your prescription and the results of your LASIK consultation. In addition, if the need for prism is the result of some other eye or systemic condition, this too might make you a poor candidate for LASIK. Your next step is to schedule an examination and consultation with a top LASIK surgeon and they will be able to give you the best advice.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.