Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Lens Replacement Surgery for Astigmatism

Question:
Would Lens Replacement Surgery be right for people with an astigmatism?

Answer:
Astigmatism is a common refractive vision problem that can occur by itself or in combination with either nearsightedness or farsightedness. Astigmatism is usually the result of an unequal curvature of the cornea. If your eyes are healthy and the cornea is healthy and simply has an unequal curvature, there are currently several types of refractive eye surgery that can be performed to correct astigmatism. Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK Surgery is a frequently performed type of Laser Vision Correction for astigmatism with or without nearsightedness or farsightedness and generally provides excellent results for patients who are identified as good candidates with realistic expectations and defined personal goals. Depending on your age, whether you have some other type of refractive error such as farsightedness, whether or not you have dry eyes, the degree of astigmatism and the health of your eyes, specifically whether you have any signs of cataracts or exceptionally thin corneal tissue, it is possible that your eye surgeon might suggest Lens Replacement Surgery with implantation of an astigmatism correcting toric lens implant as the procedure of choice. So, depending on your individual situation an eye surgeon who is both a LASIK Surgeon and a Cataract Surgeon will help you through the examination and decision process as to whether an astigmatism correcting lens implant might be the best choice for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK EVALUATION EXPECTATIONS

What To Expect at Your LASIK Evaluation?
Having LASIK may be an excellent vision correction option for you. However, the only completely reliable way to determine whether Laser Vision Correction or Laser Eye Surgery of any type is going to help you achieve your personal vision correction goals is to have a thorough consultation.

Your LASIK Consultation
Your LASIK consultation should consist of a number of clinical tests including:
  • Measurement of your uncorrected visual acuity
  • Measurement of your visual acuity with your current eyeglasses or contact lenses
  • Optical measurement of the current prescription that you are wearing in your eyeglasses and/or a review of your current contact lens prescription
  • A thorough review of your medical and eye history including all prescription and non-prescription medication that you have been or are currently taking
  • A refraction-automated or manual-to determine your current prescription
  • A topography measurement to digitally map the shape of your cornea
  • A pachymetry measurement of the thickness of your cornea
  • A measurement of pupil size
  • A microscopic evaluation of the health of your cornea and tear film including testing for dry eyes.
From this testing it can be determined whether you should proceed to the final level of testing whereby the actual preoperative measurements are taken for your treatment and a thorough examination of the Retina and Optic Nerve can be performed.

In addition to the actual clinical testing, your LASIK evaluation will include a full discussion of LASIK risks, benefits and complications and a thorough analysis of the personal goals and objectives that you feel are important to your success. The best way for you or someone you know to find out if they are a good candidate for LASIK is to have an evaluation, examination, and consultation with a LASIK doctor who is also a top LASIK Surgeon and a LASIK specialist.

WHO IS A GOOD LASIK CANDIDATE

Who Is A Good Candidate For LASIK?
The desire or the need to be free of the hassle of eyeglasses or contact lenses for seeing at distance motivates millions of people-just like you-to consider LASIK. Thoughts of being able wake up and see the alarm clock clearly- and just get up and go, have great appeal for anyone dependent on glasses or contacts. The freedom to take on each day's activities, unencumbered, has changed the lives of many.

LASIK is not for everyone. Here are some things to think about to help you determine if you are a good candidate for LASIK.

  • The great majority of patients who are nearsighted, farsighted or have astigmatism are potential candidates for LASIK.
  • Good LASIK candidates are at least 18 years of age or older and have stable vision. This means that their eyeglass or contact lens prescription has not changed much in the last year or so. Many people do not have "stable" vision until 21 years of age, however so each person is a bit different.
  •  Good LASIK candidates have healthy eyes that are free from retinal problems, corneal scars, and any other eye diseases. They have normal corneal shapes and thickness as well as healthy tears.
  • The best LASIK candidates are those with a lifestyle, activities or occupation in which they are dissatisfied with their contact lenses or glasses.

The best way for you or someone you know to find out if they are a good candidate for LASIK is to have an evaluation, examination, and consultation with a LASIK doctor who is also a top LASIK Surgeon and a LASIK specialist.

Corneal Transplants for Children

Children who suffer from various eye problems, conditions and eye diseases that warrant a corneal transplant have reason to be optimistic about their future social and educational development. Researchers from Australia reported on the outcomes of 640 infants, children and teenagers who received cornea transplants between 1985 and 2009. The cornea transplants were considered successful if they significantly improved vision and if the new corneas remained healthy for 10 years or more. The best success rates were seen among teenagers who had transplants for keratoconus. Among the children in the study keratoconus was the reason for performing the cornea transplant in 86% of those between 13 and 19 years of age. Among the teens that had a corneal transplant because of keratoconus, 75 percent achieved 20/40 vision or better, including some who subsequently needed glasses, contact lenses or vision-correcting surgery such as some type of laser eye surgery, and 90 percent still had viable corneas after 10 years, the study found. Connecticut Cornea Specialist Leslie Doctor, M.D. commented, “Indeed, the results of corneal transplantation have continued to improve, and are still improving each and every day. The use of corneal laser eye surgery to “fine tune” the visual results of a corneal transplant offer patients even greater opportunities”.

Monday, March 28, 2011

Corneal Inlays & Near Vision Problems

Near vision problems caused by the normal aging process Presbyopia in which we lose our ability to focus on close objects or reading material once we are over forty, may have some potential solutions in the future in addition to monovision LASIK. A report on the status of Corneal Inlays for near vision and presbyopia from the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) 2011 Annual Meeting in San Diego highlighted three optical approaches for Corneal Inlays. These include the Kamra Intracorneal Inlay (AcuFocus) which works by placing a pinhole in the center of the pupil, the PresbyLens (ReVision Optics), a hydrogel corneal inlay that places a near vision correction in the center of the pupil and the Flexivue (Presbia) which places the near correction in the periphery of a hydrophilic Corneal Inlay. At this moment in clinical trials it would appear as if PresbyLens has the advantage as far as the best correction of near and intermediate vision and that overall good near and intermediate was provided by these hydrogel corneal inlays, as well as offering reversibility. However, the compromise of distance vision may still remain an issue and the biocompatibility long term needs to be the subject of extensive ongoing testing.

CAN I AFFORD LASIK

Is LASIK Affordable?
Patients are pleasantly surprised to learn that LASIK costs with top LASIK surgeons are affordable! Most patients are thrilled to learn that they can have their treatment performed with some of the best LASIK surgeons-and be treated individually and personally-and not have to pay a single dollar up front if they do not wish to! Here’s how LASIK costs are affordable:

Easy Payment Plans
Many patients use easy payment monthly payment plans. You can arrange the amount you pay each month to fit your budget-AND you do not even have to put any money down! You can have your LASIK procedure today WITH NO MONEY DOWN-and with 0% interest if you would like!

Flex Plans-Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA)
Many employers offer Flex Plans-Flexible Spending Accounts or FSA’s. These plans allow you to have money taken out of your paycheck over time to pay for LASIK. What is even more appealing about Flex Plans is that money is withheld in Pre-Tax dollars allowing you to get extra tax savings. It is best to schedule a free consultation to find out if you are a candidate for LASIK-and then you will know exactly how much to have taken out of your paycheck!

Health Spending Accounts (HSA)
Health Spending Accounts are another way patients can use Pre-Tax dollars to pay for LASIK. If you have an HSA, it is best to go in for a free consultation to find out if you are a candidate for LASIK so they can tell you how much to allocate.

Insurance & Discount Fee for Service Plans
More and more health insurance or vision insurance plans are offering partial coverage or a discount for LASIK to their participants. Your LASIK surgeon’s office will be happy to review your plan. Even if they are not a direct provider on your plan, if you have coverage, they often will make every attempt to honor your benefit allowance.


Tax refunds often provide a nice source of unexpected cash that you can invest in yourself! If you know that you are going to be getting a tax refund, go in for a free consultation and find out if you are a candidate for LASIK. You can even use a “no money down-0% interest plan” to help you get treated today and pay with your tax refund tomorrow.

IS LASIK SAFE

How Safe Is LASIK?
Anyone considering LASIK or any eye surgery for that matter will want to know that the procedure is safe and has a solid overall track record of safety so that they can overcome any fear or anxiety they might have regarding the procedure. The safety of LASIK depends on a number of factors. By far the most important factors that can affect LASIK safety are the laser and instrumentation to be used to perform the treatment and even more so, the skill and experience of the LASIK Surgeon.

Long Term Track Record

Laser Eye Surgery for the Laser Vision Correction of nearsightedness was first performed in the United States upon Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the Excimer Laser on October 20, 1995. The Excimer Laser was specifically FDA approved for LASIK in 1998. So as of 2010, Laser Eye Surgery for Laser Vision Correction using the Excimer Laser has been performed for just under 15 years and the LASIK procedure has been performed under FDA approval for just over 10 years. It is estimated that some 16 million patients worldwide have had LASIK. LASIK is generally considered one of the most successful and safe surgical procedures of any type. In skilled hands nearsighted patients can expect to achieve 20/40 vision more than 98 percent of the time, and uncorrected vision of 20/20 or 20/25 in more than 90 percent of cases. The safety record is equally as impressive with regard to the loss of best-corrected vision. Vision loss to a level of worse than 20/40 is quite rare after LASIK, occurring in about only 3 per 1,000 cases. Serious complications, such as infection or corneal damage, occur even more infrequently in fewer than 1 in 1,000 cases. While not an infinite amount of time, the availability of the various Laser Vision Correction procedures, including LASIK for this 10-15 year timeframe with these results does give us access to real world experience and data that can be used to evaluate the various Laser Eye Surgery procedures and their safety. But, there is more to safety than simply the Laser device itself.


Safety is the Hands of the LASIK Surgeon

FDA approval provides some assurance that a particular medical device, in this case an Excimer Laser, is safe and effective for its intended use. However, the FDA does not have the authority or jurisdiction to regulate physician practices or in any way get involved in the practice of medicine. As a practical matter then, FDA approval does not indicate that a LASIK Surgeon is going to provide a thorough evaluation and consultation. FDA approval does not indicate or imply that LASIK Surgeons will provide a complete review of the possible risks and complications of LASIK-nor does it imply that a LASIK Surgeon will use the appropriate screening and decision criteria to be sure that a patient is in fact a good candidate for LASIK or any Laser Eye Surgery for that matter.

Thus with regard to LASIK safety, choosing a LASIK Surgeon is the most important decision a patient makes in deciding to have LASIK and is a significant part of making LASIK a safe and effective procedure. You should not choose a LASIK Surgeon based on slick advertising or low price. You should choose a LASIK Surgeon based on reputation in the community, the length of time they have been performing LASIK and the comfort and rapport established during your consultation. While the equipment used may provide a slight advantage or disadvantage in safety, it is ALWAYS the skill and experience of the surgeon that contributes the most to the overall safety of Laser Eye Surgery for the correction of nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism.

Sunday, March 27, 2011

BLADELESS LASIK & ABERRATIONS

The use of the femtosecond laser to perform bladeless LASIK or the mechanical microkeratome to perform traditional LASIK results in similar optical aberrations being produced in the cornea after LASIK The study results showed that 43 out of 46 eyes in the microkeratome group (93.5%) and 41 out of 48 eyes in the femtosecond group (85.4%) had uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/20 or better at 48 months after surgery. All eyes in both groups attained uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/30 or better.

The results of this study suggest that whether patients are having LASIK with a microkeratome or LASIK with a femtosecond laser to create the flap, they should have either a custom wavefront optimized LASIK procedure or a custom wavefront guided LASIK procedure in order to avoid inducing higher order aberrations.

Femtosecond Laser and LASIK Aberrations 
Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery: November 2011

Eye Surgery Technology Organization Launch

The American College of Ophthalmic Surgery (ACOS) was officially launched on January 17, 2011 with a mission of providing a forum for the exchange of ideas and feedback between eye surgeons and eye technology manufacturers offering insight and innovation in advancing eye care through technology education and application. The founding executive committee is comprised of eye surgeons and industry veterans who have made significant contributions in the areas of patient care in LASIK Eye Surgery, Cataract Surgery, Intraocular Lenses (IOL) and Laser Eye Surgery.

LASIK: LASER v. MICROKERATOME FLAP

A study reported from the Italian Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery compared thin flap LASIK Surgery with femtosecond laser-bladeless LASIK, with thin flap LASIK with the microkeratome indicated no difference in refractive outcome or complications or meaningful differences in aberrations.

Friday, March 25, 2011

DOES LASIK HURT WITH PAIN

Laser Eye Surgery Question: A lot of my friends have had LASIK or some type of Laser Eye Surgery to correct their vision. Some of them tell me that they didn’t have any pain and a few tell me they were in a lot of pain. What is the truth? What should I expect?

There are really two main categories of corneal laser eye surgery for vision correction-lamellar corneal laser eye surgery and surface corneal laser eye surgery. Surface corneal laser eye surgery includes procedures such as PRK, Epi-LASIK and LASEK. Lameller corneal laser eye surgery includes LASIK surgery and Bladeless or Blade Free All Laser LASIK such as i-LASIK and Z-LASIK with the femtosecond laser.

In performing surface corneal laser eye surgery it is necessary to remove the outermost layer of corneal cells called the epithelium in order to apply the laser to the surface of the eye. Removal of the epithelium exposes the sensitive corneal nerves and can create moderate and even severe discomfort and pain in some patients. Patients having surface corneal laser eye surgery typically have a thin “bandage” contact lens inserted in their eye for the first few days after their laser treatment in order to make them more comfortable and help the eye heal. Sometimes it is necessary to give them oral pain medications.

This is rarely the case with lamellar corneal laser eye surgery such as LASIK or Blade Free LASIK such as i-LASIK and Z-LASIK. Because lamellar procedures do not require the removal of the epithelium, there is very little discomfort and no bandage lens is necessary. Most often patients do feel some sandy or grainy sensation or a mild “sticking” but not really pain. This sensation usually passes in a day or so after the eye surgery procedure.

Thursday, March 24, 2011

FINDING A LASIK EYE SURGEON

Laser Eye Surgery Question: I asked my eye doctor about LASIK surgery and he told me I didn’t need it. But I have been thinking about it for a while. I am afraid to ask him to send me to a LASIK surgeon and I don’t know where to look for a good LASIK Eye Surgeon? Where can I look for eye surgeons who are specialists in LASIK treatments?

There are different types of eye doctors who can be involved in your LASIK care. Ophthalmologists are eye doctors who specialize in the medical and surgical care of the eyes and visual system and also the prevention of eye disease and injury. They can be either Doctors of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctors of Osteopathy (D.O.). Ophthalmologists are eye physicians and eye surgeons. LASIK surgeons are eye doctors who are ophthalmologists and actually perform Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK. Typically, LASIK eye surgeons have attended medical school, one year of internship and three or more years of specialized medical and surgical training in eye care as a resident in ophthalmology. Many then attend specialized fellowship training in order to become specialists in diseases and surgery of the cornea so they can become LASIK specialists. Generally these LASIK eye doctors have a great deal of expertise and can give you a thorough consultation and opinion about your suitability. Optometrists are eye doctors who are trained to examine, diagnose, treat, and manage vision and some eye health problems due to diseases and disorders of the eye and visual system. They are Doctors of Optometry (O.D.). Optometrists who are LASIK doctors usually have additional training in hospital settings, ophthalmology clinics or LASIK Eye Centers but don’t perform the actual surgery so that they often will refer to a laser eye surgeon to make the final decision about a patient’s suitability.

It is definitely worthwhile taking the time to find a laser eye surgeon who is a LASIK specialist. You can do so by visiting the web site for the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgery or other LASIK information and surgeon directory resources.

Custom Wavefront LASIK & Monovision

Question: I had Monovision LASIK Custom Wavefront Surgery done 4 months ago today. I still have halos around lights at night or early morning. It seems my close up vision eye interferes with my distance eye yet alone they work okay. I have also noticed that the distance of the "blended vision" has become worse. I know there are focus fluctuations. Can you let me know if it can take more than 4 months to even out? Do the halos really go away? If so, how long do you know it has taken some people? Is it possible to have the surgery re-done, (maybe there is a precise measurement the wavefront missed) It always seems I need to rub my eye to clear the vision. I don't mind waiting longer, but I'd like to know if more time is needed or is this as good as it gets (is the healing done by now)? I hear so many wonderful things and experiences with LASIK but to date I am disappointed with mine. Is there a slight adjustment that can be made to bring the 2 visions closer together.

Answer: There are many considerations here especially as we do not know your age, your correction or the overall health and condition of your eyes-especially your tear film integrity. First, you are adapting to a change in your vision that occurs from having Wavefront LASIK alone. Having more of the aberrations corrected or altered, rather than what you have been used to in eyeglasses or contacts sometimes requires some "neuroadaptation". Almost always this occurs within the first 3-4 months after treatment. Second, you do not say whether you had been wearing a monovision correction in contact lenses prior to your LASIK procedure. If you were, then there is no adaptation to the monovision expected. If you were not, once again there is typically an adaptation period of as long as 2-3 months where your brain is learning to use the "blended" vision in a different cortical vision pattern. Third, given that you are in need of monovision correction, it is probable that you are presbyopic and thus of an age where dry eye problems occur. We know that LASIK causes a temporary dry eye condition for some patients for as long as 6 months. Many of your complaints may very well be related to tear film instability from dryness. You should absolutely return to your LASIK Surgeon and review just as you did here, the problems, symptoms and complaints that you have. There are quick simple tests to see if you are failing to adapt to monovision correction, including just inserting a soft contact lens in the "near" corrected eye in order to demonstrate full distance correction and temporarily eliminate the monovision effect to determine if that is contributing. It is also relatively easy to observe tear film instability on examination as well. Please be confident that there are solutions for both of these possible problems in order to get you to where you need to be. If your LASIK Surgeon is either unwilling or unable to resolve this for you, seek a second opinion with a top LASIK surgeon.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

NEAR VISION & MONOVISION LASIK

Laser Eye Surgery Question: I am very nearsighted-around –7.00 D. I work as an administrative assistant in an office and now that I am 42 years old my reading vision is starting to get blurry. My optometrist said I should just wear readers or reading glasses or half glasses over my contact lenses. Can I have LASIK instead and not have to wear the readers-I don’t want to.

Besides being very nearsighted, you are describing the onset of presbyopia-a condition whereby the crystalline lens inside your eye that is typically soft and flexible begins to lose that flexibility and thus limit your ability to change focus from far to near and near to far. Patients with presbyopia typically report that their “arms are too short” and that near objects and reading material are becoming fuzzy or blurry.

LASIK-which is mainly a type of laser eye surgery for correcting distance vision, does have some application in correcting near vision through a technique called monovision LASIK.  Monovision corrects one eye for distance and one eye for near. Thus, the need for glasses with two different focal lengths is resolved by focusing each eye at a different focal length. Monovision LASIK can be effective for some patients with the need for mild near vision correction. Depending on the amount of close work you do at work and for how long each day, monovision LASIK may be a good alternative. One way to get a sense of how you will do with monovision LASIK is to mimic the effect with a temprary pair of contact lenses. Since you are already wearing contacts this shouldn’t be a problem to try at work and at home. It is probably best if you find a LASIK surgeon to fully evaluate you for LASIK with a consultation and he or she can then do the monovision trail with you as well. The simple answer to the question “Can I have LASIK if I am starting to need reading glasses?” can be best answered by finding an experienced laser eye surgeon who will take the time necessary to evaluate you properly and guide you through the right decisions in selecting the best type of laser eye surgery and whether monovison LASIK is a good choice for you.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

LASIK & LENS REPLACEMENT SURGERY

Laser Eye Surgery Question: I am 57 years old and wear bifocals all the time. The LASIK surgeon who examined me told me I would do better with a clear lens extraction and lens replacement surgery to correct both my far and near vision. Is this a good choice or should I go to another Laser Eye Surgeon?

What you are really asking is whether LASIK can correct both near vision and far vision and is it reasonable to consider another type of refractive surgery-Lens Replacement Surgery as an alternative to LASIK when correcting both far and near vision.

First, you need to understand a little about your eye problem and condition. If you are wearing bifocals to see BOTH near and far, it means that you have some distance vision problem such as nearsightedness, farsighted and astigmatism as well as presbyopia. Presbyopia is an eye condition that occurs because the crystalline lens in the eye loses its ability to flex and change focus, compromising your arms length and near vision. Presbyopia is a condition of the crystalline lens whereas nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism are typically conditions of the cornea. Thus, the best treatments for presbyopia are often done by replacing the crystalline lens-so called lens replacement surgery. It is entirely possible that at 57 years old you have the very beginning of a trace of a cataract forming in your crystalline lens. Thus, by recommending Lens Replacement Surgery your eye surgeon is attempting to remove the crystalline lens and thus the future cataract problem, correct your distance vision and your presbyopia all in one procedure. This may in fact be the best recommendation. A good way to answer the question “Is Lens Replacement Surgery an option for me, is to find an eye surgeon who is both a cataract surgeon and a laser eye surgeon who will evaluate you and give you a second opinion on and guide you through the right decisions in selecting the best type of laser eye surgery or lens replacement surgery for you. The simple answer to the question “Which is better PRK or LASIK?, is to choose a reputable a laser  surgeon who takes the time necessary to evaluate you properly and guide you through the right decisions in selecting the best type of laser eye surgery.

LASIK Surgery & Hyperopia?

Question: Does LASIK Surgery correct farsightedness or hyperopia?

Answer: LASIK Surgery can correct farsightedness or hyperopia. However whether LASIK Eye Surgery is the procedure of choice for people who are farsighted can only be answered after a thorough examination and consultation with a LASIK Surgeon who can offer LASIK Surgery as well as other possible alternatives to LASIK that might prove to be as good as or even better than LASIK including PRK and Lens Replacement Surgery. The ultimate decision can only be made between you and a top LASIK surgeon after your consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, March 21, 2011

LASIK Surgery & Glasses

Question: I was diagnosed with nearsightedness about 15 years ago and got glasses but never wore them. I went to an eye doctor again about 8 years ago and again got glasses but never wore them. Do I need to have worn some kind of corrective lenses before I consider LASIK surgery?

Answer: First, the fact that you keep getting eyeglasses and not wearing them suggests that perhaps your vision is not that poor and your nearsightedness is only of a limited degree. If this is the case and you don't need to wear glasses that often-and can even pass a drivers test without eyeglasses-LASIK Eye Surgery may not be worth the risk/benefit ratio for you. But, if you have some specific personal motivation for not wanting to wear glasses that is occupation or recreation related then this is a different matter. Having realistic expectations and a goal for what you want to achieve is key in choosing to have LASIK rather than wearing glasses or contacts. Next, it will be important to confirm that your eyes, especially your corneas, are healthy and free of diseases or conditions that would limit your success with LASIK. Then, a thorough and careful refraction of your eyes will be necessary. Typically this is done and then compared to a previous prescription so that it can be determined that your prescription is stable. Your LASIK Surgeon will only be able to compare your current prescription for stability against the glasses you received 8 years ago. If it is approximately the same as a current prescription you will be fine. If not the eye surgeon may elect to have you wait to determine whether the prescription is changing. Last, it is important that your vision be pretty much fully correctable to 20/20 with glasses before having LASIK. If, for some reason not wearing glasses has left your vision uncorrectable to a 20/25 or 20/30 level it may also limit your suitability as a LASIK candidate. So, it is not necessarily the case that you have to be wearing a full time optical correction to have LASIK, but there are things you need to have explored and answered by a LASIK Surgeon. Your best bet is to consult a top LASIK Surgeon for a consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

IS LASIK OR PRK BETTER

Laser Eye Surgery Question: I went for a LASIK consultation and the eye doctor told me I am a good candidate for either PRK or LASIK. Which type of laser eye surgery is better?

Here are some considerations for you to know and understand about PRK vs. LASIK. First, the long term clinical studies comparing PRK and LASIK show that the ultimate visual results of both types of laser treatment are virtually identical. However there are some subtle differences as well as some not so subtle difference.

Patients who have LASIK may have very slightly reduced contrast sensitivity in dim illumination. “May” is the operative word here. If one uses extremely sensitive clinical measuring methods they can sometimes find a slight reduction in “low contrast” vision. Often it is so slight that the patient does not notice it except in the testing conditions or in very extreme instances of reduced contrast situations such as driving at dusk in the rain. Thus it is a limited problem for most patients.

The real differences between PRK and LASIK are based on the fact that PRK is a “surface laser treatment” and LASIK is a “lamellar laser treatment”. PRK is performed on the surface of the cornea whereas LASIK is performed between the layers of the cornea. To do a LASIK it is a 2 step procedure-one to create the “layer” or “flap” and one to apply the laser. To do a PRK is a single step procedure, just applying the laser. Thus, whenever you have a multi step eye surgery procedure THERE IS A GREATER POSSIBILTY OF RISKS, SIDE EFFECTS AND COMPLICATIONS. Fortunately the risks, side effects and complications of LASIK are relatively few and minor if you are indeed a good candidate and under the care of a top laser surgeon. So, PRK does offer a safer risk profile because it is a single step procedure. However one of the not so subtle differences is that because it is a lamellar procedure, LASIK does not disturb the surface of the cornea during treatment. This provides patients with a much faster visual recovery and significantly less discomfort than PRK. This is why from a consumer perspective patients have tended to want LASIK eye surgery more than PRK. They can get back to pretty much normal activities within a couple of days without any real pain-just some mild discomfort-and with good vision. Most LASIK patients are able to pass a drivers test with 24-48 hours of their laser treatment. PRK patients often experience moderate discomfort that can last a few days and depending on the degree of their prescription can take a week or so to achieve good functional comfortable vision. The simple answer to the question “Which is better PRK or LASIK?, is to choose a reputable a laser  surgeon who takes the time necessary to evaluate you properly and guide you through the right decisions in selecting the best type of laser eye surgery.

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Lasik Surgery, Astigmatism & Cost

Question: I have astigmatism. How does that change whether I can have LASIK surgery? How much does it cost and is there a payment plan?

Answer: Astigmatism is a common refractive error that blurs your vision. Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK is usually able to treat nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. So even if you were both nearsighted and astigmatic or farsighted and astigmatic there is a good chance that Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction could be used to treat the needed correction. However, there are some types of astigmatism that may not be treatable. Also, your eyes must be healthy and free of any conditions or problems that cause unnatural or irregular astigmatism to occur. At a LASIK consultation and examination careful measurements will be taken of the refractive state of your eye, or “the prescription”, as well as a careful examination of the health of your eyes and especially the cornea and its thickness to be sure that you are a good candidate. Your next step is to schedule a consultation with a top LASIK surgeon. When you attend your consultation the staff will explain all of the LASIK costs and payment options BEFORE you have to commit to anything. If they do not review this with you to your satisfaction seek a second opinion. Each LASIK surgeon sets the fees for their practice or center individually and typically make available different LASIK payment options.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, March 18, 2011

LASIK Surgery & High Farsightedness

Question: I have worn glasses since I was two and contact lenses since I was six years old. I am 27 years old now and have a prescription of +6 diopters with astigmatism. I have been told different things by different doctors and don't want to go for a consultation just to be told I can't fix my eyes. My prescription has been stable at +6 for roughly 5 years. Do you have the right technology?

Answer: The simple answer as to whether there is LASIK technology to correct +6 is yes. The Wavelight Allegretto Wave® Excimer Laser has in fact received FDA approval and indication for treating this level of farsightedness. However, because of the degree of your farsightedness and the age at which you first started wearing glasses, your situation may be somewhat more complex than just finding a laser technology capable to treating your degree of correction. Highly farsighted children are sometimes amblyopic and have a "lazy eye" that does not fully correct even with eyeglasses or contacts. Highly farsighted patients sometimes have a corneal shape that is inappropriate for LASIK surgery.

Certainly as you noted, the stability of your prescription is an important factor in determining whether you are a good LASIK candidate. More importantly, highly hyperopic or farsighted patients such as yourself are often thrilled with the results of Lens Replacement Surgery and in the view of many Refractive Surgeons who also perform Lens Surgery, this is the procedure of choice when one has an understanding of the need to be less dependent of free of eyeglasses and contact.

However your current age may limit your suitability in the opinion of some eye surgeons. As you can see yours is a complex question that requires CAREFUL and THOROUGH consultation with someone who is a full scope Cataract and Refractive Surgeon, not only a LASIK Surgeon, to fully consider which if any options are appropriate and offer you the best risk to benefit ratio.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK Surgery and Tooth Extraction: Is There A Problem?

Question: I already had LASIK Surgery. If I now need to have a tooth extracted will if affect my eyes or LASIK results?

Answer: LASIK Eye Surgery is a type of laser eye surgery performed on the cornea which is the clear domelike lens about the size of a dime and the thickness of a credit card vision. After LASIK the surface of your eye heals within 24-48 hours and the more complete corneal healing usually occurs within three months after your treatment. Most patients have healed enough that their final vision correction is evident within three months. If you have had your LASIK performed a while ago your eye is likely to be completed healed. If you have a tooth that is infected and need oral surgery such as a tooth extraction, your oral surgeon or dentist can advise you of any risk of infection spreading to the surrounding tissue and sinus areas. While it is not impossible to have a tooth infection contaminate the eye area, it is unusual if the oral surgeon or dentist takes the necessary precautions by prescribing antibiotics.In any case your LASIK results should be impacted.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

CAN LASIK SURGERY HELP RETINA PROBLEM

Question: My son's Retina never formed. Can LASIK or some other eye surgery repair it?

Answer: Laser Eye Surgery or Laser Vision Correction such as LASIK Surgery is a type of corneal surgery that is performed to correct common refractive eye problems such as nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. LASIK is indicated for patients with healthy, relatively normal eyes that simply do not focus well at distance. Your description of your son's condition suggests that he has a developmental Retina problem rahter than a cornea, refractive or focusing problem. The best path if you wish to investigate any new eye surgery procedures, techniques or devices that might be helpful would be to seek a consultation with a Retina Specialist who can provide a thorough examination and perhaps offer options for you to consider.

Important Note:The information presented on www.blog.seeewithlasik.com or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

CATARACT MULTIFOCAL IMPLANT COST

Question: I have cataract. I would like to have multifocal lens implants. I am looking for a good cost to me out of pocket. I have Humana Insurance. Could you give me a cost range for both eyes? I have already consulted one surgeon.

Answer: Assuming that you have had a consultation with a cataract surgeon and you have in fact been told that you are a good candidate for multifocal lens implants to correct your vision after cataract surgery, here is what you should know. First, cataract surgery and lens implantation are not services and products we “buy” like a car. The single most important factor in your short term success and long term results are finding the best cataract surgeon to perform your cataract surgery and lens implant. Determining whether you are a good candidate for multifocal implants, choosing the exact type of multifocal lens implant, as there are currently several different ones available in the United States, taking the precise measurements and calculations for multifocal lens implants and setting realistic expectations for you-as well as the actually surgery itself-ALL are dependent on the skill and expertise of the eye surgeon and their staff. It’s not like shopping around at a number of Chevrolet dealers to get the best price on an Impala. You want to choose a cataract surgeon who is experienced in cataract surgery and experienced with multifocal lens implant. These are the best eye surgeons to choose. Choose by experience, word of mouth recommendation from friends, relatives and coworkers and NOT price.

The cost of cataract surgery and lens implantation with multifocal lens implantsvaries widely by geographic region and the individual surgeon as well as the costs of deductibles, co-pays and any unique features of your insurance. That said, the common range of the additional cost of multifocal lens implants that covers the extra measurements necessary, the implantation itself and the added follow up care usually ranges for $1500-$3000 per eye as set solely by the cataract surgeon based on their time, experience and expertise.

Important Note:The information presented on http://www.blog.seeewithlasik.com/ or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on http://www.seewithlasik.com/ is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK AFTER RK

Question: I had RK surgery when I was 45. I am now 62 and wondering if I would be able to have Lasik surgery to better my vision?

Answer: The most important question you need to have answered is whether your current vision is due to a normal change in prescription, a result of the possible instability of your RK, possibly the beginning of a cataract or some other eye problem. All of these questions can be determined at a consultation and examination by a physician who is a Refractive and Cataract Surgeon. With proper testing it will be possible to determine what options might be available to give you the best results. Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK may be one option. Lens Replacement Surgery may be another option. It all depends of the status of your vision and the health of your eyes. Your next step is to schedule a thorough consultation with a Cataract and Refractive Surgeon.

Important Note:The information presented on www.blog.seeewithlasik.com or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, March 14, 2011

Detroit LASIK Surgeon William Goldstein, M.D.

Detroit LASIK Surgeon William Goldstein, M.D. of The Laser Eye Care Center in Shelby Township, Michigan is pleased to announce his "15th Anniversary of Laser Vision Correction" in Michigan. Dr. Goldstein commented, "Over the past 15 years, helping to bring so many Detroit area patients the opportunity to become less dependent on eyeglasses and in almost all instances to help them become free of eyeglasses for seeing at distance has been a terrific part of my career as an eye surgeon. It is still striking to see LASIK patients I treated 15 years ago and how this has changed their lives in terms of improving their lifestyle, comfort and convenience."

Dr. Goldstein is well recognized for providing LASIK in Detroit as well as LASIK in Troy, Rochester Hills and Pontiac, Michigan. He is a member of the LASIK Patient Education & LASIK Surgeon Directory www.seewithlasik.com along with many top LASIK Doctors from throughout the United States.

Thursday, March 3, 2011

Lens Replacement Surgery v. Lasik for Presbyopia by Marc Michelson, MD

“LASIK Eye Surgery is likely to continue to be the Laser Eye Surgery procedure of choice for most patients, but for those needing concurrent far and near corrections, Lens Replacement Surgery for presbyopia, may be an excellent option,” said Marc Michelson, M.D., a Birmingham, Alabama LASIK and Cataract Surgeon.
As a result of the continuing developments in advanced intraocular lens (IOL) implant technology, Lens Replacement Surgery continues to emerge as a treatment option for presbyopia which cannot be optimally treated with LASIK Eye Surgery at this time. Presbyopia is the condition in which the crystalline lens of the eye loses it flexibility causing a progressive decrease in near and intermediate vision. While LASIK procedures produce safe and effective results for correction of distance vision, for those over 50 years old who need both the correction of far and near vision due to presbyopia, Lens Replacement Surgery using near vision presbyopia correcting Lens Implants many be a good choice. LASIK Surgeons and Cataract Surgeons are highly encouraged by the results and patient acceptance of the new lens implant technology.