Thursday, October 20, 2011

LASIK with Corneal Dystrophy

Question: I was told by eye doctor that I was not a candidate for LASIK because I have a Corneal Dystrophy? What can you tell me.


Answer: In general, in order to be a LASIK candidate you should be in good overall health and have normal, stable eye health especially with regard to the health and condition of the Cornea. This means a Cornea free of disease, scars or conditions that might cause any sort of atypical healing of the Corneal. In addition the Cornea should be of normal and sufficient thickness and shape and you should have an adequate supply of healthy tears with a stable optical prescription. Corneal dystrophies present in many variations including Basement Membrane dystrophies, Map-Dot-Fingerprint dystrophy, Lattice dystrophy, Fuch's dystrophy and even Keratoconus represents a form of Corneal dystrophy-so there are a wide variety of Corneal Dystrophies. Generally patients with Corneal Dystrophies are not considered good LASIK patients but with some types that are called "Anterior Basement Membrane Disease" are sometimes candidates for other types of Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction. Your most appropriate course of action is to schedule a consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon you can find who is ALSO a Cornea Specialist. He or she will be able to provide a definitive diagnosis as well as lay out what options might be possible.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

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