Thursday, December 15, 2011

Dry Eye, Contact Lenses & Video Terminals

The use of video terminals by contact lens wearers may very well lead to dry eye according to researchers reporting in the December 2011 American Journal of Ophthalmology. Wearing contact lenses in an office environment and spending more than 4 hours at a visual display terminal may result in lower tear film volume with significant dry eye symptoms. The study determined contact lens wearers and long-term visual display terminal workers had significantly worse tear film than those who did not wear contact lenses or worked for shorter periods on visual display terminals. The type of lenses worn had no real effect on the severity of the dry eye however the presence an air conditioned environment did seem to worsen the symptoms.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Not a LASIK Candidate

Question: I was told I was not a LASIK candidate and want to find out if anything has changed. 5 years ago I had a LASIK consult and told me that my cornea was to thin and my eye "too football shaped" to be a LASIK candidate and to check back in 5 years as there are many advances in the field of laser eye surgery. I have had glasses very thick glasses since I been 5 and I am now 31. My eyes have always been magnified like I drank 200 cups of coffee with glasses and I would really be happy to just not even lose the glasses but maybe reduce the thickness of my lenses or make it so contacts are an option. I am very self conscious about my glasses and have lacked confidence due to my glasses. I have always felt people look at me cause my eyes are too big. Have they come up with anyway of fixing or improving my vision yet? I am very anxiously waiting for some kind fix for my vision. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you.

Answer: It is difficult to really know whether you are a candidate for any of the options for helping become less dependent or even independent of eyeglasses without knowing more about your prescription and eye health. But here is some information that may be helpful. It sounds as if you are extremely farsighted and possibly have considerable astigmatism from the description that you have given--although the fact that your cornea was too thin does not fit with this exactly. If you are in fact extremely farsighted or hyperopic, and if you have a moderate to a high amount of astigmatism, you would NOT be a good LASIK candidate or perhaps for any type of Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK. People with prescriptions such as this do much better in terms of outcome and long term results with Lens Replacement Surgery with a Toric Lens Implant to correct the astigmatism.

IF-big IF-you were indeed a candidate for this you would STILL need to wear eyeglasses for reading and seeing arm's length and close vision as the Toric Astigmatism Correcting Lens Implants do not yet correct presbyopia....but WILL in the relatively foreseeable future. IF on the other hand you are extremely nearsighted with astigmatism it may be possible to use a Visian™ ICL which works like an implantable contact lens and could be combined with a correction for astigmatism with LASIK to give you the best result. In any event, your next step is to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area who is also a top Cataract and Lens Implant Surgeon and to schedule a consultation so that together you can determine what, if any, of these options might be worthwhile for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

AcrySof® IQ Lens Implant Confusion

Question: I am a bit confused by the different types of AcrySof® IQ Lens Implants for Cataract Surgery. I have seen information about the AcrySof® ReSTOR® Intraocular Lens for implantation after Cataract Surgery but my Cataract Surgeon provided a pamphlet about the AcrySof® IQ. What is the difference so I can make a wise choice of lens implant?

Answer: Indeed the choice of Lens implants for Cataract Surgery can be a little confusing but here is what you need to know. AcrySof® IQ Lens Implants for Cataract Surgery are available in three different types or designs: AcrySof® IQ Aspheric Lens Implant (IOL), AcrySof® IQ Toric Lens Implant (IOL) and AcrySof® IQ ReSTOR® Lens Implant (IOL). The AcrySof® IQ Aspheric IOL corrects distance vision only after Cataract Surgery using aspheric optics to minimize spherical aberration so that patients experience crisper distance vision especially in dime illumination or under low contrast conditions such as overcast rainy days or at dusk. It does not correct arm's length or near vision. The AcrySof® IQ Toric IOL corrects distance vision including astigmatism after Cataract Surgery using toric optics. It does not correct arm's length or near vision. The AcrySof® IQ ReSTOR® IOL corrects distance vision AND arm's length and near vision after Cataract Surgery and is considered a Multifocal Lens Implant (IOL). Hope this helps.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Saturday, December 10, 2011

LASIK & PRK for Low Myopia

Question: My eye surgeon says I can have either LASIK Surgery or PRK. I have low myopia and astigmatism. Which is better-which should I do?


Answer: With careful patient selection, realistic goals and expectations and an experienced and skilled LASIK Surgeon, the results from both LASIK and PRK are virtually identical. LASIK patients tend to have a quicker visual and somewhat more comfortable initial few days after their treatment-but the final visual results are the same. Because LASIK requires the preparation of a "flap" it is a two step procedure and thus has a slightly higher side effect and potential complication rate. Ask your LASIK Surgeon to help you decide by asking what he would have in a case like yours.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Lens Implants instead of LASIK

Question: I have been told to have lens implants instead of LASIK. I have been examined by many eye surgeons for LASIK and have been told that they cannot do LASIK surgery because my cornea thickness is less than it needs to be. They have suggested doing a lens implant. Is this possible and what are the disadvantages?


Answer: Successful LASIK Surgery does require an adequate corneal thickness for proper results and long term eye health. Depending you your prescription and the thickness of the cornea it is in fact entirely possible that you are not a suitable LASIK candidate. For some patients wishing to be less dependent or independent of eyeglasses and contact lenses for seeing clearly at a distance it is sometimes possible to use different types of Lens Implants to correct the vision. For moderate to highly nearsighted patients it is sometimes necessary to consider using a Visian™ ICL, which functions like and implantable contact lens-and we suspect this is what your eye doctors are recommending. With proper patient selection, the Visian™ ICL can provide good vision for nearsighted patients and outside the United States can also be used to correct both nearsightedness and astigmatism. Lens Implants are intraocular surgery and thus have the associated risks of any intraocular surgery which tend to be somewhat greater than those of corneal surgery such as LASIK. That said, if multiple eye surgeons are providing you with the same information it is most likely the case that you should consider other alternatives to LASIK in order to achieve your vision correction goals.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

Military LASIK & Refractive Stability

Question: I am currently deployed and know that with the military I get free LASIK Surgery. My vision two years ago was -5.00 and -5.25. I just took a eye exam before I deployed 2 months ago and my vision is -6.00 and -5.75. Is my eyesight too bad to get LASIK and how bad can your vision be until your not able to get LASIK.

Answer: First, THANK YOU for your service to our country and your dedication to the safety and protection of the United States of America and its citizens. With regard to your having LASIK, this is certainly an excellent consideration for someone like yourself who is likely to be hindered or even incapacitated by trying to wear eyeglasses or contact lenses under adverse and perhaps even combat conditions. At the current level of your nearsighted correction it is entirely possible that if your eyes are otherwise healthy in terms of the corneal shape and thickness and quality and quantity of the tear film-along with a normal retina and optic nerve-that your prescription is within the treatable range. However, what might exclude you from having LASIK at this time is the fact that your right eye seems to still be progressing and increasing in myopia a bit more than some LASIK Surgeons might be willing to accept. The best course of action is to schedule a LASIK consultation when you can at a Warfighters Laser Eye Center and the eye surgeon there will be able to make that determination for you.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Sunday, December 4, 2011

Time Off Work after LASIK

Question: If I work at the computer 8-9 hours a day how long would I have to be off work after having a LASIK surgery?


Answer: Assuming that you had a routine LASIK Eye Surgery treatment it would be normal and expected for you to return to work within a day or two with the following caveat. Dry eyes after LASIK are a very common and normal temporary post treatment complaint and for that reason patients are required to keep their eyes well lubricated with artificial tear eye drops and may also require insertion of tiny tear duct plugs or other prescription medication to help them produce enough tears during the healing period. Using a computer exacerbates dry eye complaints with or without LASIK because it slows down your blink pattern. So, find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and fully discuss what your work at the computer requires. From that information and the findings of your consultation he or she will recommend the best course of pre and post LASIK care to help you get the best results.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Dry Eye Help with Restasis® & Artificial Tears

Help for Dry Eye Syndrome which is also called Dysfunctional Tear Syndrome (DTS), is more readily achieved with the use of a combination of Restasis® and artificial tears than with artificial tears alone according to researchers reporting in the September 2011 publication of Eye & Contact Lens: Science & Clinical Practice. Dry Eye Syndrome is a disease of the tears and ocular surface that causes symptoms of discomfort, visual disturbance, and tear film instability with potential damage to the ocular surface. There are many approaches to managing Dry Eye Syndrome including avoiding adverse environmental factors, eyelid hygiene, artificial tears and lubricants, punctal plugs, tear stimulation and anti-inflammatory drugs. From this study it appears as if the combination of artificial tears and Restasis® is a helpful treatment for Dry Eyes.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Near Vision & LASIK Surgery

Question: While reading, I see that LASIK surgery can correct issues with seeing up close (reading). Is this correct? At what age is it good to get this done? I am 47 now and my eyes haven't changed for several years, but I don't want to get the surgery and then have to wear reading glasses a short time afterwards.


Answer: It is impossible to really advise you as their are some key details about your situation that would need to be clarified. You do not say whether you currently wear any reading correction or bifocal correction and it is not obvious what type and degree of correction you wear for distance if any. LASIK Surgery is beneficial for patients who wish to be less dependent or even independent of eyeglasses and contact lenses for seeing clearly at distance. It is possible for some people with certain types of correction and with certain near vision requirements to have Monovision LASIK whereby some help with reading and near vision can be offered by adjusting the correction of the non dominant eye so that it focuses more effectively for intermediate arm's length and near vision and "blends" with the full far vision correction in the dominant eye. Your best next step is to schedule a consultation with a top LASIK Surgeon in your area and have the necessary eye health evaluation as well as refractive measurements taken to determine what your suitability might be.


Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, November 14, 2011

LASIK: How Long Does It Last?

Question: I have a question about how long the effect of LASIK Surgery lasts. I am 22 years and my prescription is -7.5 D in both eyes . I want to know that LASIK can provide 20/20 for my prescription and whether my age is appropriate for LASIK or whether I should wait a year or two. I have also heard from many people that LASIK Surgery only lasts for 10 to 12 years and then have to go back to glasses again. Is this true?


Answer: First, the only way to know if you are a candidate for LASIK or any type of Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction is to have a thorough consultation with a top LASIK Surgeon. From a technical perspective -7.50 D is well within the treatable range of LASIK IF your eyes are healthy with an adequate corneal thickness and shape and healthy and adequate tear film. However, 20/20 should NOT be the expectation or goal. Deceasing your dependence on eyeglasses or contacts for seeing at a distance is a more appropriate goal. These are no guarantees of 20/20 for anyone-LASIK is surgery and each eye heals slightly differently. Your age is not a limit AS LONG AS YOUR PRESCRIPTION IS STABLE-the key element here is the stability of your prescription and not your age. The effect of LASIK does NOT diminish after 10-12 years. Your eyes may change for other reasons but the change in corneal shape from LASIK does not reverse-it is permanent. Your next step is to schedule a consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon you can find in your area.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, November 4, 2011

LASIK Surgery More Than Once?

Question: Can you have LASIK surgery more than once?


Answer: If you have LASIK Surgery and at some point in the future your prescription changes necessitating a re-treatment or enhancement, it is possible to do so IF your eyes are otherwise healthy enough in terms of quantity and quality of the tear film, health and integrity of the Cornea especially regarding its thickness and shape AND you do indeed require a meaningful change to your prescription. Depending on how long after you have the primary LASIK procedure you need an enhancement it is often possible to simple lift the flap and apply the laser correction, or if a very long time may require a complete recreation of the flap.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK & Reading Glasses

Question: I have a question about having LASIK instead of using reading glasses. I am a 51 year old male and I had great vision until I was 40. Now I wear reading glasses. My job has me using a computer at work and I use a computer at home as well. I find that the eye strain is exhausting. Can LASIK help with my vision?

Answer: LASIK Eye Surgery is primarily indicated for helping people who are nearsighted, farsighted and who may also have astigmatism become less dependent or independent of eyeglasses and contacts for seeing clearly at distance. It is most appropriate for people who wear their eyeglasses or contacts at the time for seeing far away. There are techniques such as Monovision LASIK that can help people correct BOTH far and near vision but in general LASIK for Laser Vision Correction of common refractive errors is for distance vision.

You do not state whether you are attempting to wear the reading glasses for working on the computer. If you are, they may not be the correct prescription for the "arm's length" vision that computer work requires. Further, working on the computer for prolonged periods of time is also known to cause dry eye problems that can make your eyes feel tired. Your best course of action is to schedule a comprehensive eye examination with your eye doctor and review the various distances you work at as well as the complaints you have identified. Chances are that LASIK is NOT a good choice at all but that several other alternative eyeglass options and dry eye management tools will be of great help.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, October 31, 2011

Cataract Surgery after LASIK

Question: If I get LASIK Eye Surgery now, can I have another eye surgery in the far future such as Cataract Surgery? My Grandmother had Cataract Surgery and was told if you have had LASIK Surgery, you cannot have Cataract Surgery.


Answer: If you have LASIK Surgery when you are younger and then develop a Cataract as part of the normal aging process when you grow older there is NO reason that you cannot have Cataract Surgery to correct your vision. It is helpful if when you have LASIK now, that you keep a copy of your preoperative measurements as these are quite useful to the Cataract Surgeon in doing the calculations for Lens Implant that is used as part of cataract surgery to correct your vision. having LASIK does make the measurement and calculations for Cataract Surgery Lens Implants (IOL) somewhat more difficult but using advanced imaging and measurement technology along with having the original pre LASIK eye exam results can reduce any difficulty a top Cataract Surgeon might experience.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Military LASIK & the Marines USMC

Question: I am seeking information about LASIK surgery and being in the Marines (USMC). I am looking to enlist in the marine corps maybe 5 years from now. I am currently 17 and was wondering what time would be best to get LASIK, if at all. I've read there are many restrictions and waivers to be signed and I wouldn't want to disqualify myself from deployment if this surgery is prohibited. I've heard as well that age plays a major role in determining this operation's safety (21 seems to be the popular vote amongst forum frequenters). I wear currently wear contacts, -3.00 in my left and -2.5 in my right and would certainly not want to deal with glasses during BT. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Answer: Performing the duties of a Marine can indeed be a real hassle wearing contacts or glasses. The various environments, weather conditions, need to use night vision goggles, aiming devices and on and on make it tough to wear contact lenses or glaases. Having LASIK and being in the Marines (USMC) is generally not a problem. However there are several things to consider. People who are involved in activities where there is a great deal of facial contact-such as kick boxing, wrestling, possibly basketball-are often counseled to opt for PRK Laser Eye Surgery rather than LASIK in order to correct their vision. Depending on your role in the Marines (USMC) this may be something to consider.

The reason the age of 21 is regarded as a starting point is to allow for the prescription to be stable. Most people require until 21 for their prescriptions to stop changing. Some actually require that they wait until a later age to allow for their prescriptions to stop changing. You should note that certain schools such as Special Forces, HALO and SCUBA may have unique requirements and require waivers if you will have LASIK. You should also note that virtually any active-duty and activated National Guard and Reserve soldiers-Army, Navy, Air Force or Marines-are eligible for Laser Eye Surgery under the Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program (WRESP) if they meet certain criteria. Your best course of action is to fully discuss the situation with the recruiter and a WRESP LASIK Surgeon.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

LASIK with Corneal Dystrophy

Question: I was told by eye doctor that I was not a candidate for LASIK because I have a Corneal Dystrophy? What can you tell me.


Answer: In general, in order to be a LASIK candidate you should be in good overall health and have normal, stable eye health especially with regard to the health and condition of the Cornea. This means a Cornea free of disease, scars or conditions that might cause any sort of atypical healing of the Corneal. In addition the Cornea should be of normal and sufficient thickness and shape and you should have an adequate supply of healthy tears with a stable optical prescription. Corneal dystrophies present in many variations including Basement Membrane dystrophies, Map-Dot-Fingerprint dystrophy, Lattice dystrophy, Fuch's dystrophy and even Keratoconus represents a form of Corneal dystrophy-so there are a wide variety of Corneal Dystrophies. Generally patients with Corneal Dystrophies are not considered good LASIK patients but with some types that are called "Anterior Basement Membrane Disease" are sometimes candidates for other types of Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction. Your most appropriate course of action is to schedule a consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon you can find who is ALSO a Cornea Specialist. He or she will be able to provide a definitive diagnosis as well as lay out what options might be possible.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK Lifetime Guarantee & Monovision

Question: I have a question about the LASIK lifetime guarantee and monovision. I had LASIK surgery around 7 to 10 years ago. I am now turning 45 and in need of readers all the time. I was never given the option of monovision LASIK at the time I did my surgery. Would I still be a candidate now? Would this be covered under the LASIK lifetime guarantee I paid for or considered a different surgery?


Answer: As we all enter our mid 40's we begin to develop a normal near vision focusing problem called Presbyopia. This condition is a normal and expected part of getting older and can often be helped using the technique of Monovision LASIK.

If you had LASIK in your mid to late 30's and your distance vision was well corrected, the fact that you need "readers" now at 45 is expected. It might be possible to "induce" a small amount of nearsighted correction in your non dominant eye with another Laser Vision Correction procedure such as LASIK or another Laser Eye Surgery. The only way to tell is to schedule a consultation with your LASIK Surgeon or another top LASIK Surgeon if you so choose who will be able to carefully assess the shape, health and thickness of your Cornea and quality and quantity of your tear film as well as your likely tolerance to Monovision. Whether or not a Monovision LASIK procedure would be covered under a Lifetime Guarantee is entirely at the discretion of your original LASIK Surgeon in accordance with the terms and conditions under which it was sold to you.

In general LASIK Lifetime Guarantees only cover enhancements for distance vision changes that are NOT due to other factors such as Cataracts. 95+% of all LASIK enhancements for distance vision are identified with the first 3-6 months after the initial LASIK procedure and thus paying for any sort of LASIK Lifetime Guarantee is somewhat of a scam as trusted LASIK Surgeons virtually ALWAYS provide any medically necessary enhancements with the first year after treatment at no charge.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

LASIK & Abrasions from Contact Lenses

Question: I have a question about having LASIK as I keep getting abrasions from my contact lenses. I wear contacts mostly and glasses when I need them. I have problems with the contacts if I wear them when I sleep even though my eye doctor assured me this is ok for about a week at a time. So I try to give my eyes a rest and my contacts some solution once a week. Lately I have been getting abrasions on my left eye about once a month bad enough to not be able to wear my contacts for several days. I am not sure why it happens. So what to do? I am tired of being in pain, and as I drive for my job every day I have trouble the times where I am so light sensitive I can hardly crack an eye open. Then pain for several days. What can I do about this? Is LASIK right for me?


Answer: First, STOP wearing your contact lenses as you are doing as you are exposing yourself to a considerable amount of risk. The risk of sight threatening corneal infection with contact lens wear during sleep and with corneal abrasions increase exponentially. There is obviously something very wrong with your contact lenses, the health of your cornea, the health of your tear film, the condition of your eyelids, the health of they eye's surface or all or some of the above. One or more of these factors may have contributed to the to your current state of contact lens intolerance. Nonetheless at the moment you are at considerable risk to say nothing of the discomfort you experience. You need to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and eve perhaps find one who is a Corneal Specialist and get a careful examination of the health of your eyes and tear film. During this process they will be able to advise you as to whether and when LASIK might be an option for you. Your eyes need to have a stable prescription, a sufficient and healthy tear film, a healthy normal cornea with a proper shape and thickness and you need to be in good general health. Once these items have been evaluated LASIK Surgery might be a good option to help you be independent of eyeglasses and not have to wear contact lenses.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, October 17, 2011

Find LASIK Surgeons for Flex Plan Benefits

This is the time when you need to quickly find a LASIK Surgeon for your Free Consultation if you are having LASIK and want to use a Flex Plan Benefit or Flexible Spending Account (FSA). Flex Plans make LASIK cost affordable. They allow you to have pre tax money taken out of your paycheck a little at a time to pay for LASIK. This LASIK benefit is like having pre-tax interest free easy payment plan for LASIK from your employer! However you need to hurry because your employer only gives you a limited time to tell them how much to withhold---and that date is approaching! If you are considering LASIK you need to find a top LASIK Surgeon and schedule a Free Consultation to find out if you are a good candidate. Once you know if you are a candidate then you tell your employer how much to take out of each paycheck and then you can schedule your LASIK treatment date in January. The important thing to do right now is to find a LASIK Surgeon and schedule your Free Consultation.

Monocular Double Vision after LASIK

Question: Our son had LASIK 1-2 years ago and now reported that he has been having blurry vision and double-vision off and on for about the last 4 months in his left eye. He didn't think too much of it at first, blaming it on tired or strained eye. He went to his eye doctor that did the LASIK Surgery, has had blood tests and an MRI-there was nothing seen behind his eye in the MRI. The problem is also that his left eye-ball sticks out about 3 millimeters more then his right-eye. That's reason for blood tests and MRI. He is to see his eye doctor on Tuesday to discuss result of all tests. Can you give me some insight as to what this problem he has could be?

Answer: Although it is impossible to really tell what might be causing the complaints without an examination or results of testing, it does sounds like the LASIK Surgeon your son is seeing is taking a careful thorough path to finding the cause. We do not know your son's age, but the onset of double vision or diplopia of any type is reason for concern. You state that the double vision is in the left eye. It does need to be confirmed that the double vision is occurring in one eye rather than when both eyes are open. Monocular versus binocular diplopia can have different causes. You state that you can physically determine that the left eye "sticks out 3 millimeters further than the right eye." Without examination and measurement we do not know whether the eyeball itself is actually protruding or it appears to "stick out" because the Cornea is too curved and protruding-these have different causes. So, the eye doctor your son is seeing will carefully evaluate the actual physical location of the eye in its socket, the pupils, the color vision, the eye muscles, the retina and especially the shape and thickness of the Cornea to determine if they are all normal and might be contributing to the problem. In addition the eye doctor will be looking at the blood work for any signs of systemic problems such as thyroid disease or diabetes that might be contributing as well as possibly ordering a visual field test to test the function of the visual pathway overall. So, as you can see it must be determined whether it is the eye itself, the visual pathway and nerves or a systemic problem that is causing the problem.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Sunday, October 16, 2011

LASIK for Accountants

Question: I am 24 years old, planning to have LASIK. My work as an accountant demands lots of reading and long hours of working on the computer. Should I reduce my readings and computer after the LASIK, or is it irrelevant?

Answer: Working on a computer or reading for prolonged periods of time should not pose any increased risk or discomfort after LASIK as long as you were a good LASIK candidate prior to the eye surgery. You need to be sure that your prescription is stable, you overall eye, corneal and systemic health are good and you MUST have a sufficient quantity of stable healthy tears. Prolonged near vision tasks challenges the tear film as we simply do not blink often enough and are subject to develop dry eye complaints even without LASIK. Thus, make sure that you tell your LASIK Surgeon about your work so that he or she can consider the health of your tear film carefully and perhaps even take increased measures to keep your tear film healthy during the period after you have your LASIK Surgery.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Eye Problems LASIK Solves

Question: I have a question about LASIK. What are the eye problems the LASIK solves? And, will I suffer from any of those problems in the future after the LASIK?

Answer: LASIK Eye Surgery is used to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism to help people see more clearly without being totally dependent on eyeglasses or contact lenses. In certain instances using a technique called Monovision LASIK, LASIK Surgery can help with some near vision focusing problems for those patients suffering from presbyopia which is associated with the normal aging process. LASIK is NOT a preventative procedure and thus if you were going to get more nearsighted you will get more nearsighted. If you were going to develop presbyopia you will still become presbyopic.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, October 14, 2011

LASIK and Increasing Nearsightedness

Question: I have a question about LASIK and increasing nearsightedness. I am 25 years old and nearsighted. I understand this problem continues to increase until the age of 30. If I have LASIK now will my nearsightedness continue to worsen until I am 30 or should it stop after the LASIK?


Answer: The progression of nearsightedness or myopia typically ends closer to the early to mid 20's than 30. Although, depending on the type of work performed and other genetic and health factors it can increase into the 30's. In order to be a good LASIK candidate optical correction that is not progressing. LASIK does not really influence the progression of myopia and one should not expect the normal myopic changes that would have otherwise occurred to cease after LASIK.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK & Reading Glasses

Question: I am nearsighted and wear contact lenses which work well to correct my vision. However, I must wear reading glasses to read if I have my contacts in. If I remove my contacts I can read, very well, up close. If I have LASIK surgery to fix my nearsightedness, will I need reading glasses?


Answer: If you have LASIK it will correct your vision just as your contact lenses do and so you will need to wear reading glasses unless you opt to have monovision LASIK. With monovision LASIK it is possible to slightly under correct your non dominant eye so that it helps with your near vision and arm's length vision. The most appropriate step is to find a LASIK Surgeon and schedule a consultation and discuss the monovision LASIK option.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK Monovision for Near Vision

Question: I have nearsightedness of -1.75 each eye and starting to suffer from presbyopia and near vision problems. Is LASIK Surgery an option for me? I don't think I would be interested in a lens implant. Also, does insurance pay any cost towards the surgery?


Answer: While LASIK is primarily used to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism to help people be less dependent or even eliminate the need for glasses for seeing at a distance, there are applications of LASIK that are useful and pretty successful for helping with presbyopia and near vision correction. The most typical way is to employ a monovision LASIK procedure where by calculating a planned under correction in the non dominant or "near vision" eye it is possible to enhance the rage of arm's length vision and near vision. There are a number of complex presbyopic LASIK procedures that include using aspheric treatment shapes and multifocal treatment zones but these have gotten much acceptance due to considerable variability in results. Your next step is to schedule a consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon you can find in your area and from the examination and results they will be able to tell you more about whether the monovision LASIK might work for you. In addition they will be able to check your specific insurance plan to see if there is a LASIK benefit for you. It will be helpful when you attend your LASIK consultation if you could have a close approximation of the distances you need to see more clearly at for the eye surgeon to possible "test" this with contact lenses to see how you respond.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

LASIK Surgery for Trifocal Eyeglasses

Question: I have a question about LASIK and trifocals. I am 53 years old. I have been wearing trifocal glasses for about 15 years. I went from not wearing glasses at all to trifocals. I have nerve damage in my left eye and it does not dilate properly. Am I a candidate for LASIK at all??


Answer: You do not say whether you are dependent on the trifocals to see clearly at distance as a primary correction or whether the trifocals are primarily to help you arm's length and near vision. LASIK Eye Surgery is primarily used for correcting distance vision rather than replacing bifocals or trifocals. There are however Multifocal Lens Implants for vision correction used for Lens Replacement Surgery that might be more suitable in your situation. A good next step would be to schedule a consultation with an eye surgeon who is both a top Cataract Surgeon as well as a top LASIK Surgeon and have an evaluation so he or she can make recommendations regarding your options.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

LASIK Parameters for Nearsightedness

Question: What are the parameters for which the LASIK surgery cannot be performed? I have nearsightedness of 1.75 diopters in the right eye and 2.00 in the left one. This eye problem happened over the course of the last 5 to 6 years, as before that my vision was perfect. I am now nearly 25 years old, so if I do have LASIK, to what degree can my vision can improve?


Answer: Good LASIK candidates are those people at least 18 years old with stable prescriptions who have good overall health, good corneal health, shape and thickness and who have healthy and plentiful tears. In addition good LASIK candidates have realistic expectations of LASIK Surgery and what can be achieved and they have personal vision correction goals that go beyond simply wanting to see better without glasses or contact lenses. Last, they thoroughly understand the potential risks, complications and side effects of LASIK. Your prescription is certainly within the customary treated range and one would expect a good result. The only way to really determine if you are a candidate and how well you will do is to find the best LASIK Surgeon you can and schedule a consultation.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Display Terminals and LASIK

Question: I am 37 year old Radiologist with astigmatism and myopia 5.00. Consider my occupation and working in front of screen on CT and MRI for more then 10 hours a day do you recommend LASIK Eye Surgery.

Answer: If you and your eyes are otherwise healthy, have an acceptable corneal thickness, shape and curvature, adequate tear film quality and quantity you should be a good LASIK candidate. Many people spend their work hours on display terminals and do quite well with LASIK. But, the only way to tell is by having a thorough examination and consultation with a top LASIK Surgeon. The key will of course be your ocular health, condition and tear film integrity.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, October 10, 2011

LASIK & Near Vision Correction

Question: Can I correct both my extreme nearsightedness (-9) as well as my recent presbyopia with LASIK Surgery?

Answer: The technical answer to whether LASIK can correct presbyopia is "sort of". First lets discuss whether you would be suitable for LASIK Surgery at all given your extreme nearsightedness. At -9.00 you are certainly within the programmable range of the lasers used today. However, whether you can have LASIK or any Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction is going to depend on the health and shape of your cornea as well as its thickness. A -9.00 correction requires a significant amount of tissue removal and this means that you have to have an adequate corneal thickness. Along with this of course you need a healthy and sufficient tear film and good ocular, retinal and overall health. Now-regarding the recent onset of presbyopia and near vision problems-it is possible to use a monovision correction for many patients even with high myopia to obtain a reasonable amount of presbyopia correction. You should approximate this with contact lenses first however. there are a number of "multifocal" laser procedures either in clinical trials or being used on an experimental basis throughout the world and the U.S. For some low degrees of myopia the results are "okay"-for a challenging highly myopic patient our counsel would be to avoid them at this time. Find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation-then you will be able to fully explore your candidacy and alternatives.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Good LASIK Candidate?

Question: I have a question about whether I am a LASIK candidate. I am going to be 18 this coming December and have worn glasses since I was 8 or 9-they are thick. I am a boxer and I am going to join the military? Can I be a LASIK Surgery candidate?

Answer: Let's talk about your age first-being 18 is the really the absolute minimum age and what really matters is whether your eyeglass prescription is stable or changing. If it is stable then you are in good shape. You don't say whether your "thick glasses" are for farsightedness or nearsightedness. If they are for farsightedness it could be a problem-likewise if you are extremely nearsighted and your cornea is not sufficiently thick this too could make you a poor candidate. Various branches and schools within the military may have slightly different requirement however entering the military after LASIK is not a problem unless you are going into certain areas of SCUBA or HALO training or certain flight programs. That said it would be important to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and around your 18th birthday schedule a LASIK consultation at which time after a full examination or measurements it will be possible to tell if you are a good LASIK candidate or perhaps a candidate for another Laser Eye Surgery for vision correction. Because you are a boxer and subject to a fair amount of facial impact it is quite possible that you will be better off with another form of Laser Vision Correction such as PRK.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Will the maximum amount that I can contribute to my employer's medical flexible spending account shrink next year?

Here's how to take advantage of an FSA before the amount you can contribute to one is lowered in 2013.


QUESTION: Will the maximum amount that I can contribute to my employer's medical flexible spending account shrink next year? I recall hearing that the contribution limits will change.

ANSWER: Actually, the rules won't change until 2013, when the maximum amount employees can stash in a medical FSA will be capped at $2,500 per year (that limit does not apply to employer contributions). Currently the maximum limit varies by plan, but many employers allow employees to set aside $4,000 or more in these pretax accounts for medical expenses. You can sign up for your 2012 contributions during open-enrollment season this fall.

In light of the impending change, however, you can make the most of your FSA in 2012. If you've been thinking of having an elective medical procedure done that's not fully covered by insurance — such as laser eye surgery for you or orthodontia for your kids — you might want to schedule it before the FSA limit changes, so you'll have access to more tax-free money.

And, if you plan carefully, you may have an even bigger stash of tax-free money to use for out-of-pocket medical expenses during the first 2½ months of 2012 or 2013. If your employer extends the deadline for using FSA funds to March 15 of the following year, rather than December 31, you can combine any funds remaining from the previous year with the entire amount you earmark for the current year — even though the full amount has not yet been deducted from your paycheck. If, for example, you have $1,000 left over from 2011 and you sign up to contribute $4,000 to your FSA for 2012, you may be able to use $5,000 in tax-free money to pay for out-of-pocket medical expenses from January 1 to March 15, 2012.

BY:  Kimberly Lankford, Kiplinger's Personal Finance — 09/13/11

Monday, October 3, 2011

LASIK Cost Affordable with Flex Plan

LASIK cost can be quite affordable by using employer sponsored Flex Plans or Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA). Flex Plans or Flexible Spending Accounts FSA) allow you to have money taken out of your paycheck over time to pay for LASIK. So-its like getting a pre-tax interest free easy payment plan for LASIK from your employer! Since the money is withheld tax free you even save more. If you are thinking about LASIK you need to find a top LASIK Surgeon and schedule a Free Consultation to find out if you are a good candidate. If you are then they can tell you how much to have set aside in your Flex Plan or FSA. Then you can schedule the actual date of your LASIK Surgery. The important thing to do right now is to schedule your Free Consultation so that you can see if LASIK is right for you. Your employer has a time limit on when you will be able to tell them to put money away for LASIK in January 2012 so get that appointment scheduled!

Thursday, September 29, 2011

LASIK Enhancements-Should I have One?

Question: I have a question about having a LASIK enhancement. I had LASIK 11 months ago. My original prescription was -3.50 in the right eye and -4.00 in the left eye. The procedure went very well but I had some dry eye and with Restasis is was okay. At the 6 month check-up I was 20/30 in my left 20/20 in my right eye and now after 11 months I am still 20/30 in my left. I just had a consultation with the LASIK Surgeon, who's reaction was "I can do a LASIK enhancement if it bothers you, but if you can tolerate it, my opinion is to just leave it be". I went through 2-3 years of my left eye being under corrected even with glasses, so it's annoying as all get out. I'm just not sure if it'll be worth it. I'm in a quandary. On one hand, I'm kind of miffed that I spent the money to see perfectly and am just slightly less clear in the left eye. On the other hand, it's not horrifically bad, just slightly less clear with like reading the digital clock and being able to see the speed limit signs. The one thing I'm scared about is the possible negative outcomes of an enhancement (over correction, epithelial in growth, halos) because the initial surgery went so well. It also seems that with every blink of the left eye, I get slightly different vision. I can be looking at the digital clock on the DVD player from the couch, cover my right eye, and hardly be able to make out the numbers. But other times it doesn't seem like there's very much of a difference. Can you offer me opinions PLEASE??


Answer: It sounds like you have a few things to think about.

First, is the notion that you "paid for perfect vision". If this is why you had LASIK it was an unrealistic expectation. LASIK is surgery. There is no guarantee of a so called "perfect" outcome. The use of Snellin Visual Acuity to measure "success" is not really appropriate. What is appropriate is asking yourself of you are better off being able to do virtually everything in your life without being dependent on eyeglasses or contacts to see at a distance? With the vision you have now it is a pretty sure bet you can do this. Further it is not normal to compare the two eyes-each eye heals slightly differently.

The second thing to think about is that you seem to have fluctuating vision with blinking that comes and goes-this is very often do to a continued dry eye or tear film problem that may be caused by LASIK or a mild inflammation or irregularity in the health or condition of your eyelid margins. You should fully investigate the cause with your LASIK Surgeon as this may simply require that you continue Restasis or have some treatment for your eyelid margins. If after this you still have 20/30-as you most likely will-then you should just accept it as this is an excellent outcome.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Monday, September 19, 2011

Should I have LASIK?

Question: I am interested in LASIK but have a few concerns:


1) My vision has gotten progressively more near-sighted over the past several years. Small changes, but I started at about -2.00 in each eye in my early twenties, and now I am 28 and at -3.75. The changes seem to be slowing down, but it hasn't stopped. I heard that you should wait until vision is stable.

2) I have dry eyes. It is not usually severe, and much of the time it doesn't bother me. But, there are times when I have to use artificial tears (which don't seem to help much), and occasionally it gets pretty bad, and is extremely bothersome. I am confused about the information I've read about LASIK and dry eyes. Is the worsening of dry eye symptoms after LASIK permanent or temporary?

3) If I choose to get tear duct plugs, how much extra might that cost, and how effective are they? What are the downsides of getting them?

Answer: Your questions ascertaining your suitability for LASIK are excellent. First, if your vision has progressed from -2.00 to -3.75 during your early to late twenties it suggests that your nearsightedness is progressive rather than stable at this time. Over the past few years criteria for refractive stability have loosened up somewhat but a conservative approach might be to demonstrate that your prescription has not changed more than -.50 over a 12 month horizon. This would be a conservative approach to refractive stability and some LASIK Surgeons vary somewhat from this standard.

Regarding dry eyes, you certainly need to have a careful evaluation of yourr tear film as part of your LASIK consultation. Through this evaluation, the best LASIK Surgeons will be able to determine whether both the quality and quantity of the tear film will allow you to have the best possible results. If there is a deficiency in either it may be necessary to a) use artificial tears b) artificial tears + punctual plugs c) artificial tears + punctal plugs + Restasis prescription eye drops. Your LASIK Surgeon will want to treat ANY tear film deficiency PRIOR to your procedure. After LASIK it is very often the case that there is TRANSIENT dry eye whether or not you had a pre existing dry eye problem. Most often it is limited to less than 6 months after the LASIK Surgery procedure and will most likely treated with either punctal plugs and/or Restasis. If you should need punctal plugs the cost is usually covered by insurance. They along with Restasis are quite effective in dry eye treatment. Really there are no downsides to punctal plugs for dry eye should you require them.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

LASIK Surgery with Diabetes?

Question: I have a question about having LASIK surgery if I have diabetes. I am a type one diabetic, would I be a good candidate for LASIK eye surgery?

Answer: Type I Diabetes is not an absolute contraindication for having LASIK Eye Surgery but there are several considerations to be aware of.. Type I Diabetes is uusually diagnosed in children and young adults. As with anyone having LASIK or any type of Laser Eye Surgery for Laser Vision Correction your prescription must be stable. Typically refractive stability should be demonstrated over 1-2 years AND for anyone with Diabetes it would be important to make sure that there was refractive stability through the range of blood glucose levels experienced by the patient. That is, the patient should have pretty tightly controlled blood glucose levels.that do not cause any visual fluctuations. A thorough evaluation of the retina should document the presence and extent of any Diabetic Retinopathy so as not to confuse the visual results and outcomes of LASIK with any vision limitations caused by the retina. A careful evaluation of the cornea is done as part of any LASIK evaluation but specific observation of the corneal basement membrane is important in Diabetic patients as sometimes they have less than optimum basement membrane health and this might warrant recommendation of a different Laser Eye Surgery procedure for vision correction. MANY Diabetic patients elect to have LASIK and do so quite successfully. The key is to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and schedule a consultation. They will confer with your Internist or Endocrinologist to make sure that you get the best possible result.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Gene for Nearsightedness Identified by Israeli Researchers

In an article appearing online in the American Journal of Human Genetics a Ben-Gurion University of the Negev research group led by Professor Ohad Birk has identified a gene whose defect specifically causes myopia or nearsightedness. "We are finally beginning to understand at a molecular level why nearsightedness occurs," Professor Birk relayed. The discovery was a group effort at BGU's Morris Kahn Laboratory of Human Genetics at the National Institute for Biotechnology in the Negev and the Dayan Clinical Genetics Wing at Soroka University Medical Center.

Nearsightedness is the most common human eye disorder and is mostly a hereditary trait. Aside from being a significant public health concern, nearsightedness also leads to a higher incidence of other secondary eye disorders, such as retinal detachment, macular degeneration, as well as early onset glaucoma and cataracts. Despite decades of intensive research, the specific genes whose defects lead to nearsightedness have remained elusive. The defective gene was identified in a thorough study of severe early-onset myopia that is common in a specific Bedouin tribe in southern Israel. The gene encodes an enzyme that is essential for the final modification of collagen in the eye. In the absence of the active form of this enzyme, aberrant collagen is formed, causing the human eyeball to be longer than normal. As a consequence, light beams entering the eyeball focus in front of the retina rather than on the retina itself and myopia emerges.

Astigmatism and NFL Football-What's In Common?

What do an official NFL Football and Astigmatism have in common? The Baltimore Ravens......The Washington Redskins.......The New England Patriots all certainly demonstrated laser vision precision in passing this week. But, the common feature is really that the shape of a football is very much like the shape of a cornea and an eye that has astigmatism! Fortunately today we can correct that football like shape with eyeglasses, contact lenses and LASIK Eye Surgery-and for those patients who have astigmatism and need Cataract Surgery we can even correct their astigmatism with astigmatism correcting toric lens implants. If you have an astigmatism and might wish to become less dependent or even free from the hassle of eyeglasses or contacts think about LASIK to achieve your personal vision correction goals.

Friday, September 9, 2011

LASIK with Retinal Hole Problem

Question: I am interested in LASIK but I may have a retinal problem. Three years ago my eye doctor found a hole in my retina in my left eye. I have not had any problems with floaters, flashes of light or anything like that. The hole has also not changed in the three years since it has been discovered. Would I be a possible candidate for LASIK eye surgery?


Answer: Depending on the characteristics of the retinal hole and its stability you may or may not be a candidate for LASIK. If the hole is due to thinning from an elongated eye and is well attached at its margins without any associated tears or areas of "traction", it is very possible that you would be cleared to have LASIK. If the hole looks unstable in any way and might lead to a further tear or retinal detachment you would be excluded from having LASIK. The most appropriate next step is for you to find the best LASIK Surgeon in your area and schedule an examination and consultation. From the examination the LASIK Surgeon will be able to determine whether you are a suitable candidate. If there is any question about the integrity and stability of your retina, he or she will refer you to a retinal specialist to help determine any risk.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Joining the Military after LASIK

Question: I am interested in having LASIK but I am joining the military. Do you know if LASIK is allowed if I was to be joining the military?


Answer: The types if environments and tasks military personnel are exposed to can make the wearing of eyeglasses and contact lenses somewhat of a challenge. LASIK can be a good alternative for military personnel exposed to dusty or muddy environments as well as eliminate any concern about losing glasses or contacts in combat conditions. The Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force all accept personnel who have had LASIK but there may be some restrictions in the types of training and services that are allowable for certain military service members who have already had LASIK.

Some things to consider are that the Navy and Marines will routinely grant a waiver for pilots or student naval aviators to fly after PRK, assuming preoperative standards are met, no complications in the healing process were encountered and passing their standard vision tests. Candidates who have had PRK can get a blanket waiver for the Special Forces Qualification, Combat Diving Qualification and Military Free Fall courses. PRK and LASIK are both waived for Airborne, Air Assault and Ranger schools. However, those who have had LASIK must enroll in an observational study, if a slot is available, to undergo training in Special Forces qualification. LASIK is disqualifying/non-waiverable for several United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) schools (HALO, SCUBA, SERE) according to Army Regulation 40-501. THE BEST THING TO DO IS CHECK FOR THE CURRENT REGULATIONS, REQUIREMENTS AND WAIVERS WITH A RECRUITER AND/OR COMMANDING OFFICER AS THEY ARE REGULARLY MODIFIED.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

LASIK Surgery with Nystagmus and Astigmatism

Question: I have a question about having LASIK Surgery if I am albino and have astigmatism and nystagmus. With nystagmus is there any possibility of having LASIK?


Answer: In addition to the lack of pigment in the Iris and the Retina, ocular albinism is often associated with nystagmus and astigmatism. Nystagmus is an involuntary eye movement which can be present in differing patterns of movement. Depending on the type and severity of the nystagmus it is quite possible to have LASIK Surgery for vision correction. Today, most excimer lasers used for Laser Vision Correction use scanning and tracking technology to follow the position of the eye and deliver the laser treatment to exactly the correct location on the cornea. Scanning and tracking systems actually measure the position of the eye hundreds of times per second and adjust the energy delivery to the right position, thus can actually compensate for the involuntary eye movements of nystagmus in many cases. Your next step is to schedule a consultation with the best LASIK Surgeon on your area and have a thorough examination to see if you would be suitable candidate.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, September 2, 2011

Corneal Erosion, Contact Lenses and Safety

Contact Lenses are often trivialized with regard to safety as a result of their overall commercialization. However, according to researchers reporting in Contact Lens & The Anterior Eye-The Journal of the British Contact Lens Association, contact lens wear continues to be the highest single risk factor for microbial keratitis, particularly when worn in the extended wear modality. For microbial keratitis to occur, the presence of bacteria along with a break in the corneal surface is required. A break can occur from any form of corneal erosion both with and without contact lens wear. However the risk of infection is greater during contact lens wear as the lens can provide a source of bacteria.The causes of corneal erosion with contact lens wear are not completely understood but may be related to certain risk factors such as such as extended wear. Researchers are working to allow the appropriate diagnosis and effective treatment as well as the development of preventative strategies so as to further enhance contact lens wearer safety.


Dry Eye Patients Lose Work Productivity

Dry Eye patients lose productivity at work according to a study published in Current Medical Research & Opinion. A cross sectional dry eye study was administered to more than 9,000 patients who were employed and had self reported and physician diagnosed dry eye symptoms. The researchers said the loss of productivity was more pronounced among individuals who work in an office environment where the make portion of the work day is spent using a computer or reading. This is consistent with the fact that if you take patients with dry eyes and place them in activities such as computer work where the blink rate is decreased by 50% or more you actually make the problem worse and even more symptomatic for patients.

Monday, August 29, 2011

LASIK for Blurry Far Vision with Multifocal Lens Implant

Question: I have a question about LASIK Surgery for distance vision correction after a ReSTOR® Multifocal Lens Implant. I had a ReSTOR® Mutifocal lens put in my left eye 3 weeks ago. My intermediate and close vision is good, but far distance is very blurry. I have put off doing the right eye because of this. If I have the right eye done will they sync up and I will be able to see at a distance better? Would LASIK Surgery help with seeing better at a distance. I understand that it takes several months for brain and eyes to learn to work together. Am I expecting too much too soon. Would it be better to go ahead and do the other eye now?


Answer: In general patients having ReSTOR® Multifocal Lens Implants see pretty well at distance shortly after their surgery. The fact that you describe your distance vision as "very blurry" is a bit of a concern. There are several things to consider in concert with your Cataract Surgeon.

First, the nature of the optical design of the ReSTOR® lens does in fact cause some small number of patients to have difficulty with their distance vision-in some cases it gets better and in others is does not. They also sometimes experience a "smudge" in their vision or what they perceive as blurriness due to a disturbance in their contrast sensitivity from this type of Lens Implant. This type of optical problem usually goes away after a month or so and if it does not and it is the only reason for the reduced vision at distance may warrant exchanging the lens if it is that disturbing. LASIK Surgery would not be of any help in this situation. You also state that your intermediate and distance vision are in fact good. There is a possibility that you may be slightly overcorrected at distance which is causing the far vision blur and making the near and intermediate a bit "too good". Your Cataract Surgeon should be able to easily measure the refraction of your eye and determine whether this is the case. If it is the case there are several options including a) the ReSTOR® can be exchanged for a different power which requires another intraocular surgery b) wearing a mild eyeglass prescription for seeing at distance or c) as you have questioned, depending on the degree of correction to be altered you could be a candidate for a LASIK Surgery to achieve the desired distance vision. BUT-all of these options and their timing should be guided by you Cataract Surgeon IF and only if there is indeed a small residual refractive error that needs to be corrected. It is absolutely worth exploring this with your surgeon and if you do not get a satisfactory explanation and plan then consider seeking a second opinion with a top Cataract and LASIK Surgeon in your area.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Friday, August 19, 2011

Focusing Lens Implants to Replace Old Implant?

Question: Has there been any research in the replacement of older lens implants with the new focusing lens implants?


Answer: If you have already had a Lens Implant some time ago using a basic monofocal design for seeing at distance and now wish to replace it with either an accommodating lens implant, such as the Crystalens® Accommodating Lens Implant, or a multifocal lens implant such as the ReSTOR® Multifocal Lens Implant or the Tecnis™ Multifocal Lens Implant, you will be quite limited in what is possible. A Lens Exchange of this type is an exceedingly complex surgical procedure that significantly increases the risk of complications and decreases the overall likelihood of success with the focusing or multifocal lens implant. While it is perhaps possible to do, this the general consensus among top Refractive Cataract Surgeons is that they are not at all anxious to offer this as an option to patients.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on www.seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of www.seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Astigmatism and Cataract Surgery

Question: I have a question about astigmatism correction with eyeglasses and cataract surgery. I am facing cataract surgery have some astigmatism and do not wish to use the special toric lens implant. Will eyeglass correction for astigmatism provide the same result?


Answer: For patients having Cataract Surgery who have preexisting astigmatism, it will need to be corrected in order to get the best possible vision after their Cataract operation. There are three primary methods of correcting astigmatism for Cataract patients. These include astigmatism correcting toric lens implants, Limbal Relaxing Incisions (LRI) and eyeglasses. Another alternative is Laser Eye Surgery such as LASIK however with the popularity of toric lens implants this is not used much anymore. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. Astigmatism correcting lens implants probably provide the most normal and natural vision correction as they are placed right in the eye-they do cost a little more but generally provide very good vision such that patients typically no longer need to wear eyeglasses to see at distance after Cataract Surgery. Limbal Relaxing Incisions (LRI) can also be used to correct astigmatism but perhaps with a slight bit less precision than the Lens Implants. Astigmatism correction in eyeglasses after Cataract Surgery generally provides excellent vision correction-equivalent to toric lens implants-but does require the wearing of glasses to see clearly and thus creates the same inconvenience, reflection issues and barriers as any other eyeglass prescription.

Important Note: The information presented on the About Cataract Surgery Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask Cataract Surgeons section on www.aboutcataractsurgery.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to Cataracts, Cataract Surgery of Lens Implants. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask Cataract Surgeons section of www.aboutcataractsurgery.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and Cataract Surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

LASIK Recovery and Sunglasses

Question: My 22 year old daughter is nearsighted with astigmatism wants LASIK surgery as she says the weight of her glasses frames gives her a headache. She says she can only do this in the winter as you have to wear sunglasses for a long time if you do it in the summer. Is she correct? Could she have LASIK without wearing sunglasses for a long time?

Answer: On general the recovery from LASIK is actually quite quick. The vast majority of LASIK patients typically experience mild grittiness and minor irritation for up to a couple of days after their treatment and some experience mild to moderate light sensitivity-however it is not typical for patients to have to wear sunglasses for prolonged periods of time. That said, the wearing of sunglasses for protection from UV light is a healthy and important practice for patients whether they have LASIK or not. The notion of winter treatment being preferable because there is less UV light is really not relevant as one also should strongly consider sun protection in the winter months. Your best next step is to schedule a consultation with a top LASIK Surgeon in your area and first and foremost determine whether your daughter is indeed a good candidate for LASIK or any type of Laser Eye Surgery for the vision correction.

Important Note: The information presented on the See With LASIK Blog or provided in response to a request for information in the Ask LASIK Surgeons section on seewithlasik.com is not intended to diagnose or treat eye problems, eye conditions or eye diseases including appropriateness of treatment, risks, complications or side effects as related to LASIK. In particular a response to an inquiry made on the Ask LASIK Surgeons section of seewithlasik.com is not meant to take the place of the professional medical care provided by your eye doctor, ophthalmologist and LASIK surgeon. Contacting us via e-mail or any other means is not a substitute for medical care.